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Quiz about When We Were Young  Toys and Games
Quiz about When We Were Young  Toys and Games

When We Were Young - Toys and Games Quiz


The Scrambled Eggheads team take a trip down memory lane and bring you a quiz on our favourite toys and games when we were kids.

A multiple-choice quiz by Team The Scrambled Eggheads. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
Plodd
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
343,130
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
6109
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 125 (5/10), Guest 70 (9/10), callie_ross (3/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This was a great, cost free game played in Australia. Three sticks were placed, initially one foot's length apart, on the ground. The spaces between got progressively larger and once you took more than three steps in between each stick, you were out. What was this flying game called in Oz? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. This schoolyard activity involved one piece of equipment, sometimes two if we were more daring, and the group of us girls involved could often be heard chanting something about "Cinderella, dressed in yellow . . ." What were we doing with our recess time? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Which favourite children's game included onesies, twosies, threesies, foursies, fivesies and so on up to tensies? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In playgrounds in Aussie primary schools we used to stand almost toe-to-toe and stretch out a clenched hand. What might this game be called? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. This game was a childhood favourite of mine. All you needed was a surface, chalk and a small token. It involved jumping on one or two feet.
Can you name this game?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. This outside activity had two lines of players that stood about thirty feet apart. The two lines faced each other with the players in each line joining hands. One side would yell to the other to send over a player, and that player would run as hard as possible hoping to break through at a pair of joined hands. What game were we playing? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This game was played with a small round object which came attached in its centre to a long piece of string - can you guess it? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. This was played by usually placing the object around your waist, but may be used on the limbs or neck. You then moved about keeping the object in place.
What was being played with?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. The idea of this game was to vault over others. Other children would stoop over and allow somebody to jump over them. What was the game called? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. In the early 70s, this toy consisted of two hard small plastic balls hanging down on two strings, and when you swung them up and down they made a loud noise. What was the name of these popular toys? Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This was a great, cost free game played in Australia. Three sticks were placed, initially one foot's length apart, on the ground. The spaces between got progressively larger and once you took more than three steps in between each stick, you were out. What was this flying game called in Oz?

Answer: Fly

Kids took part in playing Fly, simply by lining up behind each other and taking turns to take steps between the sticks. The first few rounds were easy, and, when the last person took his or her turn, the last stick was moved out to where his or her back leg landed. Then we all turned round and jumped back the other way. That way the spaces between each stick grew larger...and larger...and l..a..r..g..e..r. If you took more than one space between the sticks, you moved up to having to take two steps each time between them - and then on to three steps. Once you took more than three steps, out you went until only the winner remained.

(Question and additional information submitted by Creedy)
2. This schoolyard activity involved one piece of equipment, sometimes two if we were more daring, and the group of us girls involved could often be heard chanting something about "Cinderella, dressed in yellow . . ." What were we doing with our recess time?

Answer: Jumping rope

Jumping or skipping rope was a favorite recess activity, and we had several rhymes to keep track of how many jumps we accomplished before we missed and were out. I was especially proud when I learn to jump Double Dutch which uses two turning ropes. The origins of jump roping are a bit unclear - ancient Egyptians, Australian aborigines, maybe the Chinese, but today it has gone far beyond the playground and is now an organized competitive sport.

(Question and additional information submitted by unterkircher)
3. Which favourite children's game included onesies, twosies, threesies, foursies, fivesies and so on up to tensies?

Answer: Jacks

The game consists of a small rubber ball and ten metal or plastic jacks. The jacks are thrown on to a flat surface. The first up in the game will toss the ball in the air, pick up a jack with the same hand, and catch the ball when it rebounds off the surface. This is called a "onesie". The game is repeated until all ten jacks are picked up. The jacks are then thrown back down again and this time you have to pick up two jacks (twosies) at a time. The game is completed and the winner crowned when all ten jacks (tensies) are picked up in one hand. If you fail to catch the ball or the ball bounces more than once then the next player has a turn.

(Question and additional information submitted by Plodd)
4. In playgrounds in Aussie primary schools we used to stand almost toe-to-toe and stretch out a clenched hand. What might this game be called?

