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Quiz about Women in Greek Mythology I the Strong
Quiz about Women in Greek Mythology I the Strong

Women in Greek Mythology I: the Strong Quiz


Greek mythology is full of strong women. The subjects of this quiz overcame massive cultural, familial and (or) personal obstacles to seize control of their own fates. In some cases happily, in others not.

A multiple-choice quiz by xaosdog. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
xaosdog
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
63,166
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
7973
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 216 (5/10), IMGOOFY (2/10), Brnate (9/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This is arguably the most famous woman in all of Greek mythology, and quite possibly the strongest of character. Her skill, knowledge and self-sacrifice made nearly all of Jason's successes possible in the course of his quest for the golden fleece; subsequently she was betrayed by him, for which she wrought a terrible revenge. Who was she?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 2 of 10
2. Although this woman ruled a small kingdom alone, facing great adversity, for decades, the reason she is one of the greatest women in Greek mythology is chiefly the intelligence and resourcefulness with which she held at bay a force of pretenders to her missing husband's throne and bedchamber. A stratagem less subtle than the one she employed would surely have resulted in loss of her kingdom by force. Who was this queen of Ithaca? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Theseus won renown for slaying the Minotaur, but he only provided the brawn. Who provided the wit and cunning -- and according to some versions of the myth, the concealed weapon -- that were the monster's undoing? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. This princess of Ilium spent her lifetime telling people precisely what would befall them, always being right, and never being believed. Who was she? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. This woman was raised by bears, and grew up to become a huntress. She was the first to wound the terrible Calydonian boar which had been sent to ravage the kingdom of Oeneus by Artemis (and which had resisted the efforts of many strong male heroes to harm it). But her main claim to fame was her fleetness of foot: she swore that she would never wed a man unless he outraced her, and the punishment for racing and losing was death at the point of her javelin. Many tried and failed to beat her; ultimately she allowed herself to be beaten by a suitor with the backing of the goddess of love. Who was she? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The Amazons were a tribe (or tribes) of warrior women, who produced a large number of proud heroines. Which of the following is NOT an amazon warrior renowned for her courage in Greek mythology? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This princess of Thebes loved her brother so well that she proudly and willingly risked her life to preserve his honor. Specifically, it was ordered that his body be allowed to lie and rot rather than receive funeral honors (which probably would have meant a more horrible afterlife for her brother's shade, as well as the insult to his earthly status). She disobeyed the decree and buried her brother's corpse, for which she died. Who was she? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. This proud Queen of Lydia actually owned Heracles as a slave for a period of time. During this period she dominated him utterly, forcing him to wear women's clothing and to perform traditionally distaff tasks, while she wore his lion's-skin cloak and brandished his club. She is said to have punished him for clumsiness by beating him with her slipper. Who was she? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. This woman, born a princess of Phoenicia, fled her home city of Tyre after her brother's treachery to found a new kingdom, drawing only upon her wits, a little gold, and a handful of men. Through cunning, she was able to purchase the site of a great city -- Carthage -- for the price of the area of ground that could be covered with a bull's hide. She made the bargain and then cut the hide of the bull into a very long, impossibly thin strip, which she used to encircle a vast area. Who was this clever and resourceful queen of Carthage? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. This woman, subject of a play by Euripides, was the wife of Admetus. When she learned that her husband had not long to live, her love for him was so strong that she was willing to make a bargain with the Fates to trade her life for his, dying in his place. Admetus, recovered from his illness after her self-sacrifice, was unable to bear the misfortune of surviving his loving wife; his grief and his wife's beautiful gesture inspired Heracles to enter Hades, wrestle Thanatos, and return to the land of the living with Admetus' wife restored to full vigor. Who was this paragon of courage and love? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This is arguably the most famous woman in all of Greek mythology, and quite possibly the strongest of character. Her skill, knowledge and self-sacrifice made nearly all of Jason's successes possible in the course of his quest for the golden {fleece;} subsequently she was betrayed by him, for which she wrought a terrible revenge. Who was she?

