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Quiz about Egyptian Mythology  The Afterlife
Quiz about Egyptian Mythology  The Afterlife

Egyptian Mythology - The Afterlife Quiz


The idea of death was far from the end of things in Egyptian mythology. This quiz looks at the rituals and beliefs of the ancient Egyptians when it came to this (usually) taboo subject.

A multiple-choice quiz by doublemm. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
doublemm
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
348,488
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
783
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 73 (5/10), Guest 118 (9/10), Guest 38 (9/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Careful rituals were followed during the process of mummification in ancient Egypt. One such ritual, which involved the use of several magical tools, intended to prepare the deceased for their new life by allowing them to speak and eat. What was this ritual known as? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. As the deceased travelled west, they eventually came to a labyrinth with many portals. Which ancient text was said to contain spells which would help the deceased defeat such obstacles? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. In order to preserve the features of the deceased, which process, said to have been invented by the jackal-headed Anubis, was often carried out during the process of mummification? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. The dead were taken through the place of the dead, known as Duat, on a grand boat known as Mesektet which was decorated with gold, gems and fine wood. To which deity did this boat belong? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. It was said that the dead would depart from the boat in the third region of Duat, known as Amenti, where they would be judged by the council of gods. The gods who sailed the boat, however, would continue their journey through the other regions of Duat. How many regions of Duat were there? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. When the dead departed from the boat in Amenti, the third region of Duat, they entered the hall of Osiris where they were judged on their wrong-doings. Which of the following was NOT a specific crime which was looked at during this process? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. After facing trial by Osiris and his forty-two assessor-gods, the dead would then have their heart placed on the Scales of Truth, with light hearts being rewarded with eternal life and heavy hearts being devoured. What was the heart weighted against? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. In order for the Weighing of the Heart ceremony to take place, the dead in ancient Egypt must not have their heart removed. This is in contrast to the stomach, liver, lungs and intestines, which were removed and placed in canpopic jars. After whom were these four canopic jars named? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. According to Egyptian mythology, what name was given to the plentiful land in which those who were true in heart dwelt after their judgement? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The Egyptians believed that one's soul (or personality) existed as an entity called the ba, which would join the ka, or life force, in the afterlife. Which of the following is commonly used to represent the ba? Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Careful rituals were followed during the process of mummification in ancient Egypt. One such ritual, which involved the use of several magical tools, intended to prepare the deceased for their new life by allowing them to speak and eat. What was this ritual known as?

Answer: The Opening of the Mouth

This process of animating the mouth, eyes, ears and nose was said to give mummies potential for life. The tradition was said to have been started by the god Ptah, the chief god in the city of Memphis.
2. As the deceased travelled west, they eventually came to a labyrinth with many portals. Which ancient text was said to contain spells which would help the deceased defeat such obstacles?

Answer: The Book of the Dead

The 'Book of the Dead' was an expensive text to purchase and those who were rich enough to be buried with the book were more likely to achieve entry into the afterlife. As well as navigating their way through the labyrinth in the west, the deceased also had to recite a set text at each doorway, of which there were twenty-one (according the 'Book of the Dead').
3. In order to preserve the features of the deceased, which process, said to have been invented by the jackal-headed Anubis, was often carried out during the process of mummification?

Answer: Embalming

Anubis, son of Osiris and Nephthys, was the most important Egyptian deity involved in the journey to the afterlife. He invented the process of embalming, which he first used to preserve his father, Osiris. As well as receiving the mummy, performing the Opening of the Mouth ceremony and monitoring the Scales of Truth, Anubis was also originally the god of the dead, although this role was assumed by Osiris after he came to dwell in Duat, the place of the dead.
4. The dead were taken through the place of the dead, known as Duat, on a grand boat known as Mesektet which was decorated with gold, gems and fine wood. To which deity did this boat belong?

Answer: Re

This boat was the night boat of Re, in which he transported the dead into Duat. The boat also transported Re and other gods through Duat where they fought the evil Apep. The day boat of Re was called Mandjet.
5. It was said that the dead would depart from the boat in the third region of Duat, known as Amenti, where they would be judged by the council of gods. The gods who sailed the boat, however, would continue their journey through the other regions of Duat. How many regions of Duat were there?

Answer: Twelve

According to the "Amduat", an Egyptian funerary text that was written during the New Kingdom, Duat consisted of twelve regions. Each night, Ra, the sun god, would travel through each of the twelve regions fighting against the god Apep, who was believed to have brought chaos to the world. Ra's goal was to regain the world's order by morning.
6. When the dead departed from the boat in Amenti, the third region of Duat, they entered the hall of Osiris where they were judged on their wrong-doings. Which of the following was NOT a specific crime which was looked at during this process?

Answer: Giving money to charity

According to the 'Book of the Dead', Osiris was joined by forty-two gods, each of whom was responsible for looking at a specific crime which may or may not have been committed by the person under assessment. In addition to the incorrect options in the question above, these crimes included having a bad temper, being over-active and being too loud.
7. After facing trial by Osiris and his forty-two assessor-gods, the dead would then have their heart placed on the Scales of Truth, with light hearts being rewarded with eternal life and heavy hearts being devoured. What was the heart weighted against?

Answer: The feather of Ma'at

In some versions of this tradition, those with heavy hearts were made to exist in the afterlife performing strange acts, such as walking upside down or suffering constant hunger and thirst. In other versions, however, the beastly goddess known as Ammit would be poised by the scales, ready to devour any heart which was heavier than the feather of Ma'at.
8. In order for the Weighing of the Heart ceremony to take place, the dead in ancient Egypt must not have their heart removed. This is in contrast to the stomach, liver, lungs and intestines, which were removed and placed in canpopic jars. After whom were these four canopic jars named?

Answer: The four sons of Horus

The four sons of the sky god Horus were named Duamutef (stomach, jackal-headed), Hapi (lungs, baboon-headed), Imseti (liver, human-headed) and Qebesenuef (intestines, falcon-headed). The heart was seen as the seat of intelligence and the soul and was therefore of the utmost importance when it came to one being judged on their wrong-doings. The brain was removed as waste.
9. According to Egyptian mythology, what name was given to the plentiful land in which those who were true in heart dwelt after their judgement?

Answer: The Field of Reeds

Whilst kings lived an afterlife of luxury and were in the company of the gods, non-royal beings, although still having a comfortable existence, had to work in the Field of Reeds, and would assist the voyage of Re each night.
10. The Egyptians believed that one's soul (or personality) existed as an entity called the ba, which would join the ka, or life force, in the afterlife. Which of the following is commonly used to represent the ba?

Answer: A bird with a human head

The concept of the soul in ancient Egypt was a complicated one. There were several aspects of a soul, such as the ba, the ka, the ib (the heart), the rn (the name), and the sheut (shadow). The ka was said to be a weaker aspect of the soul and required a large offering of food and beer to maintain it once a person had passed away.
Source: Author doublemm

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor looney_tunes before going online.
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