Answer: Knuckles

As 'interesting information' it can only be termed as painful. Each took it in turn to strike like a cobra and suddenly smack down with his clenched fist on the others knuckles. You could avoid it by a simultaneous backward retreat, but if you did that ahead of the 'strike' then the other guy got to have another go. If folk wonder why such a small nation in terms of population is so successful in competitive sports, well it probably all started in the playground.

(Question and additional information submitted by Airmale)
5. This game was a childhood favourite of mine. All you needed was a surface, chalk and a small token. It involved jumping on one or two feet. Can you name this game?

Answer: Hopscotch

There are many variations of this game all around the world. In Canada it was usually played on the sidewalk. To play hopscotch you needed to draw ten squares in various patterns with chalk or with a stick if you were playing it on a dirt surface. The first player tosses the marker into the first square. The marker must land completely within the designated square and without touching a line or bouncing out. The player then hops through the course, skipping the square with the marker in it. Upon successfully completing the sequence, the player continues the turn by tossing the marker into square number two, and repeating the pattern. If while hopping through the course
the player steps on a line, misses a square, or loses balance, the turn ends. Players begin their turns where they last left off. The first player to complete one course for every numbered square on the course wins the game.

(Question and interesting information submitted by Eastenders01)
6. This outside activity had two lines of players that stood about thirty feet apart. The two lines faced each other with the players in each line joining hands. One side would yell to the other to send over a player, and that player would run as hard as possible hoping to break through at a pair of joined hands. What game were we playing?

Answer: Red Rover

This childhood game is also called Forcing the City Gates and Octopus Tag and may have started in Great Britain. A couple of rules about the game said teammates could only link hand-to-hand, not hand-to-wrist or hand-to-arm, and that joined hands could not be raised in order to "clothesline" an opponent's throat.

(Question and interesting information submitted by Unterkircher)
7. This game was played with a small round object which came attached in its centre to a long piece of string - can you guess it?

Answer: Yo-yo

You could do all sorts of tricks with a yo-yo once you mastered the trick of keeping it continually in motion. These included "Walk the Dog" and "Round the World" and so on. Playing with the yo-yo was great fun. It could also be highly competitive sometimes if matched up against friends during school recess time and after school to see who could keep his or her yo-yo going the longest.

(Question and interesting information submitted by Creedy)
8. This was played by usually placing the object around your waist, but may be used on the limbs or neck. You then moved about keeping the object in place. What was being played with?

Answer: Hula Hoop

The Hula Hoop has been a type of play and exercise since approximately 500BC, although many people think, wrongly, it was invented in the 1950s. Various materials have been used throughout the years, including dried willow and rattan. In the last fifty years, plastic has normally been used.
Twirling the Hula Hoop is a great way of keeping fit....I just wish I could perform as well now as when I was twelve years old!

(Question and interesting information submitted by veronicavee)
9. The idea of this game was to vault over others. Other children would stoop over and allow somebody to jump over them. What was the game called?

Answer: Leap Frog

Leap Frog is a game we often played at school. The idea is for a line of children to stoop over and allow a another child to vault over them. The person vaulting would leap over the line of children and then stoop down at the finish to carry the line on. The child at the other end would set off and do the same. I, of course was easy to vault over, always being very small! The trouble came for me when I had to vault...

(Question and interesting information submitted by peewee2)
10. In the early 70s, this toy consisted of two hard small plastic balls hanging down on two strings, and when you swung them up and down they made a loud noise. What was the name of these popular toys?

Answer: Clackers

This toy was a favorite in the 1970s and many a knuckle was left bruised and battered from practicing the Clackers. The two hard plastic balls hung from two strings that came off a small ring tab, were about 3cm in circumference and with a slowing starting up and down motion the balls would clack together above and then below the hand, and as you got faster the balls clacked louder (and hurt harder) making the noise almost unbearable.

(Question and additional information by Lorstrivia)
Source: Author Plodd

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor ozzz2002 before going online.
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