Answer: Medea

Medea was a grand-daughter of the sun-god Helios, and niece to the sorceress Circe. Hera did her a great disservice by making her love Jason, who did not merit her devotion on any level. She gave up everything she had and betrayed her own father to save Jason's life and to make his quest successful, then used her wits to save his life again from his wicked uncle Pelias.

Her reward was to be cast aside when a more politically advantageous union presented itself to Jason. She responded by murdering the new bride, as well as her own children by Jason. Medea is the subject of a play by Euripides.
2. Although this woman ruled a small kingdom alone, facing great adversity, for decades, the reason she is one of the greatest women in Greek mythology is chiefly the intelligence and resourcefulness with which she held at bay a force of pretenders to her missing husband's throne and bedchamber. A stratagem less subtle than the one she employed would surely have resulted in loss of her kingdom by force. Who was this queen of Ithaca?

Answer: Penelope

While Odysseus was absent for twenty long years, first at the war at Ilium, then all over the Mediterranean at the mercy of Poseidon, Penelope kept a horde of suitors at bay. Had she refused their advances outright, they would easily have overwhelmed the island with their collective force.

Her ultimate stratagem was to tell them she would select a new husband from among their number once she finished weaving a tapestry in honor of the departed Odysseus. By day she spun under their watchful {eyes;} by night she unraveled her work and undid her progress, buying precious time.

This bought her three years, by the end of which time Odysseus returned.
3. Theseus won renown for slaying the Minotaur, but he only provided the brawn. Who provided the wit and cunning -- and according to some versions of the myth, the concealed weapon -- that were the monster's undoing?

Answer: Ariadne

The story of the Minotaur begins with the impiety of Cretan King Minos, who swore to sacrifice a certain miraculous bull to Poseidon. When Minos substituted another bull to send to the knife, the gods were offended. They therefore caused Minos' wife to conceive an unholy passion for the bull.

The Queen ordered Daedelus, the engineer of unparalleled skill, to construct a device to make it possible for her to consummate her desire, so he made a hollow cow with which the bull could couple with the queen inside.

She subsequently bore Asterius, the Minotaur, a creature with the body of a man but the head of a bull -- and an appetite for human flesh. An oracle told Minos to 'conceal his shame with cunning' so he ordered Daedelus to build a bewildering maze within which to house the creature. (Because Daedelus and his son knew the way through the maze, Minos then betrayed them by imprisoning them in a tall tower. Daedelus fashioned wings with which the two escaped, but his son Icarus famously flew too high... Daedelus went on to invent hot and cold running water, and to 'thread the conch' among other escapades) ...To make a long story short, Theseus, along with thirteen other youths, was sent by Aegeus of Athens as tribute to Knossos, where Minos would feed them to the Minotaur. Ariadne decided to help handsome Theseus, and therefore gave him a ball of thread (and in some versions of the myth, a knife) with which to mark his trail through the so-called Labyrinth (from a word for axe, presumably because the Minotaur bore an axe, or because the maze contained a sacred axe, or because the palace at Knossos contained a famous axe or axes) so that he might find his way out of it. ...Theseus was successful, and fled Knossos with Ariadne, but faithlessly abandoned her on Naxos.

However, Ariadne was comforted there by the god Dionysos, which you have to figure was trading up. ...One last factoid: Theseus screwed up again, by forgetting to hoist the red (or white) sail that would signify to his adoptive father Aegeus that his mission had been successful. Seeing Theseus' ship on the horizon with its original black sail, Augeus leapt into the sea and ended his own life. Hence the name of the Aegean Sea.
4. This princess of Ilium spent her lifetime telling people precisely what would befall them, always being right, and never being believed. Who was she?

