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Quiz about Marshals of the Soviet Union
Quiz about Marshals of the Soviet Union

Marshals of the Soviet Union Trivia Quiz


The rank of Marshal of the Soviet Union was established in 1935. Here are questions on ten of the forty-one men who held the office.

A multiple-choice quiz by El_Raton. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
El_Raton
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
281,920
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
517
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. This Soviet military was promoted to the rank of Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1943, during his tenure as Chief of the General Staff ('Stavka'). In February 1945, he was appointed commander of the 3rd Belarussian Front, which invaded East Prussia. After victory over Germany, he led the successful assault against Japanese troops in Manchuria and Korea during operation August Storm. Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. This early companion of Stalin from the Russian Civil War era was appointed People's Commissar for Defence in 1934 and Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1935. He displayed monumental incompetence during the Winter War against Finland in 1939-1940. He was replaced by Stalin himself as Defence Commissar. Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. When this military commander became Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1935 at age 42, he was perhaps the man with the most modern vision of warfare in the Red Army. His strategy of deep operations using armor and aviation was slowly adopted by the Red Army through the 1930s. However, he was purged and executed during the infamous Moscow trials in 1937. Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. As head of the Central Front during the German offensive of 1941, he was forced to retreat all the way to Moscow. In 1942, he faced a serious setback during the battle of Kharkov, when he failed to break the German advance. He was then retired from frontline duty. Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Born in Georgia in 1879, an early revolutionary in the Russian Revolution, companion of Lenin, in the 1920s this man became the most powerful man in the Soviet Union as Secretary General of the Communist Party. His nomination as Marshal of the Soviet Union in March of 1943 was political. Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. He was a field commander of extraordinary skill and bravery, who was responsible for halting the German advance on Moscow in 1941, planning Operation Uranus which trapped the 6th German Army in Stalingrad in 1942, and lifting the siege of Leningrad in 1944. Holding every possible distinction in the Soviet Union, he was also inducted to the Order of the Bath in the United Kingdom and to the Legion of Merit in the USA. Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. An extremely gifted military commander of Polish origin, his armies crushed the remainder of the Sixth German Army at Stalingrad. He became leader of the First Belarussian front after showing outstanding leadership during the Battle of Kursk. He then led his armies through Belarus, Poland, Prussia, all the way to Mecklenburg. By then he had become the 14th Marshal of the Soviet Union. Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. This Russian field commander came to preeminence as commander of the First Ukrainian Front, which swept through the Ukraine, then Poland, Belarus and Czechoslovakia. His units were the first to enter Berlin in 1945. He then linked with Patton's 3rd Army in Torgau, and then moved south to liberate. Prague. He had been made a Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1944. Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. This commander of Armenian origin was the first non-slavic Soviet general to lead an Army Front during the Great Patriotic War, namely the 1st Baltic Front. In 1944, during operation Bagration, his armies swept through Belarus, and then through Latvia and Lithuania. He was named Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1955. Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. This little-known Soviet field commander held the German advance in the Pripiat marshes in Belarus at a critical moment in 1941 as head of the Volkhov Front. He then helped to relieve Leningrad from the German siege. In 1944, he was transferred to the Karelian Front, in which he was faced with strong Finnish resistance. He was named Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1944. Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This Soviet military was promoted to the rank of Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1943, during his tenure as Chief of the General Staff ('Stavka'). In February 1945, he was appointed commander of the 3rd Belarussian Front, which invaded East Prussia. After victory over Germany, he led the successful assault against Japanese troops in Manchuria and Korea during operation August Storm.

Answer: Aleksandr Vasilevsky

Vasilevsky was a most efficient and dedicated Army Staff worker, and his coordination efforts led to the success of the major Soviet operations (the entrapment of the sixth German Army in Stalingrad, the counter-offensives in Ukraine following the Battle of Kursk, Operation Bagration, and the push in Germany in 1945). Overall, one could compare his tasks and impact on the war to those of George C. Marshall, the US Army Chief of Staff.

In February 1945, he replaced the late General Cherniakovsky who had been killed in action as head of the 3rd Belarussian front, thereby leaving the post of Chief of the General Staff to General Antonov.

A very intelligent and able man, Vasilevsky was, however, too timid to oppose the views of Stalin, which led to disaster in the earlier part of the war. Zhukov and Rokossovsky were more successful in that respect.
2. This early companion of Stalin from the Russian Civil War era was appointed People's Commissar for Defence in 1934 and Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1935. He displayed monumental incompetence during the Winter War against Finland in 1939-1940. He was replaced by Stalin himself as Defence Commissar.

Answer: Kliment Voroshilov

Kliment Voroshilov was a quintessential aparatchik of the Communist Party, whose personal loyalty to Stalin allowed him to reach a position of power he was wholly unfit for.

Beria was also an early companion of Stalin who headed the NKVD, the Commisariat for Internal Affairs. Since this ministry controlled the Secret State Police, the Counter-intelligence service, the Gulag prison system and the State borders, Beria was immensely powerful.
3. When this military commander became Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1935 at age 42, he was perhaps the man with the most modern vision of warfare in the Red Army. His strategy of deep operations using armor and aviation was slowly adopted by the Red Army through the 1930s. However, he was purged and executed during the infamous Moscow trials in 1937.

