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Quiz about 1337  Leet and Loving It
Quiz about 1337  Leet and Loving It

1337 - Leet and Loving It Trivia Quiz


Used in online communities since the rise of the Internet, 1337's alphabet is a hybrid of numbers, symbols, and letters. Here's a quiz on the basics of 1337's history and use in its many varieties, as well as some translations. 3//j0'/ (that is, enjoy)!

A multiple-choice quiz by darthrevan89. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
darthrevan89
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
317,347
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
5108
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: bradez (7/10), 21okie (3/10), sg81 (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. 1337 (leet) is an Internet dialect that was first used for the purpose of encryption. "Leet" is a shortened form of what word, and why was it so named? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. 1337 became popular with certain Internet users because its adaptable combination of letters, numbers, and symbols made it practically impossible to trace through traditional search methods, and allowed them to bypass censors. What is the leetspeak term for such an individual? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Though not "hardcore" 1337, the acronyms, emoticons, and abbreviated slang commonly used on the Internet are considered by some a part of the same dialect. What is this informal branch of Internet communication called? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. If you use leetspeak when chatting with experienced computer hackers, they will know that you are "the real deal" and that you must be an expert hacker.


Question 5 of 10
5. "1337" is not just a term for computer geeks. It is also the year that something began in Europe, lasting, not a century (as its name would imply), but 116 years. What word, written in leetspeak, describes the fighting that broke out in the year 1337? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. If you enter the web address 600673.com into your browser, you will pay a visit to the leetspeak version of what popular search engine? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Another non-leetspeak use for the number 1337 is as a temperature. The melting point of what precious, yellow, "first place" metal is 1337 degrees Kelvin (in leetspeak, please)? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Is it a common practice in leetspeak to vary the capitalization of the words you are typing, as DeMoNSTRaTeD in this SeNTeNCe?


Question 9 of 10
9. Some words that are often mistyped online have been adopted into 1337's vocabulary. What article, the most commonly used word in the English language, is an example of this? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Since leetspeak is not the easiest form of communication to read, you need to make sure that you use it in the proper arenas. Which of the following is the most likely place you'll see leetspeak, and the best time for you to use it without causing annoyance? Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. 1337 (leet) is an Internet dialect that was first used for the purpose of encryption. "Leet" is a shortened form of what word, and why was it so named?

Answer: "Elite," denoting the elite class its users placed themselves in

Because of the access 1337 (shortened from 31337) gave its users in early days of its use, they considered themselves as having an "elite" status. Encouraging creativity with its highly personalized alphabet and vocabulary, 1337 is now primarily associated with "Generation Y" or "millennials" - those born in the 1980s or '90s. It is a point of some debate whether 1337 is actually a language in and of itself, or simply a dialect.
2. 1337 became popular with certain Internet users because its adaptable combination of letters, numbers, and symbols made it practically impossible to trace through traditional search methods, and allowed them to bypass censors. What is the leetspeak term for such an individual?

Answer: Haxor

While forms of shorthand on the Internet have developed for legitimate reasons, hackers (haxors, or even H4X0RZ) used similar methods to get around the censors and moderators of Bulletin Board Systems to discuss illicit topics. Those in the "elite" class of 1337-speaking hackers were also able to gain access to hidden (or illegal) pages. Leetspeak is, thus, synonomous with hakspeak.
3. Though not "hardcore" 1337, the acronyms, emoticons, and abbreviated slang commonly used on the Internet are considered by some a part of the same dialect. What is this informal branch of Internet communication called?

Answer: Chatspeak

Although the two have blended together in recent incarnations, there are some key differences between chatspeak and hardcore 1337. Whereas chatspeak alters standard English words based on their sounds (e.g., "great" becomes "gr8"), 1337 usually rewrites words using characters that give a similar appearance to the original letters. Chatspeak users seek convenience and speed, but 1337 was originally about encryption and can be much more complex than the original word.
4. If you use leetspeak when chatting with experienced computer hackers, they will know that you are "the real deal" and that you must be an expert hacker.