Answer: Cassandra

Cassandra caught Apollo's eye, and the god would do anything to have her. Rather originally, not to mention cleverly, she demanded the gift of prophecy in exchange for bestowing her charms upon the lusty god. However, she got a little greedy and refused to succumb to his advances despite the fact that the god kept his side of the bargain. Apollo thereupon spat into her mouth, cursing her so that although she would keep the gift of prophecy, her predictions would never be believed.

She predicted that Paris' kidnapping of Helen would lead to the destruction of Ilium, that the wooden horse would contain armed men, and that she and Agamemnon would both die if he took her with him to Mycenae.

She was right every time.
5. This woman was raised by bears, and grew up to become a huntress. She was the first to wound the terrible Calydonian boar which had been sent to ravage the kingdom of Oeneus by Artemis (and which had resisted the efforts of many strong male heroes to harm it). But her main claim to fame was her fleetness of foot: she swore that she would never wed a man unless he outraced her, and the punishment for racing and losing was death at the point of her javelin. Many tried and failed to beat {her;} ultimately she allowed herself to be beaten by a suitor with the backing of the goddess of love. Who was she?

Answer: Atalanta

In the great Calydonian boar hunt, Meleager delivered the beast's death blow, but acknowledged Atalanta's crucial role by giving her its head, hide and {tusks;} to do so caused his death, since his uncles protested and a fight ensued in which he slew them, for which his mother burned the log with which Meleager's fate was linked, so that he perished.

She is also said to have slain two centaurs who tried to take her virginity. Later, when Milanion, also known as Hippomenes, fell in love with her, and she with him, Aphrodite aided the lovers in overcoming Atalanta's vow to maintain her chastity until defeated by giving the lad three golden apples to roll into Atalanta's path as they raced, delaying her while she picked them up.

However, Ovid tells us that the boy failed to show his gratitude to the goddess through sacrifice, and that she arranged the lovers' downfall.

She caused them to become overcome with lust while in a sacred place, so that they desecrated it with their coupling. In punishment, they were transformed into bears, providing Atalanta's tale with a certain satisfying closure.
6. The Amazons were a tribe (or tribes) of warrior women, who produced a large number of proud heroines. Which of the following is NOT an amazon warrior renowned for her courage in Greek mythology?

Answer: Electra

Electra was the sister of Orestes, who helped avenge the death of Agamemnon, their father, by killing Clytemnestra, their mother. She lends her name to the Electra complex, if less aptly than does Oedipus to his better-known eponymous pathology. She was certainly brave and resourceful, but she wasn't an {Amazon;} she is the subject of a tragedy by Sophocles. (Penthesilia, renowned for her courage, skill in battle, and wisdom, killed many Greek heroes at Ilium until she faced Achilles in single {combat;} after a close-fought bout he defeated her. Melanippe was captured by Heracles when he came seeking Hippolyte's girdle for his Ninth Labor, and his men attempted to bring her back to Greece.

She staged a mutiny and took over the ship, slaying all of Heracles' fighting-men. Myrine is said to have conquered Atlantis, and then lost it through the Atlanteans' treachery.

She went on to conquer Lesbos, Samothrace and Lemnos, before dying in battle in Thrace.)
7. This princess of Thebes loved her brother so well that she proudly and willingly risked her life to preserve his honor. Specifically, it was ordered that his body be allowed to lie and rot rather than receive funeral honors (which probably would have meant a more horrible afterlife for her brother's shade, as well as the insult to his earthly status). She disobeyed the decree and buried her brother's corpse, for which she died. Who was she?

Answer: Antigone

Antigone was the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta (thus also Jocasta's grand-daughter). Her brothers Polynices and Eteocles were meant to alternate as rulers of Thebes, but Eteocles refused to cede the throne at the end of the first year. In the great battle that ensued, it was decided that seven simultaneous single combats, one at each of Thebes' seven gates, would decide the outcome (this was the famous 'Seven Against Thebes'). Eteocles' camp was triumphant, but (obedient to their father's curse) Polynices and Eteocles had killed one another simultaneously. Creon succeeded the brothers to the throne, and formally ordered that Eteocles receive funeral honors, but that the corpse of Polynices be denied them. Antigone must then decide between conflicting loyalties, and resolves the dilemma by abjuring mere human law in favor of piety and familial duty. Creon orders her locked in solitary confinement to starve.

