FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about The British Invasion
Quiz about The British Invasion

The British Invasion Trivia Quiz


Those of a certain age think of The Sixties and The Beatles and such. Ah, but there's more - and some of it not so harmonious. Ten questions about prior Anglo-American exchanges, cultural and otherwise.

A multiple-choice quiz by ignotus999. Estimated time: 7 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. History Trivia
  6. »
  7. U.S. History
  8. »
  9. Difficult U.S. History

Author
ignotus999
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
361,382
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
4 / 10
Plays
713
Last 3 plays: Guest 47 (2/10), Kabdanis (3/10), GoodwinPD (10/10).
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. 1849: A British "invasion" of Manhattan leaves 25 dead and over 100 injured. What causes this tragedy? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. 1784: Samuel Seabury travels to Scotland, to obtain something Americans can't get in England. He begins using it in 1785 in Middletown, Connecticut. What were the Brits keeping from us Yanks? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. 1963: This frequent and friendly British visitor to American shores becomes an honorary citizen of the United States. Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Circa 1817: British Rear Admiral Sir George Cockburn poses for an heroic full-length portrait. At his direction, the artist paints a background scene sure to anger red-blooded Americans. Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. 1981: This play performed by (mostly) British invaders is variously reviewed as "dead weight" or a "middlebrow enterprise" or the "experience of a lifetime." It costs Broadway theatregoers $100 per ticket (in 1981!) to find out. Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. 1861-1862: British troops gather in Canada for a potential invasion of the United States - but cooler heads prevail. What's all this then? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. 1775: 'twas the 18th of April ... The British are coming ... One if by land and two if by sea ... How many lights shine from the steeple of the Old North Church, and why? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. 1879: On December 30th, The Pirates of Penzance premieres at a modest theatre in Paignton, England, but runs for only one performance. (It returns in London after a short interval.) On December 31st, Pirates enjoys a smash American opening in Manhattan - with a different cast, of course - running for 100 performances. Why the abbreviated first run in the U.K. and the long run in the U.S.? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. 1958: The first regularly-scheduled nonstop transatlantic jet service between London and New York City begins on October 4th. Which airline and aircraft pave the Anglo-American highway in the sky? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The 1970s: The Beatles invaded America in the '60s, but this British television series takes American TV screens by storm, winning the Emmy Award for Best Drama in 1974, 1975 and 1977. Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Mar 26 2024 : Guest 47: 2/10
Mar 14 2024 : Kabdanis: 3/10
Mar 14 2024 : GoodwinPD: 10/10
Mar 14 2024 : paper_aero: 5/10
Mar 14 2024 : rainbowriver: 7/10
Feb 28 2024 : Guest 24: 5/10
Feb 26 2024 : Reamar42: 5/10
Feb 24 2024 : Guest 73: 2/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. 1849: A British "invasion" of Manhattan leaves 25 dead and over 100 injured. What causes this tragedy?

Answer: Theatrical performances

The Astor Place Riot of May 10, 1849 was sparked by partisans of American Shakesperean actor Edwin Forrest. The distinguished British tragedian William Macready was performing Macbeth in New York City. A crowd of several thousand Forrest supporters gathered outside the theater - they would never have spelled it theatre; too English.

The rioters were eventually dispersed by volleys from police and the militia, who also sustained casualties. Today, the Riot is regarded as a manifestation of anti-English feeling among the lower classes in mid-19th century America.
2. 1784: Samuel Seabury travels to Scotland, to obtain something Americans can't get in England. He begins using it in 1785 in Middletown, Connecticut. What were the Brits keeping from us Yanks?

Answer: Consecration as an Anglican Bishop

As of 1784, Anglican Bishops had to swear allegiance to the British monarch. Seabury wouldn't take the oath. Some Scottish Bishops were "non-juring"; they didn't take the Oath of Supremacy either. On November 14, 1784 the Scots Bishops consecrated Seabury as the first Anglican Bishop to serve abroad. In 1785, Bishop Seabury performed the first Anglican ordinations on American soil.

One Bishop wasn't enough, however: it takes three Bishops to consecrate a new Bishop. So ... in 1786, Parliament passed a statute allowing consecration for service abroad without requiring the oath. In 1787, two more American Bishops were consecrated - this time in England - and what became the Episcopal Church in the United States finally had its quorum.
3. 1963: This frequent and friendly British visitor to American shores becomes an honorary citizen of the United States.