Answer: False

This is not true at all! In fact, using the complex dialect is more likely to identify you as a "wanna-be." 1337 was not designed as a form of chat, and if you use it that way around real hackers, perhaps touting your "m4d sk1llz" (mad skills = talent), you may be labeled a script kiddie, an amateur hacker who uses existing scripts rather than creating their own unique ones.
5. "1337" is not just a term for computer geeks. It is also the year that something began in Europe, lasting, not a century (as its name would imply), but 116 years. What word, written in leetspeak, describes the fighting that broke out in the year 1337?

Answer: VV4R

The Hundred Years' War (1337-1453) took place in France, and was fought between the French and the English during the time period known as the Middle Ages. The word "war" could be written several different ways in 1337; in the correct answer, the W was formed with two capitalized Vs (VV). The three incorrect answers were famine ( Ph4m!//e ), crusade ( (RU54D& ), and plague ( PL49U3 ).
6. If you enter the web address 600673.com into your browser, you will pay a visit to the leetspeak version of what popular search engine?

Answer: Google

Founded in 1998 by Larry Page and Sergey Brin, the Google search engine aims to deliver fast and accurate results. In Google H4x0r, you can make a Google "s3a|2ch" (Search), or declare your hoped-for fortune by saying, "EyE Am ph33|1n6 |u(ky!" (I'm Feeling Lucky).

Indicating the enormity of information on the Internet for Google to access, the name "Google" comes from the word "googol," which is 10 to the hundredth power.
7. Another non-leetspeak use for the number 1337 is as a temperature. The melting point of what precious, yellow, "first place" metal is 1337 degrees Kelvin (in leetspeak, please)?

Answer: 6()1D

Gold (the correct answer, 6()1D) is measured in carats, with pure gold weighing in at 24 carats. In ancient times, gold and gems were measured using a carob seed, one carob equaling one carat. However, this method could have lent itself to dishonesty, if the measurer purposely chose heavier seeds.

The other three "metal" options given as incorrect answers were zinc (Z1//c), brass (Br4$$), and tin (71/V).
8. Is it a common practice in leetspeak to vary the capitalization of the words you are typing, as DeMoNSTRaTeD in this SeNTeNCe?

Answer: Yes

Though it is purely cosmetic and not helpful if your purpose is encryption, it is acceptable to vary your capitalization when speaking in 1337. One method of doing so may involve capitalizing only the consonants and leaving the vowels in lower-case. This gives your words a height variation similar to alternating lower-case letters and numbers.
9. Some words that are often mistyped online have been adopted into 1337's vocabulary. What article, the most commonly used word in the English language, is an example of this?

Answer: Teh (the)

In the English language, the definite article "the" and the indefinite articles "a" and "an" serve to identity nouns as referring to something either specific or unspecific. For example, "I will buy THE car" differs from "I will buy A car." Thanks to the articles, the reader will know if I have a specific car in mind, or not. Due to a misspelling often made when one types quickly, 1337 transposes the last two letters and "the" becomes "teh" or "t3h." Similarly, "own," as in having beaten or bested someone, becomes "pwn."
10. Since leetspeak is not the easiest form of communication to read, you need to make sure that you use it in the proper arenas. Which of the following is the most likely place you'll see leetspeak, and the best time for you to use it without causing annoyance?

Answer: While playing an MMORPG

Most online forums frown upon the use of 1337 or other chatspeak, and using it while engaging in online business dealings or doing schoolwork would not be recommended either. The best outlet for your inner 1337-speaking geek is an MMORPG (massively multiplayer online role-playing game), such as "World of Warcraft," where you can hold real-time conversations with other 1337-speaking players during the game.

Another instance when 1337 comes in handy is the creation of secure Internet passwords. 1337-based passwords can be far more secure than using a basic English word, yet still easy to remember if you choose something familiar. For instance, it would not be very secure to make your password the word "password." However, "p4$$VV02d" would be far more difficult to crack.
Source: Author darthrevan89

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor LadyCaitriona before going online.
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