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Quiz about You Shook Me All Night Long
Quiz about You Shook Me All Night Long

You Shook Me All Night Long Trivia Quiz


All of these games involve shaking and throwing dice - if you were to play all ten then you'd probably be up all night long doing it! Match each description to the correct game.

A matching quiz by Fifiona81. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Fifiona81
Time
5 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
396,095
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
331
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. You have five standard dice. In each round you get up to three goes at rolling various number combinations, for example a Full House or a Four of a Kind.   
  Yahtzee
2. You have sixteen dice with different letters printed on them in a 4x4 tray. Make as many words as you can using adjacent letters - longer words equal more points!  
  Liar's Dice
3. You have three standard dice. Often played in teams and over multiple tables, you score points for rolling either the number of the round or three matching numbers, or both!   
  Heckmeck
4. You have eight dice showing the numbers 1 to 5 and a worm. You roll repeatedly until you have enough points (and worms) to claim a worm tile. The player with the most worms once all tiles are claimed is the winner.  
  Cho-Han
5. You have five standard dice and a cup to conceal what you have rolled. Players bid in turn on the minimum number of dice showing a given face value in every player's hand and challenge if they think the previous bid was wrong.  
  Kismet
6. You have six standard dice. You have up to six rolls but must keep at least one die unchanged each time. You score the total of your four highest value dice - but only if you hold both a 1 and a 4 at the end of your turn.  
  Boggle
7. You have three dice showing six different symbols. Players bet on which of these symbols will be showing after the three dice are rolled.  
  Macao
8. You have five dice, with the 1 & 6, 2 & 5, and 3 & 4 shown in three different colours. In each round you get up to three goes at rolling various number and colour combinations - many of which are based on poker hand types.  
  Crown and Anchor
9. You have two standard dice and a bamboo cup. Players bet on whether the sum of the two dice when rolled (and hidden under the bamboo cup) is even or odd.  
  Bunco
10. You have one standard die. In turn, each player rolls the die as many times as they want to, but must not exceed a cumulative score of nine. A score of nine exactly wins the game, otherwise the player whose score is closest (but lower) wins.  
  Midnight





Select each answer

1. You have five standard dice. In each round you get up to three goes at rolling various number combinations, for example a Full House or a Four of a Kind.
2. You have sixteen dice with different letters printed on them in a 4x4 tray. Make as many words as you can using adjacent letters - longer words equal more points!
3. You have three standard dice. Often played in teams and over multiple tables, you score points for rolling either the number of the round or three matching numbers, or both!
4. You have eight dice showing the numbers 1 to 5 and a worm. You roll repeatedly until you have enough points (and worms) to claim a worm tile. The player with the most worms once all tiles are claimed is the winner.
5. You have five standard dice and a cup to conceal what you have rolled. Players bid in turn on the minimum number of dice showing a given face value in every player's hand and challenge if they think the previous bid was wrong.
6. You have six standard dice. You have up to six rolls but must keep at least one die unchanged each time. You score the total of your four highest value dice - but only if you hold both a 1 and a 4 at the end of your turn.
7. You have three dice showing six different symbols. Players bet on which of these symbols will be showing after the three dice are rolled.
8. You have five dice, with the 1 & 6, 2 & 5, and 3 & 4 shown in three different colours. In each round you get up to three goes at rolling various number and colour combinations - many of which are based on poker hand types.
9. You have two standard dice and a bamboo cup. Players bet on whether the sum of the two dice when rolled (and hidden under the bamboo cup) is even or odd.
10. You have one standard die. In turn, each player rolls the die as many times as they want to, but must not exceed a cumulative score of nine. A score of nine exactly wins the game, otherwise the player whose score is closest (but lower) wins.

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. You have five standard dice. In each round you get up to three goes at rolling various number combinations, for example a Full House or a Four of a Kind.

