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Quiz about Write in Chicago
Quiz about Write in Chicago

Write in Chicago Trivia Quiz


Chicago is known as the "city that works," the source of "windy" politicians and a home of the blues. But Chicago has also been the source of many notable writers. How many of these can you identify?

A multiple-choice quiz by Aliquis. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Aliquis
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
362,552
Updated
Feb 26 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
344
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. "Hog Butcher for the World, Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat ..." is the famous beginning of a poem entitled "Chicago." Who was the poet? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. This author is known for his depiction of the gritty underside of society such as his Chicago-based award-winning novel "The Man with a Golden Arm." His non-fiction "Chicago: City on the Make" is an essay describing Chicago's history as having been controlled by corrupt politicians, gangsters and hustlers. Despite all this, the author insists that Chicago is the only city that he could love. Who is this author? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Although primarily a newspaper columnist who often drew on the experiences of his fictionalized friend Slats Grobnik, a working-class Polish-American. He also penned the unauthorized biography "Boss: Richard J. Daley of Chicago" published in 1971 while Daley was still in office. Who was this notable Chicago columnist? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. "Presumed Innocent" and "Burden of Proof" are the first two of a string of thrillers rooted in the legal system. Who was this practicing Chicago lawyer and author? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Which Chicago writer is primarily remembered for his oral histories including: "Division Street America" about Chicago residents, "Hard Times" about the Great Depression and "The Good War" about World War II? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Famous for his design of buildings and the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition (commonly known as the World's Fair), this architect wrote the "Plan of Chicago," which in 1909 became the first comprehensive plan for urban development. Who was this great Chicago architect? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This film critic spent over 45 years writing reviews for the "Chicago Sun-Times"; this writer is best known for his film reviews on TV as well as the script for a best-forgotten B-movie, "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls." Who is this Chicago icon?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. V.I. Warshawski is a fictional female private investigator from Chicago in over a dozen novels. Which Chicago author conceived this strong-willed, hard-drinking, Polish detective? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. This native of a Chicago suburb won both the Pulitzer Prize and the Nobel Prize for Literature. After he left the Chicago area, he had little to do with it, although there appears to be little evidence that he actually referred to his hometown of Oak Park as "a village of broad lawns and narrow minds." Who is this novelist? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. This successful Chicago businessman wrote children's stories including over 50 novels, 80 short stories and 200 poems. However, a single work, "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" is one of the most memorable children's stories in the world. Who created this memorable work? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "Hog Butcher for the World, Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat ..." is the famous beginning of a poem entitled "Chicago." Who was the poet?

Answer: Carl Sandburg

"Chicago Poems," published in 1916, was one of Sandburg's early poetry books. Born in Galesburg IL, Sandburg spent much of his adult life in the Chicago suburbs of Evanston and Elmhurst. Although he ultimately moved to an estate in North Carolina, he still maintained his warm feelings for Chicago and Illinois.
2. This author is known for his depiction of the gritty underside of society such as his Chicago-based award-winning novel "The Man with a Golden Arm." His non-fiction "Chicago: City on the Make" is an essay describing Chicago's history as having been controlled by corrupt politicians, gangsters and hustlers. Despite all this, the author insists that Chicago is the only city that he could love. Who is this author?

Answer: Nelson Algren

Although he was born in Detroit, Nelson Algren became a Chicagoan at age three. Algren was a prolific writer of short stories as well as novels and won many recognitions. However, he never achieved widespread popular recognition as an author, possibly due to the nature of the characters about whom he wrote.
3. Although primarily a newspaper columnist who often drew on the experiences of his fictionalized friend Slats Grobnik, a working-class Polish-American. He also penned the unauthorized biography "Boss: Richard J. Daley of Chicago" published in 1971 while Daley was still in office. Who was this notable Chicago columnist?

Answer: Mike Royko

During his 30-year newspaper career in Chicago, Mike Royko covered the local political beat first for the "Chicago Daily News" followed by the "Chicago Sun-Times" and finally the "Chicago Tribune." Noted for his forthrightness, Royko had no qualms about criticizing those in government who failed to serve the people.

His biography of Mayor Richard J. Daley tells the unvarnished story of the achievements and shortcomings produced by Daley's rise to power.
4. "Presumed Innocent" and "Burden of Proof" are the first two of a string of thrillers rooted in the legal system. Who was this practicing Chicago lawyer and author?

