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Quiz about You from Jersey
Quiz about You from Jersey

You from Jersey? Trivia Quiz


What exit? Twenty questions about the real history of The Garden State -- and nothing about the Turnpike. Or the Parkway. Or Interstate 80.

A multiple-choice quiz by ignotus. Estimated time: 9 mins.
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Author
ignotus
Time
9 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
259,910
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
20
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
10 / 20
Plays
1664
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 61 (11/20), TPO0831 (7/20), Guest 71 (15/20).
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Question 1 of 20
1. Long before the Turnpike, this Native American group inhabited much of present-day NJ. Hint


Question 2 of 20
2. Who were the first permanent European settlers in present-day NJ? Hint


Question 3 of 20
3. We all know NJ is named for the Island of Jersey in the English Channel, right? Yeah, right. Why? Hint


Question 4 of 20
4. Between 1674 and 1702, NJ was actually two colonies: "East Jersey" and "West Jersey." Why the split? Hint


Question 5 of 20
5. This venerable educational institution was founded in 1746 in Elizabeth, as "The College of New Jersey." Hint


Question 6 of 20
6. New Jersey adopted its first State Constitution on July 2, 1776. So sue me for a couple days; at least we got it done. Which of the following was true of the Constitution of '76? Hint


Question 7 of 20
7. Molly Pitcher is a NJ heroine of the American Revolution. OK, maybe she's not completely historical, but you gonna say that to me?! According to legend, at which battle did she bring water to the troops -- and help load a cannon when her husband was wounded? Hint


Question 8 of 20
8. You remember Washington Crossing the Delaware, right. Well, he was coming to NJ -- but not for a vacation. According to legend, which of these unusual circumstances aided in Washington's victory at the Battle of Trenton on December 26, 1776? Hint


Question 9 of 20
9. 1804 was a bad year for NJ's reputation: Aaron Burr shot and killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel. They didn't do it in New York for fear of being arrested. Where did the duel take place? Hint


Question 10 of 20
10. 1804 was a good year for NJ's reputation -- and high time, too. Why? Hint


Question 11 of 20
11. New Jersey schools are required by law to celebrate "Commodore Barry Day," commemorating the "Father of the United States Navy." Yeah, it's the law. N.J.S.A. 18A:36-10 et seq. Look it up. If you weren't absent that day, you'd know why this is strange. Hint


Question 12 of 20
12. One step forward, two steps back. The NJ State Constitution of 1776 granted this right; the Constitution of 1844 abolished it. Hint


Question 13 of 20
13. There were four major candidates for President in the fateful election of 1860. Who received a majority of the NJ popular vote -- but not a majority of its Electoral College votes? Hint


Question 14 of 20
14. This Civil War General later served as Governor of New Jersey. Yeah, I know he wasn't born here. Hint


Question 15 of 20
15. This NJ city was founded by the Society for Useful Manufactures. Better than Useless Manufactures, right? Although nicknamed "Silk City" in the 19th century, it was also the home of the Colt Firearms Company. Hint


Question 16 of 20
16. From 1907 to 1910, most of the movies filmed in America were made in this NJ location. Hint


Question 17 of 20
17. New Jersey boasts several "firsts" in the history of American sports. Which of these events took place in NJ? Hint


Question 18 of 20
18. Greetings from Asbury Park! This NJ Shore town began as a summer meeting place for Methodists, but quickly achieved wide and general popularity. In September of 1934, folks got more than they expected from their late summer holiday at the beach. Hint


Question 19 of 20
19. New Jersey is linked with New York, for better or worse -- and it's some of each. Which of the following was the first direct automobile route across the Hudson River between NJ and Manhattan? Hint


Question 20 of 20
20. In 1998, NJ won a legal victory over New York. What was it? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jul 03 2024 : Guest 61: 11/20
Jun 21 2024 : TPO0831: 7/20
Jun 20 2024 : Guest 71: 15/20
Jun 07 2024 : Guest 206: 9/20

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Long before the Turnpike, this Native American group inhabited much of present-day NJ.

Answer: The Lenni-Lenape.

Erroneously called "Delawares" by Europeans, the Lenni-Lenape (or Lenape) presaged modern NJ residents by leading a mobile life. Many spent the summer "down the Shore," enjoying the mild climate and abundant seafood. "Ho-Ho-Kus" is a real town in NJ -- the phrase probably meant "red cedar" in Lenape -- where about 5% of the current population are Native Americans.
2. Who were the first permanent European settlers in present-day NJ?

Answer: The Dutch and the Swedes. Oh, ja!

The Dutch thought of the place as an adjunct to their colony on Manhattan Island. That view persists today among certain misguided individuals. The colony of New Sweden was located in the southwest. Can you say Nya Elfsborg, New Jersey? They ran afoul of Peter Stuyvesant, the Dutchman from Manhattan, who annexed the Swedish colony to New Netherland in 1655.

