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Quiz about Provocative Art Terms
Quiz about Provocative Art Terms

'P'rovocative Art Terms Trivia Quiz


Yet another in my series of art terms quizzes, this one might prove interesting for art lovers everywhere. Please feel free to peruse this provocative quiz which will leave you peaceful and pensive!

A multiple-choice quiz by thejazzkickazz. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
109,414
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
610
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
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Question 1 of 10
1. This 'P' term of architecture and sculpture comes from the ancient Greek for a 'brick' or 'squared stone', and refers to the square block that supports a column or a statue. What is this very useful and often bulky item called?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Which of these 'P' art movements was created by Charles Edouard Jeanneret (aka Le Corbusier) and Amédée Ozenfant in 1918 to counter what they saw as the contamination of Cubism. What did they call their movement?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. This 'ism' is occasionally called 'Neo-Impressionism', and was avidly referred to as 'Divisionism' by Georges Seurat. How do art connoisseurs most often refer to this 'P' -ism in the modern day?

Answer: (P_____ism)
Question 4 of 10
4. Which of the following items is associated with the creation of 'plaster of Paris', often used in sculpture?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Coming from the Latin for 'to paint', this 'P' art term not only refers to powders that impart color to paints, but also to the substances within animals and plants that provide coloring to the cells, 'melanin' being one example. What is this very useful 'P' term?

Answer: (P______)
Question 6 of 10
6. In ancient times he was called Eros by the Greeks and Cupid by the Romans. When the Renaissance artists began to paint him, a naked and chubby child-like figure, occasionally with wings, by what 'P' word was he termed?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Of the 'illuminated books' of the pre-Gutenberg printing days, this 'book of Psalms' was the most important vis-à-vis illustrators...what was it called?

Answer: (Ps_____)
Question 8 of 10
8. This ancient writing material, made from sheep or calf skins, was invented in anceint Pergamum sometime during the 2nd century BC. What was it called?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. What is the term for a work of art that is an imitation, not a copy, of another artist (or several other artists) style?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. An association of artists founded in 1901 in Munich, it featured Wassily Kandinsky as its first President in 1902. By what name, hearkening back to ancient times, did this anti-conservative organization go?
Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This 'P' term of architecture and sculpture comes from the ancient Greek for a 'brick' or 'squared stone', and refers to the square block that supports a column or a statue. What is this very useful and often bulky item called?

Answer: Plinth

An interesting side note to this word, which has one of the most ancient etymologies of any art term. The original Greek term 'plinthos' is derived from the ancient Minoan language, as are any other words that end with the suffix -inthos. Words that we still use with the same suffix include: hyacinth, Corinth(ian) and labyrinth. As you probably know, the labyrinth was located under the palace of King Minos of Crete, where Minoan civilization was centered.
2. Which of these 'P' art movements was created by Charles Edouard Jeanneret (aka Le Corbusier) and Amédée Ozenfant in 1918 to counter what they saw as the contamination of Cubism. What did they call their movement?

Answer: Purism

Jeanneret and Ozenfant founded a periodical which they called 'L'Esprit Nouveau' in 1918, and proceeded to produce a number of paintings that they felt captured the essence of what Cubism had lost from its beginnings. Jeanneret went on to much greater fame as the architect Le Corbusier, but is now getting more attention for his Purist painting as well. After having seen an exhibit of the Purist works I felt that they were rather redundant of the works of Analytical Cubism, but that's just one individual's opinion!
3. This 'ism' is occasionally called 'Neo-Impressionism', and was avidly referred to as 'Divisionism' by Georges Seurat. How do art connoisseurs most often refer to this 'P' -ism in the modern day?

Answer: Pointillism

Pointillism is a term applied to works of art that contain thousands of separate dabs of paint, usually of pure color, which when viewed from a distance seem to blend in such a way that a lovely picture appears. Seurat and Paul Signac were the most famous practitioners of scientific Pointillism (which they termed 'Divisionism'), though technically the Impressionists used the technique prior to these two.

The term 'Pointillism' was coined by Félix Fénéon, an art critic.
4. Which of the following items is associated with the creation of 'plaster of Paris', often used in sculpture?

Answer: Gypsum

Gypsum is a hydrous calcium sulfate that forms the base for plaster of Paris. When water is added to plaster of Paris it quickly hardens into the shape of one's choosing, either a pre-fabricated mold or a shapeless form that can then be carved. It is also sometimes called alabaster.
5. Coming from the Latin for 'to paint', this 'P' art term not only refers to powders that impart color to paints, but also to the substances within animals and plants that provide coloring to the cells, 'melanin' being one example. What is this very useful 'P' term?

Answer: Pigment

There are a wide variety of pigments used in art, for example the stone lapis lazuli has been used historically to create the paint color aquamarine. Chlorophyll is the pigment in plants that causes them to become green. The word 'pigment' comes from the Latin term 'pigmentum', from 'pingere' which means 'to paint'.
6. In ancient times he was called Eros by the Greeks and Cupid by the Romans. When the Renaissance artists began to paint him, a naked and chubby child-like figure, occasionally with wings, by what 'P' word was he termed?

Answer: Putto

Universal in the art of the Renaissance and beyond, putti (plural form) were a virtual requirement of religious and mythological painting. Most commonly, putti were used merely for their decorative value and to add balance to a painting. One thing is for sure, no putto ever lacked for proper nutrition!
7. Of the 'illuminated books' of the pre-Gutenberg printing days, this 'book of Psalms' was the most important vis-à-vis illustrators...what was it called?

Answer: Psalter

The Psalter, or Book of Psalms, was probably the most popular book for illustrators to show off their wears during the late Gothic - early Renaissance period. The Psalterium was also the second major printing project of the newly created Gutenberg press after the Bible.
8. This ancient writing material, made from sheep or calf skins, was invented in anceint Pergamum sometime during the 2nd century BC. What was it called?

Answer: Parchment

The name 'parchment' is derived from the Latin 'pergamena', meaning 'of Pergamum'. Sometimes other animal skins were used, such as goat and pig. Around the 14th century paper supplanted parchment as the primary writing material in Europe, though parchment continued to be used for certain, special documents afterwards.
9. What is the term for a work of art that is an imitation, not a copy, of another artist (or several other artists) style?

Answer: Pastiche

A pastiche (or pasticcio) painting is not to be confused with a direct copy, though sometimes the term is used to describe a 'fake'. Interesting note...the word pastiche was introduced into English from the French, and ultimately derives from the italian 'pasticcio', meaning 'pastry cake'. I wonder if Wayne Thiebaud's works could also be termed pastiches? (Sorry...terrible joke, couldn't resist!)
10. An association of artists founded in 1901 in Munich, it featured Wassily Kandinsky as its first President in 1902. By what name, hearkening back to ancient times, did this anti-conservative organization go?

Answer: Phalanx

The term Phalanx comes from the ancient Greek, and refers to a military formation. The spirit of the Phalanx association was of an aggressive and modernistic society of artists who would resist the conservative views of the artists of the Academy, and of the Sezession, around the turn of the century. Though the society only existed for 4 years, its ideas influenced a number of the German Expressionist painters who would become active in the first half of the 20th century. Thank you for having tried this quiz, I hope you enjoyed it and learned a few things.
Source: Author thejazzkickazz

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