Answer: Mikhail Tukhachevsky

The Red Army suffered greatly from the purges of 1937-1939, especially through the loss of competent high ranking officers. This was one of the reasons of the terrible defeats the Soviet Union experienced during the German invasion in 1941.
4. As head of the Central Front during the German offensive of 1941, he was forced to retreat all the way to Moscow. In 1942, he faced a serious setback during the battle of Kharkov, when he failed to break the German advance. He was then retired from frontline duty.

Answer: Semyon Timoshenko

Although his actions as a field commander met with marginal success or sometimes total defeat, one must not forget that Timoshenko was greatly responsible for the mechanization of the Red Army.

Sergei Biriuzov and Leonid Govorov were high ranking officers of the Soviet Army during WWII, and became Marshals of the Soviet Union.
5. Born in Georgia in 1879, an early revolutionary in the Russian Revolution, companion of Lenin, in the 1920s this man became the most powerful man in the Soviet Union as Secretary General of the Communist Party. His nomination as Marshal of the Soviet Union in March of 1943 was political.

Answer: Josef Stalin

Kamenev, one of the last remaining companions of Lenin, was assassinated on Stalin's orders.

Kalinin was the Premier of the Soviet Union, which meant he was officially the head of government. However, Stalin, as Secretary General of the Communist Party, effectively controlled most of the state apparatus.
6. He was a field commander of extraordinary skill and bravery, who was responsible for halting the German advance on Moscow in 1941, planning Operation Uranus which trapped the 6th German Army in Stalingrad in 1942, and lifting the siege of Leningrad in 1944. Holding every possible distinction in the Soviet Union, he was also inducted to the Order of the Bath in the United Kingdom and to the Legion of Merit in the USA.

Answer: Georgy Zhukov

Perhaps Zhukov's greatest claim to fame was his conduct Operation Bagration, which completely annihilated the German centre in 1944. He remains a contreversial figure, mostly because of his alleged disregard for the lives of his soldiers. However, he did spend more time than any military leader training his troops, and his casualty rates were somewhat lower than those of military leaders in comparable theaters of operation. After the war, he was swept aside by Stalin, who was wary of his popularity.

He then became Minister of Defence under Khrushchev, but was later dismissed. He died in 1974.
7. An extremely gifted military commander of Polish origin, his armies crushed the remainder of the Sixth German Army at Stalingrad. He became leader of the First Belarussian front after showing outstanding leadership during the Battle of Kursk. He then led his armies through Belarus, Poland, Prussia, all the way to Mecklenburg. By then he had become the 14th Marshal of the Soviet Union.

Answer: Konstantin Rokossovsky

Stalin's hatred of Poland had always made him suspicious of Rokossovski, due to his Polish origins. During the Great Purges of 1937-1938, Rokossovski was personally interrogated by Beria, the head of the NKVD. He was tortured, and faced mock executions three times, by all accounts a most traumatic experience. It is to his credit that he became so pre-eminent in the Soviet war effort following these disgusting maneuvers by the Soviet political police.

After the war, he became Minister of Defence of Poland, then Deputy Chairman of the Council of Ministers, but resigned due to conflicts with Polish leaders and went back to the USSR in 1956. He was much chagrined to be perceived as a Pole in Russia, and as a Russian in Poland. He died in 1968, at age 74.
8. This Russian field commander came to preeminence as commander of the First Ukrainian Front, which swept through the Ukraine, then Poland, Belarus and Czechoslovakia. His units were the first to enter Berlin in 1945. He then linked with Patton's 3rd Army in Torgau, and then moved south to liberate. Prague. He had been made a Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1944.

Answer: Ivan Konev

Konev was by all accounts an extremely intelligent and brutal man, which attracted him the sympathy of Stalin. However, he was demoted following the war, and had to wait the Khrushchev-era before he returned to preeminence.
9. This commander of Armenian origin was the first non-slavic Soviet general to lead an Army Front during the Great Patriotic War, namely the 1st Baltic Front. In 1944, during operation Bagration, his armies swept through Belarus, and then through Latvia and Lithuania. He was named Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1955.

Answer: Hovhannes Bagramyan

During his push through Latvia and Lithuania, his actions destroyed the capability of the German Army Group North, which was stuck in the Courland peninsula until May 1945. Bagramyan conducted anti-guerilla warfare in the Lituanian forests shortly after the war.

Hamazasp Babadzhanian and Armeniak Khanferiants were high ranking Soviet military leaders, but they never became Marshals of the Soviet Union.

Ivan Knunyants was a Soviet chemist who discovered nylon independently from Caruthers in the USA.
10. This little-known Soviet field commander held the German advance in the Pripiat marshes in Belarus at a critical moment in 1941 as head of the Volkhov Front. He then helped to relieve Leningrad from the German siege. In 1944, he was transferred to the Karelian Front, in which he was faced with strong Finnish resistance. He was named Marshal of the Soviet Union in 1944.

Answer: Kirill Meretskov

Incredible as it may sound, in September 1941 Meretskov was falsely accused of treason by Beria, arrested and tortured. Some weeks later he was released by order of Stalin, who asked him casually how he felt and reinstated him.
Source: Author El_Raton

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