Answer: Scott Turow

A Chicago native, Scott Turow became an Assistant US Attorney in Chicago and prosecuted some notable cases including the "Operation Greylord" corruption cases in the 1980s. Turow left the US Attorney's office and wrote a series of crime stories in which lawyers and the legal system play a central role. Several of his bestsellers including the two in the question have also been made into movies.

As of 2013, Turow remains a partner in a Chicago law firm.
5. Which Chicago writer is primarily remembered for his oral histories including: "Division Street America" about Chicago residents, "Hard Times" about the Great Depression and "The Good War" about World War II?

Answer: Studs Terkel

Although born in New York, Studs grew to love his adopted city. An unabashed liberal, Studs had a law degree from the University of Chicago. His specialty was talking with people. Many of his books are compilations of interviews with ordinary people about their experiences. Terkel's book "Hard Times: An Oral History of the Great Depression" won a Pulitzer Prize.

In addition to writing, Studs hosted a daily hour-long radio interview program for 45 years.
6. Famous for his design of buildings and the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition (commonly known as the World's Fair), this architect wrote the "Plan of Chicago," which in 1909 became the first comprehensive plan for urban development. Who was this great Chicago architect?

Answer: Daniel Burnham

At the beginning of the 20th century, Chicago was a crowded, industrial city. Burnham's plan, modeled after Paris, envisioned Chicago as a beautiful city with wide boulevards, numerous parks and a lakefront open for all the people. Burnham's work was not limited to Chicago but included significant structures in New York and Washington DC and city plans for Cleveland, San Francisco and Manila in the Philippines. Throughout his career, Burnham maintained his home and offices in Chicago.
7. This film critic spent over 45 years writing reviews for the "Chicago Sun-Times"; this writer is best known for his film reviews on TV as well as the script for a best-forgotten B-movie, "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls." Who is this Chicago icon?

Answer: Roger Ebert

The first person to win a Pulitzer Prize for Criticism, Ebert's reviews reflected his love of the cinema and his deep-felt preferences of what is good and bad on the screen. Ebert also demonstrated his enthusiasm through his frequent participation in lectures, seminars, essays and other public forums, even after suffering cancer of the thyroid and salivary glands. Ebert continued writing until shortly before his death in 2013.
8. V.I. Warshawski is a fictional female private investigator from Chicago in over a dozen novels. Which Chicago author conceived this strong-willed, hard-drinking, Polish detective?

Answer: Sara Paretsky

After growing up in rural Kansas, Paretsky attended the University of Chicago where she received both a PhD in History and an MBA. Paretsky's novels have been influential in transforming the image of women in mystery novels into one more equal with their male counterparts. Likewise, Paretsky has been active encouraging other female mystery writers and helped found the organization "Sisters of Crime."
9. This native of a Chicago suburb won both the Pulitzer Prize and the Nobel Prize for Literature. After he left the Chicago area, he had little to do with it, although there appears to be little evidence that he actually referred to his hometown of Oak Park as "a village of broad lawns and narrow minds." Who is this novelist?

Answer: Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway lived a colorful life. After he was wounded driving an ambulance on the front in WW I, he lived as an expatriate in Paris. He worked as a journalist in both the Spanish Civil War and WW II. Hemingway turned his experiences into novels establishing a terse, journalistic writing style in his fiction.

Injuries from two plane crashes while on an African safari resulted in chronic pain and deteriorating health. Ultimately Hemingway took is own life at his home in Ketchum ID in 1961.
10. This successful Chicago businessman wrote children's stories including over 50 novels, 80 short stories and 200 poems. However, a single work, "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" is one of the most memorable children's stories in the world. Who created this memorable work?

Answer: L. Frank Baum

Originally from upstate New York, Baum had a wide variety of jobs including making barrels for Pennsylvania oil, breeding exotic species of poultry, selling fireworks and operating a store in South Dakota, all with varying degrees of success. Moving to Chicago as a reporter, Baum began writing children's stories.

In 1900 Baum published his most famous work "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz," which became one of the most popular movies of all time. Over the next two decades it was followed by nearly 20 sequels which are nearly unknown today.
Source: Author Aliquis

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