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Quiz about Eleven Pipers Piping
Quiz about Eleven Pipers Piping

Eleven Pipers Piping Trivia Quiz


The line from the Christmas song may evoke images of tartan-clad players marching around with their Great Highland Bagpipes, but there are many other forms of bagpipe to be found around the world - here are ten of them.

A photo quiz by looney_tunes. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
looney_tunes
Time
4 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
355,993
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
1678
Awards
Editor's Choice
Last 3 plays: driver88 (7/10), xchasbox (9/10), slay01 (9/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. These uillean pipes are usually played by a seated piper, who uses his elbow to squeeze the bellows that inflate the bag. Their name comes from the Irish word 'uille', meaning what? Hint


photo quiz
Question 2 of 10
2. The sackpipa was once commonly played in a Norse country, but had virtually disappeared before one surviving traditional piper, Gudmunds Nils Larsson (1892-1949) was discovered in western Dalarna. What country saw a subsequent revival of this traditional instrument? Hint


photo quiz
Question 3 of 10
3. The torupill, also called kitsepill, lootspill, or kotepill, is played in the Baltic nation of Estonia. While most traditional bagpipes had air sacks formed from the skin of a local animal, the torupill was often made using the stomach of what aquatic mammal? Hint


photo quiz
Question 4 of 10
4. This picture is of an 18th century 'musette de cour'. In which country's courts did this instrument appear starting at the end of the 16th century? Hint


photo quiz
Question 5 of 10
5. The 'gaita de foles' is a traditional Iberian bagpipe. Which of these is the name for the regional variant shown here?

Hint


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Question 6 of 10
6. This picture shows street musicians playing a 'piffero' (the small woodwind instrument on the left) and a 'zampogna' (the large bagpipe on the right). In the southern part of which boot-shaped Mediterranean country might Giorgio Sommer have taken the original photograph? Hint


photo quiz
Question 7 of 10
7. This gaida (also spelled gajda, gayda, gajde, gajda and gajdy in nearby countries) is a traditional instrument of which Balkan country that borders the Black Sea? Hint


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Question 8 of 10
8. The traditional bagpipe of Azerbaijan is called the tulum. What feature of the tulum makes it different from most other bagpipes? Hint


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Question 9 of 10
9. The mizwad is an unusual type of bagpipe because it has which of these on the ends of the two chanters? Hint


photo quiz
Question 10 of 10
10. This 19th century drawing of a sruti upanga, a bagpipe from Tamil Nadu in southern India, shows its reed separately, as well as an external view of the assembled instrument. What is unusual about this instrument when it is played? Hint


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Most Recent Scores
Apr 13 2024 : driver88: 7/10
Apr 11 2024 : xchasbox: 9/10
Apr 11 2024 : slay01: 9/10
Mar 05 2024 : Guest 31: 7/10
Mar 04 2024 : Guest 173: 9/10
Mar 04 2024 : Guest 208: 3/10
Mar 04 2024 : Guest 64: 4/10
Mar 04 2024 : Guest 204: 8/10
Mar 03 2024 : Guest 104: 4/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. These uillean pipes are usually played by a seated piper, who uses his elbow to squeeze the bellows that inflate the bag. Their name comes from the Irish word 'uille', meaning what?

Answer: Elbow

A uillean piper wears bellows strapped to their waist, positioned so that they can activate them by raising and lowering their elbow. This means the player does not need to blow into the bag to keep it inflated, and allows the piper to sing as well as play.

The chanter has a larger range of notes available than is the case for many types of pipe, and the regulators allow the player to produce a variety of chord effects. Because their playing is so complex, beginners often start out with a practice set (consisting only of bellows, bag and chanter); once the basic technique of producing sound has been mastered, drones are added to form a half set; finally, regulators are added to produce a full set.
2. The sackpipa was once commonly played in a Norse country, but had virtually disappeared before one surviving traditional piper, Gudmunds Nils Larsson (1892-1949) was discovered in western Dalarna. What country saw a subsequent revival of this traditional instrument?

Answer: Sweden

From such evidence as medieval stained glass windows, it seems that bagpipes were once common around Sweden from the 14th century on, but they gradually died out of common use because other instruments became more popular. In the 1930s, Matts Rehnberg wrote a thesis on the sackpipa (literally bagpipes in Swedish), and searched the country until he found Larsson, who knew and played for recordings several traditional tunes. Starting in the 1980s, a modern version which combined features of the dozen or so instruments to be found in museums was developed, a version which fits in more easily when played with other instruments than was the case for most earlier models (one of the reasons for their decline in popularity).

The picture shows Olle Gallmo, a leading contemporary player who in 2008 earned the title of riksspelman, or National Folk Musician, as winner of a silver Zorn badge, awarded to performers in the annual Zorn trials for folk musicians performing traditional music on traditional instruments.
3. The torupill, also called kitsepill, lootspill, or kotepill, is played in the Baltic nation of Estonia. While most traditional bagpipes had air sacks formed from the skin of a local animal, the torupill was often made using the stomach of what aquatic mammal?

Answer: Grey seal

Apparently the stomach of a grey seal was resistant to changing humidity, so performed well in both dry and wet weather. Bags were also made from stomachs of domestic animals such as an ox or a dog; more rarely, they were formed from animal skins, with the fur on the outside.

