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Quiz about Raised in the 1660s
Quiz about Raised in the 1660s

Raised in the 1660s Trivia Quiz


Meet Faith, a young girl growing up in London in the 1660s. Peek into her journal, and try to deduce what she's writing about.

A multiple-choice quiz by leith90. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
leith90
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
317,373
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
11297
Awards
Editor's Choice
Last 3 plays: masfon (9/10), Guest 90 (7/10), Mookie325 (8/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. November 28, 1660.
"Father did attend a lecture by Mr Wren this day, and bade us heed; he and his acquaintances: in truth, Sir Moray, Mr Wren and Viscount Brouncker, hath begun a new academy for "Promotion and Improvement of Natural Knowledge". Indeed, I do not understand, but Father is quite inspired."

What scientific academy was formed in 1660 with Robert Hooke as its first Curator of Experiments?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. April 23, 1661.
"'Twas St Georges day and much ado, for the King was crowned this day. Such richness of cloth, the likes of which I have not seen. The King looked very fine, in robes, with crowne and sceptre, under a canopy carried by Barons. The champion on horseback, the Nobility in their Parliament robes and the feast with food and ale enough for all of London to partake. Indeed, most all of London did!"

Who was this English monarch?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. May 21, 1662.
"The King doth take a wife today and wedded the Portuguese Princess. Our Queene, nay, Consort, (for she is not a Protestant), looked well in her finery, but rather old, if 'tis not treasonable. Indeed, Her Grace is three and twenty!"

Which Princess married the English monarch?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. May 7, 1663.
"Oh dreary day. Miss Crawford did desire a Latin discourse, and thus did we bide our time.
Mother and Father went thither by coach to Drury Lane, to attend the new playhouse just begun this day. Such a diversion 'twould be to witness the spectacle, with scenes of Mr Fletcher's "The Humourous Lieutenant"."

Which London theatre opened its doors for the first time in 1663?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. August 30, 1664.
"Father attended a science gathering this day, and was much pleased on return, for Mr Willis writ of his exploration of the brain, with diagrams by Mr Wren. Mr Newton too did come to dine with us upon Venison pasty. His discourse on falling apples was diverting, though methinks, I confess, he did not seem so pleased. A minor problem, says he, on how such formulae to be writ, so he may publish his discovery."

What did Mr (Issac) Newton hypothesise in 1664?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. June 28, 1665.
"The sickenesse hath increased mightily, I this day see many houses, marked with red cross upon the door, and "Lord have mercy upon us" writ there. Thence we to the country, lest we should succumb."

What illness invaded London in 1665?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. September 3 1666.
"Am very ill at ease this eventide. The conflagration neared, thus we removed to Oxfordshire. Our odious neighbour, Mr Pepys, hath dug a great hole in the garden and laid in there papers and wine and cheese.
How horridly the sky looked, as I would imagine the gates of hell. Should I be less melancholy, what wit 'twould be, that place in Pudding Lane."

Which place in Pudding Lane was, rather ironically, the seat of Great Fire of London?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. June 1, 1667.
"Last eventide I presented to society at Lady Jemima Montagu's ball.
This day, Miss Crawford hath given me a gift: a poem. But lo! An exceedingly long poem by Mr Milton. "'Tis of great doctrinal import" says she. "'Tis ten books", says I. But nay, 'tis only one. Methinks mayhap be overlong afore I finish!"

What great poem did John Milton publish in 1667?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. August 26, 1668.
"Such a to-do this day! Such bangings and yelling from the town 'til Mother was all aflutter. Methinks 'twas a fyre, but none to be seen. Thither went Father to see, and 'twas a construction blewn up! 'Tis good, for the building was in ever great danger of collapse, and now shall be replaced."

Which building, damaged by the Great Fire in 1666, was finally demolished in 1668?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. September 20, 1669.
"The banns have been read, I shall be wed afore Michaelmas. Mother and Father are much pleased, as is our King, for my betrothed became the astronomy Professor at Oxford many years past. 'Tis also an architect of great esteem, hath assumed the grand title of Royal Architect this past sennight."

Who is young Faith marrying?
Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. November 28, 1660. "Father did attend a lecture by Mr Wren this day, and bade us heed; he and his acquaintances: in truth, Sir Moray, Mr Wren and Viscount Brouncker, hath begun a new academy for "Promotion and Improvement of Natural Knowledge". Indeed, I do not understand, but Father is quite inspired." What scientific academy was formed in 1660 with Robert Hooke as its first Curator of Experiments?