Answer: Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill's mother was born in Brooklyn, NY but later became a British subject. Churchill was the first individual to be granted honorary citizenship by Act of Congress (and Presidential proclamation). Later federal honorees include the redoubtable Anglo-American couple of William Penn and his wife Hannah - both of whom died long before the unpleasantness of 1776, and were honored posthumously.

Some foreign notables, such as "Baron" Von Steuben, were granted citizenship by State legislatures, but Churchill was the first federal honoree.
4. Circa 1817: British Rear Admiral Sir George Cockburn poses for an heroic full-length portrait. At his direction, the artist paints a background scene sure to anger red-blooded Americans.

Answer: The burning of Washington, DC

The burning of Washington in 1814 was purportedly in retaliation for American destruction of private property during the ill-fated invasion of Canada during the War of 1812. The fire would have spread further but for a sudden torrential rainstorm.
5. 1981: This play performed by (mostly) British invaders is variously reviewed as "dead weight" or a "middlebrow enterprise" or the "experience of a lifetime." It costs Broadway theatregoers $100 per ticket (in 1981!) to find out.

Answer: The Life & Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby

The Royal Shakespeare Company; two installements; eight and a half hours; many cast members played multiple parts. The ticket price was extremely high for Broadway in those days, even though it included both parts of the play. American critics were ambivalent, but American audiences were enthusiastic.
6. 1861-1862: British troops gather in Canada for a potential invasion of the United States - but cooler heads prevail. What's all this then?

Answer: The Trent Affair

Rebel emissaries James Mason and John Slidell intended to travel to the United Kingdom and France to seek diplomatic recognition for Confederate government. Evading the Union blockade, they reached Cuba and embarked on the British mail packet RMS Trent.

The Union frigate USS San Jacinto, under the command of Captain Charles Wilkes, stopped and boarded the Trent. Wilkes seized the two men as "contraband." Adroit diplomacy and the release of the prisoners avoided war.
7. 1775: 'twas the 18th of April ... The British are coming ... One if by land and two if by sea ... How many lights shine from the steeple of the Old North Church, and why?

Answer: Two - the lobsterbacks are crossing the Charles River in boats!

The route "by land" would have taken the British from Boston via Boston Neck to the Great Bridge over the Charles River. Instead, British forces crossed the Charles River by boat. Paul Revere arranged the signal system. The lights were displayed for only a minute or two, to avoid attracting attention from the British garrison already occupying Boston. Oh, and lobsters aren't red until after they're cooked.
8. 1879: On December 30th, The Pirates of Penzance premieres at a modest theatre in Paignton, England, but runs for only one performance. (It returns in London after a short interval.) On December 31st, Pirates enjoys a smash American opening in Manhattan - with a different cast, of course - running for 100 performances. Why the abbreviated first run in the U.K. and the long run in the U.S.?

Answer: Copyright laws

Given the operetta's setting, the beautiful coastal town of Paignton, Devon was a good choice! There were no international copyright laws in those days, and Gilbert & Sullivan works were often pirated (pun intended). The U.S. and English copyrights depended on the date of first performance, so the show had to open almost simultaneously in the U.S., England and France to forestall unauthorized versions.

It didn't work, though: pirated Pirates performances began within a few months. The principals in the U.S. production included English, Irish and American performers.
9. 1958: The first regularly-scheduled nonstop transatlantic jet service between London and New York City begins on October 4th. Which airline and aircraft pave the Anglo-American highway in the sky?

Answer: BOAC - De Havilland Comet

The very British Comet first entered commercial service in 1952. British Overseas Airways Corporation's rival Pan American World Airways began regular transatlantic service on October 26, 1958 - but on the New York to Paris run, with a refueling stop in Newfoundland. No matter: London - New York remains by far the most popular transatlantic itinerary.
10. The 1970s: The Beatles invaded America in the '60s, but this British television series takes American TV screens by storm, winning the Emmy Award for Best Drama in 1974, 1975 and 1977.

Answer: Upstairs, Downstairs

Americans often associate Britain with great stage drama, but British television productions have long been popular in the U.S. as well. Upstairs, Downstairs portrayed the lives of a wealthy London family and their servants from 1903 through the 1930s.

Not Downton Abbey, but not down-market either. Like many British imports before the advent of cable TV, "Upstairs, Downstairs" was shown on the Public Broadcasting Service in the United States. This was ironic, because the series was produced by London Weekend Television (a private company) and not the public service BBC.

A revival of the series by the Beeb in 2010 was less successful.
Source: Author ignotus999

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
4/19/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us