Answer: Yahtzee

A standard Yahtzee score sheet consists of 13 different number combinations in two separate sections. In the lower section, players score a set number of points for fulfilling various requirements, such as Full House (two of one number and three of another), Small or Large Straight (either 4 or 5 consecutive numbers), Three or Four of a Kind, or the ultimate aim of the game - a "Yahtzee" or Five of a Kind. In the upper section they score the face value of the total number of 1s, 2s, 3s, 4s, 5s or 6s in their hand. Bonus points are available for scoring over 63 points in the upper section or completing multiple "Yahtzees".

Players need to consider carefully which category of the score sheet to fill in for each hand, especially in the early part of the game, as once a category is used it cannot be updated later in the game if they achieve a better score to put in it. If after three rolls a hand doesn't meet the criteria for any of the remaining open categories, then a zero must be recorded against one of them - so picking which categories to give up on is also an important tactic in this game. The winner is the player with the highest total score after all rounds have been completed.
2. You have sixteen dice with different letters printed on them in a 4x4 tray. Make as many words as you can using adjacent letters - longer words equal more points!

Answer: Boggle

Despite being a dice game, Boggle is all about words rather than numbers. The 16 dice have different letter combinations on them, which cover all 26 letters of the alphabet (although a 'Qu' appears instead of 'Q' given the fact that most English words containing a 'q' need a 'u' as well). After the dice are shaken and settled in the tray, players get three minutes to make as many words as possible from the visible letters. Words have to be traceable across adjacent dice (either horizontally, vertically or diagonally), cannot use the same die more than once and at least three letters long.

Players then compare their lists of words. Any word appearing on the list of more than one player has to be disregarded, but unique words score points depending on their length - for example, a three or four-letter word is worth just one point, but a word of eight or more letters scores 11 points. The player with the most points wins the round.

Other variants of the game have also been released, such as Big Boggle based on a 5x5 grid and Super Big Boggle based on a 6x6 one.
3. You have three standard dice. Often played in teams and over multiple tables, you score points for rolling either the number of the round or three matching numbers, or both!

Answer: Bunco

Bunco gained popularity in the United States in the mid to late 19th century and became synonymous with illegal gambling establishments (which became known as "Bunco parlors") and then later became a popular method of gambling in speakeasys during Prohibition.

The game itself is relatively straightforward and takes place over six rounds - players gain 1 point if one of their three dice shows a '1' in round 1, or a '2' in round 2, etc; 5 points if all three dice show the same number; and 21 points if all three dice show a '1' in round 1, or '2' in round 2, etc.

The latter is known as rolling a "Bunco". However, it becomes more complicated when there are multiple tables worth of players involved in the game, as rules dictating how players (or teams of players) move between the tables come into force - although generally losers have to move to a lower-numbered table, other variations include winners moving up to a higher-numbered one or a mix of the two options.
4. You have eight dice showing the numbers 1 to 5 and a worm. You roll repeatedly until you have enough points (and worms) to claim a worm tile. The player with the most worms once all tiles are claimed is the winner.

Answer: Heckmeck

Heckmeck (otherwise known as Pickomino) is an amusing German dice and tile game. The dice all have a worm where the number 6 would normally be and the tiles are numbered from 21 to 36 and contain anything from 1 to 4 worms (the higher numbers having more worms). Players take turns to roll the dice, choose a number (or worm) and put all dice showing it to one side. They can then choose to roll again, but will run the risk of going bust if they can't roll a different number. Once they have put aside a high enough score and at least one worm, then they can take a worm tile showing a value up to that score from the central "grill". If they do go bust on a roll or don't get a high enough score to claim a tile, then they have to return one (assuming they have any) to the barbecue and the highest remaining numbered tile is turned over and removed from the game. The game ends when all tiles have been claimed or removed from the game and the winner is the player whose collection of worm tiles contains the largest number of worms.

To make things a bit more interesting, players also have the option of stealing worm tiles from their opponents instead of taking fresh tiles from the grill!
5. You have five standard dice and a cup to conceal what you have rolled. Players bid in turn on the minimum number of dice showing a given face value in every player's hand and challenge if they think the previous bid was wrong.