The prophet Tiresias arrives, and points out that Antigone is in the right in the eyes of the gods. Creon sees the folly of his harsh application of the letter of the law, and rushes to free her, only to find that she has already ended her own life. Antigone is the subject of Sophocles' greatest tragedy.
8. This proud Queen of Lydia actually owned Heracles as a slave for a period of time. During this period she dominated him utterly, forcing him to wear women's clothing and to perform traditionally distaff tasks, while she wore his lion's-skin cloak and brandished his club. She is said to have punished him for clumsiness by beating him with her slipper. Who was she?

Answer: Omphale

Heracles had recently slain Iphitus, son of Eurytus and Prince of Oechalia (Heracles, a married man, was angry that Eurytus would not give Heracles his daughter Iole as a concubine). Heracles therefore sought purification from the Pythia, the Oracle at Delphi.

The Pythia refused to purify him, so he attempted to make off with the sacred tripod appertaining to the oracle, claiming he intended to set up a rival oracle of his own. Apollo intervened to prevent the theft, and a fight ensued. Zeus stepped in, ending the fight and requiring the oracle to come up with a purification task for the hot-headed godling.

The Pythia finally indicated that Heracles must serve as a slave to a woman for one year. He was subsequently sold to Omphale, who really made the most of having him in her power.

But if you ask me, if he hadn't enjoyed having his skirts lifted and his bottom paddled by a woman with strong hands, he wouldn't have put up with it.
9. This woman, born a princess of Phoenicia, fled her home city of Tyre after her brother's treachery to found a new kingdom, drawing only upon her wits, a little gold, and a handful of men. Through cunning, she was able to purchase the site of a great city -- Carthage -- for the price of the area of ground that could be covered with a bull's hide. She made the bargain and then cut the hide of the bull into a very long, impossibly thin strip, which she used to encircle a vast area. Who was this clever and resourceful queen of Carthage?

Answer: Dido

Dido later fell in love with Aphrodite's son Aeneas, as he fled the Trojan War. She aided him and loved him, but was ultimately spurned by him, since he was ambitious to found his own great city -- Rome -- rather than live a pampered life in hers. She took her own life in her {grief;} this story is told in the Aeneid.
10. This woman, subject of a play by Euripides, was the wife of Admetus. When she learned that her husband had not long to live, her love for him was so strong that she was willing to make a bargain with the Fates to trade her life for his, dying in his place. Admetus, recovered from his illness after her self-sacrifice, was unable to bear the misfortune of surviving his loving {wife;} his grief and his wife's beautiful gesture inspired Heracles to enter Hades, wrestle Thanatos, and return to the land of the living with Admetus' wife restored to full vigor. Who was this paragon of courage and love?

Answer: Alcestis

Apollo's son Asclepius, the healer, had brought Hippolytus back to life, an infringement upon the prerogatives of the gods and of the Fates which enraged Zeus to the point of slaying Asclepius with a thunderbolt. Apollo, incensed at his son's death, slew the Cyclops who had forged the thunderbolt. Zeus, bitter at the death of his Cyclops, ordered Apollo to live for one year as slave of Admetus, king of Pherae.

It seems that Apollo ended up liking Admetus, or perhaps he was worried about the effectiveness of his purification task, but in any event, when he discovered that Admetus had but a short time to live, he petitioned the gods to extend the king's life.

The Fates agreed to do so, but only on the condition that someone else volunteer to die in his place. Even Admetus' aging parents were unwilling to face death for {him;} only Alcestis' love and courage were equal to the prospect.
Source: Author xaosdog

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor CellarDoor before going online.
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