It's cool, though. The British were ready to rumble with Pete.
3. We all know NJ is named for the Island of Jersey in the English Channel, right? Yeah, right. Why?

Answer: Jersey supported the Royalists during the English Civil War.

Luckily, the Isle of Dogs sided with Parliament. The Island of Jersey supported Charles I and his son Charles II. Chuck the Two -- er, Charles II -- gave a huge tract of land in North America to his brother, the Duke of York. The Duke carved out "New Jersey" from the land between the Hudson and Delaware Rivers, and gave it to his Royalist buddies Sir George Carteret and Lord Berkeley.

There were no Amboy Dukes until the late 20th century.
4. Between 1674 and 1702, NJ was actually two colonies: "East Jersey" and "West Jersey." Why the split?

Answer: Some colonists didn't pay their rent .

During the late 17th century, New Jersey was a "proprietary colony," meaning that the colonists paid land rent ("quitrents") to the proprietors of the colony. By 1673, the rent for western and southern New Jersey was seriously overdue. Instead of trying to collect it, Lord Berkeley sold his half of New Jersey to the Quakers for quick cash.

The Quaker part, contiguous to Pennsylvania, became "West Jersey." In 1702, the two parts were reunited when New Jersey became a royal colony under Good Queen Anne.
5. This venerable educational institution was founded in 1746 in Elizabeth, as "The College of New Jersey."

Answer: Princeton University.

The college was almost named after the Royal Governor of New Jersey -- a gentleman named Belcher. Seriously. The college moved to Princeton in 1756, but only adopted the name Princeton University in 1896. The current "College of New Jersey" in Ewing Township was founded as the "New Jersey State Normal School" in 1855.

After a stint as "Trenton State College," it became "The College of New Jersey" in 1996. Rutgers' subtitle is "The State University of New Jersey." Confused? Forget about it!
6. New Jersey adopted its first State Constitution on July 2, 1776. So sue me for a couple days; at least we got it done. Which of the following was true of the Constitution of '76?

Answer: It granted the vote to women as well as men.

The 1776 Constitution enfranchised women as well as free non-whites. It blurred the "separation of powers" in several ways. The Governor was appointed by the legislature instead of being elected. The Governor and the Legislative Council formed the state's highest court.
7. Molly Pitcher is a NJ heroine of the American Revolution. OK, maybe she's not completely historical, but you gonna say that to me?! According to legend, at which battle did she bring water to the troops -- and help load a cannon when her husband was wounded?

Answer: The Battle of Monmouth.

Her real name remains a subject of debate. A few cynics (probably New Yorkers) claim she's just a legend. The true believers all say she served at the Battle of Monmouth on June 28, 1778. The battle was fought near the county seat of Monmouth County -- then called "Monmouth Court House"; now Freehold, NJ. Today the battlefield is a park, featuring annual re-enactments starring Molly herself. Really.
8. You remember Washington Crossing the Delaware, right. Well, he was coming to NJ -- but not for a vacation. According to legend, which of these unusual circumstances aided in Washington's victory at the Battle of Trenton on December 26, 1776?

Answer: Some of the Hessian troops were hung-over.

"Hessians" was the generic term for German troops who fought for the British. Tradition has it that the Hessian garrison at Trenton over-indulged in celebrating Christmas, thinking that the rag-tag rebel army could not attack. (There is some recent scholarship indicating that the Hessians were better-prepared than that, but Washington still triumphed.) Although some colonists feared and loathed the German troops, many "Hessians" decided to settle in the US after the war.

Their farming skills (and maybe their taste in beverages) helped them to assimilate.
9. 1804 was a bad year for NJ's reputation: Aaron Burr shot and killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel. They didn't do it in New York for fear of being arrested. Where did the duel take place?

Answer: On the Weehawken Heights overlooking Manhattan.

Weehawken was a sadly popular place for duels -- an easy commute from Manhattan by ferry across the Hudson River. Today, the site of the duel is a public park with a spectacular view of the city's skyline.
10. 1804 was a good year for NJ's reputation -- and high time, too. Why?

Answer: NJ (finally) abolished slavery.

New Jersey was the last northern state to abolish slavery. The process was "gradual emancipation," however. Most slaves were not legally free until approximately 1830. As late as 1865, there were still about a dozen African-American "apprenticed freedmen" in the State.

Despite these challenges, free African-Americans established several thriving communities in NJ prior to the Civil War.
11. New Jersey schools are required by law to celebrate "Commodore Barry Day," commemorating the "Father of the United States Navy." Yeah, it's the law. N.J.S.A. 18A:36-10 et seq. Look it up. If you weren't absent that day, you'd know why this is strange.

Answer: He wasn't from NJ.

Commodore John Barry (1745-1803) was born in Ireland, emigrated to the colonies, and established himself as a prosperous sea captain -- in Philadelphia. He fought in the Revolution, later received commission number 1 in the new US Navy, and was its senior captain.