Answer: Royal Society

Scientists and philosophers formed The Royal Society after decades of informal meetings. The Society first began at Gresham College, but was forced to move to Arundel House following the Great Fire in 1666. Today the society is located in Carlton House Terrace in London.
King Charles approved and encouraged the venture, and the society was first called "The Royal Society" in 1661. The following year they were granted charter to publish, and the first books were John Evelyn's "Sylva" and Robert Hooke's "Micrographia".
The Society today awards for excellence in science.
2. April 23, 1661. "'Twas St Georges day and much ado, for the King was crowned this day. Such richness of cloth, the likes of which I have not seen. The King looked very fine, in robes, with crowne and sceptre, under a canopy carried by Barons. The champion on horseback, the Nobility in their Parliament robes and the feast with food and ale enough for all of London to partake. Indeed, most all of London did!" Who was this English monarch?

Answer: Charles II

Following the execution of Charles I for treason, the English parliament did not proclaim Charles II as their King. Instead, Oliver Cromwell ran the country and the commonwealth during the time known as the "English Interregnum". After Cromwell's death in 1658, Charles was invited to return from his exile in Europe and assume the throne.

This then began the period known as "The Restoration" following twenty years of Civil War and anarchy. The population celebrated Charles's coronation eagerly, jubilant that the Monarchy had been re-established, and cheered during his procession from the Tower of London to Whitehall the day before. Charles was the last monarch to make this traditional procession.
3. May 21, 1662. "The King doth take a wife today and wedded the Portuguese Princess. Our Queene, nay, Consort, (for she is not a Protestant), looked well in her finery, but rather old, if 'tis not treasonable. Indeed, Her Grace is three and twenty!" Which Princess married the English monarch?

Answer: Catherine of Braganza

Charles II and Catherine of Braganza were married by proxy in April in Lisbon. She then travelled to London where she and Charles had a private Roman Catholic ceremony followed by the public Anglican service. Catherine's dowry included the countries of Tanzania and Bombay (now Mumbai), and their union allowed the formation the Indian Empire of England and the establishment of Portugal's independence.
4. May 7, 1663. "Oh dreary day. Miss Crawford did desire a Latin discourse, and thus did we bide our time. Mother and Father went thither by coach to Drury Lane, to attend the new playhouse just begun this day. Such a diversion 'twould be to witness the spectacle, with scenes of Mr Fletcher's "The Humourous Lieutenant"." Which London theatre opened its doors for the first time in 1663?

Answer: Theatre Royal

The "Theatre Royal", was also known by the rather unfortunate name of "The King's Playhouse". Whilst the theatre was in Drury Lane, its entrance was in Bridges Street, and often the theatre was termed "The Royal in Bridges Street". The playhouse was also one of the few establishments at the time to be given rights to present spoken plays rather than limiting it to opera and dance. As it was neither safe nor feasible to light the stage by candlelight, performances were held in the afternoon to take advantage of sunlight.

The pit, (the main audience floor), was roofless to facilitate the admittance of light, but unfortunately it also allowed the intrusion of rain in inclement weather.
5. August 30, 1664. "Father attended a science gathering this day, and was much pleased on return, for Mr Willis writ of his exploration of the brain, with diagrams by Mr Wren. Mr Newton too did come to dine with us upon Venison pasty. His discourse on falling apples was diverting, though methinks, I confess, he did not seem so pleased. A minor problem, says he, on how such formulae to be writ, so he may publish his discovery." What did Mr (Issac) Newton hypothesise in 1664?

Answer: Gravity

Isaac Newton saw an apple fall from a tree (it didn't really hit him on the head) and wondered what caused its velocity to increase as it fell. He then made a scientific leap and thought that might not gravity extend to the moon? He then pondered whether the gravitational force exerted caused the moon to orbit the Earth. Although he first thought of the idea of gravity in 1664, it took another two decades before he produced the formula to explain it.

In 1687 he published "Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica". (Latin for "Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy"), which states his theory.
6. June 28, 1665. "The sickenesse hath increased mightily, I this day see many houses, marked with red cross upon the door, and "Lord have mercy upon us" writ there. Thence we to the country, lest we should succumb." What illness invaded London in 1665?