Answer: Liar's Dice

Liar's Dice originates from South America and is also known as Pirate's Dice or Deception Dice as well as by a variety of Spanish names. There are many variant versions of the rules, but a broadly standard game involves players all rolling their dice under a cup so that their opponents can't see what their dice show and then take it in turn to bid, raise or challenge in an attempt to win the round.

For example, if an initial bid was "everyone has two 2s", then the next player could raise by increasing either the quantity or face value of that bid - "everyone has three 2s" or "everyone has two 3s".

The next player could also challenge the bid if they either know it to be wrong (because it contradicts their own hand) or think the probability of it being wrong is high. If a challenge is successful then the challenger wins the round and the last bidder loses one of their dice, or if it fails then the last bidder wins and the challenger loses a die instead.

The overall winner is the final player who still has dice in their hand.
6. You have six standard dice. You have up to six rolls but must keep at least one die unchanged each time. You score the total of your four highest value dice - but only if you hold both a 1 and a 4 at the end of your turn.

Answer: Midnight

Midnight is also known as 1-4-24. This is because the ultimate best hand you can roll is one 1, one 4 and four 6s, the latter of which are the four dice added up to give a total score of 24. It is essentially a very simple game, with the winner being the player who rolls the highest score.

However, it is often extended by adding in a betting element where each player puts in a set stake at the start of the round, with the highest scoring player winning the pot. In the event of a tie, players put another stake in the pot and another round is played - this time with a double jackpot on offer!
7. You have three dice showing six different symbols. Players bet on which of these symbols will be showing after the three dice are rolled.

Answer: Crown and Anchor

Crown and Anchor originated as a past-time for sailors in Britain's Royal Navy in the 18th century - a fact that presumably explains both parts of its title. The three special dice used for the game show the four symbols used on playing cards - a heart, diamond, spade and club - plus a crown and an anchor.

In addition to the players who place bets on the outcome of each roll of the dice, another player takes on the role of the banker who is responsible for collating stakes and paying out the winnings.

The banker wins any stakes associated with lost bets. Like most casino games, the probabilities associated with Crown and Anchor are in the favour of the banker!
8. You have five dice, with the 1 & 6, 2 & 5, and 3 & 4 shown in three different colours. In each round you get up to three goes at rolling various number and colour combinations - many of which are based on poker hand types.

Answer: Kismet

Kismet is a very similar to game to Yahtzee, with the main difference between them being the addition of extra scoring categories based on the colour of the dice, such as rolling two pairs of the same colour or a flush (where all the dice end up showing the same colour). A roll that ends with all the dice showing the same number (and therefore the same colour) is called a Kismet, rather than a Yahtzee.

The game was first published in 1964 and takes its name from the Turkish for "fate".
9. You have two standard dice and a bamboo cup. Players bet on whether the sum of the two dice when rolled (and hidden under the bamboo cup) is even or odd.

Answer: Cho-Han

Cho-Han is a simple Japanese dice game and was traditionally played on a tatami (rice straw) mat. While players could sit how they liked, the dealer was expected to sit in the proper 'seiza' position, which involves kneeling with your lower legs tucked under your thighs and your ankles turned outwards. In English, Cho means 'even' and Han means 'odd'.
10. You have one standard die. In turn, each player rolls the die as many times as they want to, but must not exceed a cumulative score of nine. A score of nine exactly wins the game, otherwise the player whose score is closest (but lower) wins.

Answer: Macao

Macao bears a strong similarity to the card game of the same name, as well as other variants based on different target totals, such as Twenty-One or Blackjack. This shouldn't be surprising because the dice game is derived from the card game. Both games take their name from the city of Macau, a former Portuguese colony in China that is now a glamorous resort whose economy is dominated by the gambling industry - a place where you can truly spend all night long shaking dice and risking your hard-earned cash.
Source: Author Fifiona81

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
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