Quiz about Scotts Antarctic Adventurers
Quiz about Scotts Antarctic Adventurers

Scott's Antarctic Adventurers Trivia Quiz


One of the major aims of Scott's 1910-13 expedition was to reach the South Pole. Here are some of the men involved in that heroic and tragic enterprise.

A matching quiz by davejacobs. Estimated time: 5 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. People Trivia
  6. »
  7. Explorers
  8. »
  9. Antarctic

Author
davejacobs
Time
5 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
397,786
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
89
Mobile instructions: Press on an answer on the right. Then, press on the gray box it matches on the left.
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. This Irishman had been a fur trader in Siberia, and had been sent by Scott to Siberia to buy the sledge dogs, and was responsible for all the dogs used by the expedition. He often failed to see eye to eye with Scott.  
Henry Bowers
2. This young man with the aristocratic name, a recent Oxford graduate, with no particular qualifications for the Antarctic, paid 1000 of his own money as a contribution to the expedition. He was taken on with the title of Zoologist, assistant to Dr Wilson. He later wrote a best-selling book about the expedition, entitled "The Worst Journey In The World".  
Dimitri Gerof
3. This Irishman, a veteran of Antarctic exploration, had been on Scott's earlier expedition, and was to perform heroically with Shackleton's expedition in 1914. Returning as part of the final support group, he saved the lives of two companions when he set out to walk 35 miles in the snow with no food but a few biscuits and a little stick of chocolate.  
William Lashly
4. This Welsh Petty Officer, one of the five men who reached the Pole, died on the return journey after a fall on the Beardmore Glacier. According to Scott he was "a man of Herculean strength".  
Tom Crean
5. This army captain, on his birthday, March 17th, walked out of the tent into the blizzard, so as not to be a burden any longer to his companions.  
Apsley Cherry-Garrard
6. This is the young dog-driver who had been signed up at the time the dogs were bought in Russia.  
Tryggve Gran
7. One of the last three men to be sent back from the polar plateau, this officer collapsed with scurvy and snow blindness but was saved by the heroism of his companions. He was later to achieve high rank in the Royal Navy.  
Lawrence Oates
8. This Naval Petty Officer from Hampshire was another veteran of the 1901 Antarctic expedition, and was awarded the Albert Medal for helping to save Lt Evans when he was suffering from scurvy and snow-blindness on their return from the Polar Plateau. He kept a diary which was eventually published as the book "Under Scott's Command".   
Edgar Evans
9. Known as "Birdie", this hardy man had been a naval officer in India, and was "Commissariat officer" in Scott's expedition. He died with Scott in their blizzard stricken tent.   
Cecil Meares
10. A young sub-lieutenant in the Norwegian navy was selected as a skiing instructor, but was under-used. Later he joined Bleriot's flying school, and became the first man to cross the North Sea in a heavier-than-air craft.  
Lt Edward Evans






Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This Irishman had been a fur trader in Siberia, and had been sent by Scott to Siberia to buy the sledge dogs, and was responsible for all the dogs used by the expedition. He often failed to see eye to eye with Scott.

Answer: Cecil Meares

Cecil Henry Meares, 1877-1937.
Scott: "Meares is excellent to a point.... Meares, I think, rather imagined himself racing to the pole and back on a dog sledge. His journey has opened his eyes a good deal."
Scott's scepticism about using dogs is somewhat pathetic, since that is exactly what Amundsen did when his party reached the South Pole first.
Meares' adventurous spirit sometimes made it difficult for him to follow Scott's orders. He resigned from the expedition after he got back to base and in March 1912 he left on the Terra Nova for New Zealand.
2. This young man with the aristocratic name, a recent Oxford graduate, with no particular qualifications for the Antarctic, paid 1000 of his own money as a contribution to the expedition. He was taken on with the title of Zoologist, assistant to Dr Wilson. He later wrote a best-selling book about the expedition, entitled "The Worst Journey In The World".

Answer: Apsley Cherry-Garrard

Apsley George Benet Cherry-Garrard, 1886 - 1959.
Scott: "his whole heart is in the life (open air), with profound eagerness to help everyone... Sound all through and pretty hard also."
This bespectacled young man was one of the three men who made the famous "winter journey" across Ross Island , in almost total darkness and with temperatures often below -70F in the Antarctic winter of July 1911.
3. This Irishman, a veteran of Antarctic exploration, had been on Scott's earlier expedition, and was to perform heroically with Shackleton's expedition in 1914. Returning as part of the final support group, he saved the lives of two companions when he set out to walk 35 miles in the snow with no food but a few biscuits and a little stick of chocolate.

Answer: Tom Crean

Thomas Crean (20 July 1877-27 July 1938), was an Irish seaman and Antarctic explorer who was awarded the Albert Medal for Lifesaving.
Scott: "Crean is perfectly happy, ready to do anything and go anywhere, the harder the work, the better".
Tom Crean is one of the outstanding figures in Antarctic exploration.
4. This Welsh Petty Officer, one of the five men who reached the Pole, died on the return journey after a fall on the Beardmore Glacier. According to Scott he was "a man of Herculean strength".