The picture shows the traditional stomach shape (although, being a modern picture, it is quite possible that the instrument is actually made from a synthetic material). The bag is inflated by blowing through the mouth-pipe; the bag is squeezed to produce air flow over the single-reed chanter, usually made from pine or juniper, which is fingered to produce the various notes; the wooden drone pipe at the bottom contains a wood bell, and can have its length adjusted to produce the desired pitch for the drone note.
4. This picture is of an 18th century 'musette de cour'. In which country's courts did this instrument appear starting at the end of the 16th century?

Answer: France

Like the uillean pipes, the musette's bag was inflated by bellows. Its most distinctive features were the presence of two double-reed chanters (called the 'grand chalameau' and the 'petit chalameau') and a cylindrical drone containing four reeds and a number of sliders ('layettes') that moved on runners ('coulisses').

As the instrument evolved, the chanters became more complex and the drone simpler. The musette sounded something like an oboe, and was considered a suitable court instrument both because the use of 'common' instruments was intriguing, and because the bellows meant there was no need to blow into it, which was considered rather unseemly.

After the French Revolution at the end of the 18th century, the musette was seen as decadent, and simpler forms of bagpipe gained popularity.
5. The 'gaita de foles' is a traditional Iberian bagpipe. Which of these is the name for the regional variant shown here?

Answer: Galician gaita

The gaita is the name for bagpipes used in the northwestern part of Spain, especially Galicia and Asturias, and in northern Portugal. Each region has its own specific variant on the theme, usually named for the region. The 'gaita galega' comes from Galicia, the 'gaita asturiana' from Asturias, the 'gaita aragonesa' from Aragon, etc.

The name 'gaita' may come from the fact that the bag of a gaita is made from the skin of a goat. The various pipes can be seen to be inserted in the holes formed at the points where the neck and legs were attached to the body.

The player's left arm controls the airflow from the bag, the bass drone lies on the left shoulder, up to two smaller drones rest on the right arm, and both hands are used to finger seven holes on the chanter.
6. This picture shows street musicians playing a 'piffero' (the small woodwind instrument on the left) and a 'zampogna' (the large bagpipe on the right). In the southern part of which boot-shaped Mediterranean country might Giorgio Sommer have taken the original photograph?

Answer: Italy

The zampogna was a traditional instrument found through most of southern Italy, as well as Sicily. As was the case in many parts of the world, their use had dwindled before the revival of interest in traditional instruments that occurred world-wide in the second half of the 20th century.

The zampogna bag was traditionally made from the skin of a goat or sheep, carefully removed in one piece, and turned inside out with the hair left on. The rear legs were tied off, as was one of the front legs.

The other front leg held the blow pipe, and the chanters and drones were fitted into a round stock that was inserted into the neck. Chanters can be almost any size, from a few inches to the height of a person, and vary in number from region to region.
7. This gaida (also spelled gajda, gayda, gajde, gajda and gajdy in nearby countries) is a traditional instrument of which Balkan country that borders the Black Sea?

Answer: Bulgaria

The Bulgarian word is gaida, while the other spellings are used in Albania, Turkey, Serbia, Macedonia, and Slovakia, in that order. The gaida is made from a whole goat skin, turned inside out so that the hair helps control the moisture (from the player's breath) on the inside of the bag.

The instrument is put together before the skin has been cured, and the first stage of owning your own gaida is treating it to remove the dead animal smell (which can be quite overpowering). Treatment varies regionally, but involves daily application of the chosen curative, whether that be salt, flour, wood ash or milk (or a combination) for several months.

It is a very long couple of months for the other members of the household!
8. The traditional bagpipe of Azerbaijan is called the tulum. What feature of the tulum makes it different from most other bagpipes?

Answer: It has no drone

The tulum probably originated in Turkey. Unlike the gaida and other bagpipes of the region, it has no drone. The bag is made from the skin of (you have probably guessed it) a sheep or goat, from which the hair is removed in the early part of processing.

The tulum is a popular dance instrument among nomadic people in the region. Apparently it is traditional to wash the bag out with raki (homemade brandy) after use, to help prevent bacterial growth.
9. The mizwad is an unusual type of bagpipe because it has which of these on the ends of the two chanters?

Answer: Cow horns

The mizwad or mezoued (from an Arabic word meaning bag) is primarily found in Tunisia. The double-barrelled chanter is attached to the wooden stock that fits into the neck hole of the animal skin from which the bag is made, with the reeds inside the bag. Each cane tube is topped with a cow horn, held in place by string tying them to the wooden stock.

The blowpipe can be a cane tube, as in this example, or it may be formed out of a bone from a bird's wing.
10. This 19th century drawing of a sruti upanga, a bagpipe from Tamil Nadu in southern India, shows its reed separately, as well as an external view of the assembled instrument. What is unusual about this instrument when it is played?

Answer: It only plays one note

Although you can see holes in the drone pipe (the larger one shown), they are only there so that the note to be played can be adjusted by appropriate application of wax to seal some of them. It was usually used as an accompaniment to the oboe-like mukha veena rather than as a solo performance instrument.
Source: Author looney_tunes

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor ertrum before going online.
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