Answer: The Bubonic Plague

The Bubonic Plague (Black Plague or Black Death) is thought to have spread from Europe to England by fleas on rodents. The outbreak reached its peak during the summer of 1666 in the midst of a heat wave. Many affluent Londoners fled to their country estates to escape the danger, however many city authorities elected to stay behind. The poor had no choice and their numbers were decimated. Official records estimated 100,000 people perished, however the number of casualties overwhelmed officials and records were poorly maintained. It is highly probable this figure is grossly underestimated.
In an effort to protect them from the disease, the men chewed tobacco, and burned pepper, hops or frankincense. Fires in public places were kept burning in futile attempts to cleanse the air. The women carried a posy of flowers (particularly lavender and herbs) under their noses, although this may have been in an effort to rid the stench from the massive burial pits.
The plague ended after the great fire and it is thought this is because the vermin were killed.
7. September 3 1666. "Am very ill at ease this eventide. The conflagration neared, thus we removed to Oxfordshire. Our odious neighbour, Mr Pepys, hath dug a great hole in the garden and laid in there papers and wine and cheese. How horridly the sky looked, as I would imagine the gates of hell. Should I be less melancholy, what wit 'twould be, that place in Pudding Lane." Which place in Pudding Lane was, rather ironically, the seat of Great Fire of London?

Answer: Bakery

The great fire began in Thomas Farriner's (or Farynor's) bakery after he closed shop. Due to the overcrowding and almost non-existent fire fighting facilities at the time, the fire spread rapidly and continued unabated for three days. Many of the affluent of London removed themselves and their valuables out of the area, afraid they would lose all and be flung in the poorhouse.
Almost 90% of houses were destroyed. However, the affluent areas of Westminster and the Palace of Whitehall were spared. St Paul's Cathedral which was being restored was also severely damaged. In the end, houses were blown up with gunpowder to create a sizeable firebreak, and a fortunate change in the wind blew the fire back onto itself.
Mr Samuel Pepys sent his money to an acquaintance's house, where he also left his wife and maid to guard it. According to his diaries, he did indeed bury office papers, his wine and his Parmesan cheese in a hole in the garden!

http://www.pepys.info/index.html
8. June 1, 1667. "Last eventide I presented to society at Lady Jemima Montagu's ball. This day, Miss Crawford hath given me a gift: a poem. But lo! An exceedingly long poem by Mr Milton. "'Tis of great doctrinal import" says she. "'Tis ten books", says I. But nay, 'tis only one. Methinks mayhap be overlong afore I finish!" What great poem did John Milton publish in 1667?

Answer: Paradise Lost

"Paradise Lost" is an epic, blank-versed poem about the fall of man by John Milton. The first book is similar to the "Book of Genesis" in the Bible, but goes on to include Paganism, classical Greek and Christianity. Originally it was published in ten books, but after 1674 it was redivided into twelve books.
9. August 26, 1668. "Such a to-do this day! Such bangings and yelling from the town 'til Mother was all aflutter. Methinks 'twas a fyre, but none to be seen. Thither went Father to see, and 'twas a construction blewn up! 'Tis good, for the building was in ever great danger of collapse, and now shall be replaced." Which building, damaged by the Great Fire in 1666, was finally demolished in 1668?

Answer: St Paul's Cathedral

St Paul's Cathedral was severely damaged in the Great Fire, and although repairs were made, the building was structurally unsound.
Plans for its replacement had been submitted and rejected many times, but eventually a plan was approved. The cathedral was finally rebuilt and opened in 1710.
For the demolition of the building, gunpowder was tried, but the populace complained about the noise, so a battering ram was used instead.
10. September 20, 1669. "The banns have been read, I shall be wed afore Michaelmas. Mother and Father are much pleased, as is our King, for my betrothed became the astronomy Professor at Oxford many years past. 'Tis also an architect of great esteem, hath assumed the grand title of Royal Architect this past sennight." Who is young Faith marrying?

Answer: Christopher Wren

Christopher Wren was conferred a knighthood in 1673, and was one of the highest acclaimed English architects in history. He was responsible for the reconstruction of not only St Paul's cathedral, but another 54 churches in the years following the fire of 1666.
Sir Christopher was also an astronomer, geometer and mathematician-physicist. Not only was he one of the founders of the Royal Society (in question 1), but Sir Isaac Newton also lauded his scientific work.
A fair amount of creative licence was taken in the creation of Faith in this quiz. Sir Christopher did marry Faith Coghill in 1669, but she was the 33 year-old daughter of his childhood neighbours, not the young girl I made her out to be.
Source: Author leith90

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Exit10 before going online.
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