Answer: Edgar Evans

Edgar Evans, 1876-1912.
He had been on Scott's 1901 Antarctic expedition, and was considered the strongest and most resourceful of the expedition members. He fell and suffered probable concussion during the trek down the Beardmore and his condition deteriorated during this journey until his final collapse and death on Feb 18th. His burial place near the bottom of the Beardmore Glacier has never been discovered.
5. This army captain, on his birthday, March 17th, walked out of the tent into the blizzard, so as not to be a burden any longer to his companions.

Answer: Lawrence Oates

Lawrence Edward Grace Oates, 1880-1912.
Scott, referring to the use of ponies:" Oates is splendid with them. - I do not know what we should do without him."
Nick-named "Titus", he had been in charge of the ponies until they were finally sacrificed at Shambles Depot at the foot of the Beardmore Glacier. Oates was born into a wealthy family in 1888, and went to Eton, but left early due to ill health. Serving in the cavalry in the Boer War he was shot in one leg, leaving it shorter than the other. His experience with horses (and a contribution of 1000) got him into Scott's expedition.
Although he and Scott did not get on very well, this was forgotten when he made his final sacrifice. "I am just going outside, and may be some time" was what Scott quoted in his diary when Oates walked out of the tent.
An unsuccessful attempt was made to find his body the following spring, when a cairn with a cross was erected at roughly the right place, inscribed "Hereabouts died a very gallant gentleman, Captain L.E.G. Oates of the Iniskilling Dragoons..."
6. This is the young dog-driver who had been signed up at the time the dogs were bought in Russia.

Answer: Dimitri Gerof

Scott: "He is an excellent boy, full of intelligence." Dmitri Gerov - his names are transliterated in many different ways - was born around 1888 in Sakhalin, to the east of Siberia, and he was running a mail service over the Sea of Okhotsk when Meares arrived seeking to buy sledge dogs for Scott's Antarctic expedition. For his help he was offered a job with the expedition in which he performed efficiently and cheerfully.

When the expedition ended he travelled to England, then back to New Zealand, and finally returned to Russia to work in the Nikolayevsk gold mines.

He had a heart attack and died in 1932.
7. One of the last three men to be sent back from the polar plateau, this officer collapsed with scurvy and snow blindness but was saved by the heroism of his companions. He was later to achieve high rank in the Royal Navy.

Answer: Lt Edward Evans

Admiral Edward Ratcliffe Garth Russell Evans, 1st Baron Mountevans KCB, DSO, SGM (28 October 1880-20 August 1957).
Scott: "Lt Evans, with a clear-minded zeal in his own work, does it with all the success of result which comes from the taking of pains."
Evans had been a member of Scott's first expedition in 1901, and was second in command of the current expedition. On the polar plateau he was showing symptoms of scurvy and snow-blindness, and was sent back with two sturdy companions. He rose to become an Admiral and was made a peer in 1945. He wrote his own book "South With Scott" on his Antarctic experiences, dedicated to the two men who saved his life on this return journey, Crean and Lashly.
8. This Naval Petty Officer from Hampshire was another veteran of the 1901 Antarctic expedition, and was awarded the Albert Medal for helping to save Lt Evans when he was suffering from scurvy and snow-blindness on their return from the Polar Plateau. He kept a diary which was eventually published as the book "Under Scott's Command".

Answer: William Lashly

William Lashly, 1867-1940, was the son of a farm worker in Hambledon, Hampshire.
Scott: "Lashly is his old self in every respect, hard working to the limit, quiet, abstemious, and determined."
In 1969, William Lashly's diaries were edited and published by Commander A R Ellis. "Under Scott's Command: Lashly's Antarctic Diaries" provides insight into both the Discovery and the Terra Nova expeditions from the perspective of one of the men rather than the more common accounts published by officers.
9. Known as "Birdie", this hardy man had been a naval officer in India, and was "Commissariat officer" in Scott's expedition. He died with Scott in their blizzard stricken tent.

Answer: Henry Bowers

Henry Robertson Bowers, 1883-1912.
Scott: "Bowers is all and more than I ever expected of him. He is a positive treasure, absolutely trustworthy and prodigiously energetic."
Although quite short he was outstandingly energetic, as was demonstrated when he went on the formidable winter journey with Wilson and Cherry-Garrard.
10. A young sub-lieutenant in the Norwegian navy was selected as a skiing instructor, but was under-used. Later he joined Bleriot's flying school, and became the first man to cross the North Sea in a heavier-than-air craft.

Answer: Tryggve Gran

Jens Tryggve Herman Gran DSC, MC (20 January 1888- 8 January 1980).
Tryggve Gran was born in Bergen, Norway, growing up in an affluent shipbuilding family. He once played football for Norway against Sweden in 1908. His interest in aviation led him to join the Royal Flying Corps in the First World War and he was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry.
Source: Author davejacobs

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
3/29/2023, Copyright 2023 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us