He was instrumental in founding the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He deserves to be remembered, though his connection with NJ is rather tenuous.
12. One step forward, two steps back. The NJ State Constitution of 1776 granted this right; the Constitution of 1844 abolished it.

Answer: Votes for women.

The Constitution of 1776 granted the right to vote to women and also to non-white men. The 1844 Constitution limited the vote to white males. On the positive side, the 1844 Constitution included a Bill of Rights (for some people, anyway), direct election of the Governor, and a clear separation of powers among the three branches of State government.
13. There were four major candidates for President in the fateful election of 1860. Who received a majority of the NJ popular vote -- but not a majority of its Electoral College votes?

Answer: Stephen Douglas.

Douglas actually won the popular vote in NJ by approximately 52% to 48% for Lincoln. The State's 7 Electoral College votes were divided 4 for Lincoln and 3 for Douglas. Douglas ran second in most States, losing to Lincoln in the North, to Breckenridge in most of the South, and to Bell in Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. Douglas received Electoral College votes only from NJ and the border slave state of Missouri.
14. This Civil War General later served as Governor of New Jersey. Yeah, I know he wasn't born here.

Answer: George McClellan, of the Philadelphia McClellans.

George Brinton McClellan (1826-1885) won NJ's vote in 1864, but lost the Presidential Election overwhelmingly to Abraham Lincoln. While his military skills are debatable, he was a popular Governor, serving from 1878 to 1881. His son, George B. McClellan Jr., defected across the Hudson and served as Mayor of New York City from 1904 to 1909.
15. This NJ city was founded by the Society for Useful Manufactures. Better than Useless Manufactures, right? Although nicknamed "Silk City" in the 19th century, it was also the home of the Colt Firearms Company.

Answer: Paterson.

Prior to electricity -- Tom Edison, Jersey Boy! -- water power was critical for heavy industry. The factories of Paterson harnessed the 77-foot drop of the Great Falls on the Passaic River Not Niagara Falls, but way good enough.
16. From 1907 to 1910, most of the movies filmed in America were made in this NJ location.

Answer: Fort Lee.

Thomas Edison built his first motion picture "studio" in West Orange, but it was little more than a large black box. The studio that is, not West Orange.

Once movie cameras became more mobile, Fort Lee beckoned with its reliable sunshine (seriously), proximity to New York City, and variety of nearby scenery. Beginning in 1907, over a dozen major production companies built or leased studios in Fort Lee.

In 1911, the Nestor film company (ironically, a NJ-based firm) built the first studio in Hollywood, California. The rest is history -- California history. Thanks, Nestor!
17. New Jersey boasts several "firsts" in the history of American sports. Which of these events took place in NJ?

Answer: The first recorded baseball game (1846).

In September of 1845, Alexander Cartwright published a set of rules for "Base Ball" (a.k.a. "The New York Game") for his team, the Kickerbocker Base Ball Club. During the fall of 1845, the Knickerbockers practiced the new game at the Elysian Fields in Hoboken, making it the first Spring Training facility (?).

The epic first official game was played there on June 19, 1846 against a club known as the New York Nine -- consisting chiefly of former Knicks who quit the team because they didn't like practicing in NJ.

The New York Nine won 23-1. New York, New York, New York ... we've got the Giants and the Jets, anyway.
18. Greetings from Asbury Park! This NJ Shore town began as a summer meeting place for Methodists, but quickly achieved wide and general popularity. In September of 1934, folks got more than they expected from their late summer holiday at the beach.

Answer: A smoldering ocean liner aground just off shore.

The Morro Castle was returning from a cruise to Cuba when she caught fire. The ship continued northward along the NJ coast, coming to rest off Asbury Park. The exact cause of the fire remains a mystery, though arson was suspected.
19. New Jersey is linked with New York, for better or worse -- and it's some of each. Which of the following was the first direct automobile route across the Hudson River between NJ and Manhattan?

Answer: The Holland Tunnel.

The Holland Tunnel (opened in 1927) was first conceived as a bridge, in 1906. Planning shifted to a tunnel in 1913, when it was determined that a bridge would have to be at least 200 feet high, and the cost of buying the land on the Manhattan side would be prohibitive.

It was originally to be called "The Hudson River Vehicular Tunnel." It was re-named in memory of its principal designer, Clifford Holland, who died before the tunnel was completed.
20. In 1998, NJ won a legal victory over New York. What was it?

Answer: Most of Ellis Island was declared part of NJ.

The entire island is on the NJ side of the Hudson River. Don't believe me? Go swim! Before the American Revolution, New York seized the island, and NJ didn't counter-attack. In 1834, NJ formally admitted New York's control.

But hang on, there: after the agreement, the federal government enlarged the island by 90%, through dredging and landfills. In 1998, the US Supreme Court ruled that NJ "owned" the artificial portion of the island, since it didn't exist in 1834. This was a problem, because some of the buildings are split by the new state border. New Jersey and New York agreed to "share" the island -- which is entirely federal property anyway.
Source: Author ignotus

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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