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Quiz about Youre in the Army NowGlobal Stars in the Service
Quiz about Youre in the Army NowGlobal Stars in the Service

You're in the Army Now-Global Stars in the Service Quiz


Almost everyone knows Elvis Presley was in the U.S. Army, John F. Kennedy in the Navy, and that Prince Harry served in the British Army. Many other famous people also served their countries with honor. Here are ten.

A multiple-choice quiz by paulmallon. Estimated time: 7 mins.
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Author
paulmallon
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
359,149
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
676
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. You will probably know me best from many of the 40 movies I made. I appeared in such films as "The Guns of Navarone" (1961), "Lawrence of Arabia" (1961), "The Wrong Man" (1956), and "The Fall of the Roman Empire" (1956). Before cutting my teeth in cinema, I had the honor of fighting for my country in WWII. I was primarily a major with the Royal Artillery, and in 1952 I was named a Commander of the Order of British Empire (C.B.E.) Who do you reckon I am? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Pat Tillman was an All-American success story. He maintained a GPA of 3.85 at Arizona State University while excelling on the football team as their star linebacker. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in May, 2002 and participated in the the earliest Iraq strikes. Later he joined the Rangers. His life would end on the battlefields in Afghanistan, as a member of the 75th Ranger Regiment on April 22, 2004. How was he killed? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Different people have varied reasons for joining the armed services. Some are enthralled by Hollywood heroics, soldiers getting medals, and waving from a parade float through their hometown, upon their safe return (naturally with a pretty girl by their side). What motivated Jimi Hendrix, the man "Rolling Stone" named as the Greatest Guitarist of All Time, to join the Army? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. If I asked you if you knew who Joseph Wapner is, would you know? How about if I asked if you had heard of "Judge Wapner"? Same guy. He graduated from U.S.C in 1941, and then spent 1942-1944 in the U.S. Army, fighting in the Pacific during WWII. His actions earned him a Bronze Star and he received a Purple Heart after almost being killed by a Japanese sniper. He was honorably discharged holding the rank of Lieutenant. Later in life he would host TV's, "The People's Court" for just short of 2,500 episodes (2,4840)from 1981-1993. After a brief hiatus, the show came back on in 1997.
Who replaced Joseph Wapner as the new judge?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Over a five decade career, Charles Durning appeared in several hundred roles in the theater, TV, and motion pictures. He was a pretty good hoofer too, and taught dancing at a Fred Astaire studio in N.Y. But the fun and games would have to wait as he joined the men fighting WWII, at the age of 20.
In which branch of the U.S. Armed Forces did the heroic Charles Durning serve?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Many great athletes from all sports have interrupted their careers to fight for their country. One such man was the winningest left-handed pitcher in history through the end of 2012. He won 20 games in a season 13 times, and tossed two no-hitters. Then came WWII, and he joined the Army on December 13, 1942. He was decorated for his fighting in The Battle of the Bulge as a member of the 276th Engineer Battalion, and won a Battlefield Promotion to Second Lieutenant. Can you pick this prolific and patriotic pitcher. Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. James Stewart was the first Hollywood "super star" to don the Air Force uniform during WWII. Fightin' was in his blood as his forebearers had fought in the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the Civil War. When he retired after 27 years in the Air Force in 1968, he held the rank of Brigadier General. Years later he was promoted to Major General, Ret. Which Commander-in-Chief granted that most deserved promotion? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Writer-cartoonist, Theodor Geisel was born March 2, 1904. He was educated in the Ivy League at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, and later at Oxford University in England. When he joined the Army in 1943, he worked mostly on producing propaganda films and cartoons aimed at bolstering peace after the cessation of WWII. By what name did he later become more famous? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. No quiz about bravery under fire would be complete without honoring the service of Audie Murphy. He told a little fib about his age in order to join the Army. By the time WWII had ended, Murphy was its most decorated soldier. He rose to first lieutenant and won 33 awards, including The Medal of Honor.
He is believed to have killed over 200 German soldiers. His story is told in the film, "To Hell and Back" (1955). What actor plays Audie Murphy in "To Hell and Back?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Our final honoree, one of TV's "Golden Girls", enlisted in the Marines when she was 21 years old. While in the Corps, she met and married a fellow Marine, with the surname by which she became a star. Her first job was banging away on a typewriter (remember them?), at Marine Corps HQ, in Washington D.C. She would wind up spending about two and a half years in the service, rising to the rank of Staff Sergeant before being honorably discharged in September 1945.
Can you guess which Golden Girl was a grand gyrine? (That's slang for a U.S. Marine, by the way).
Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. You will probably know me best from many of the 40 movies I made. I appeared in such films as "The Guns of Navarone" (1961), "Lawrence of Arabia" (1961), "The Wrong Man" (1956), and "The Fall of the Roman Empire" (1956). Before cutting my teeth in cinema, I had the honor of fighting for my country in WWII. I was primarily a major with the Royal Artillery, and in 1952 I was named a Commander of the Order of British Empire (C.B.E.) Who do you reckon I am?

Answer: Anthony Quayle

Anthony Quayle is, in my opinion, one of the classiest actors ever to come out of England, or any other place else for that matter. He learned his craft at The Royal Academy in foggy Londontown and played many Shakesperian roles, including Othello, Falstaff and Henry VIII.
He received an Academy Award Nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Cardinal Wolsey in "Anne of the Thousand Days", in 1969.
Anthony Quayle passed away October 20, 1989 at age 76.
2. Pat Tillman was an All-American success story. He maintained a GPA of 3.85 at Arizona State University while excelling on the football team as their star linebacker. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in May, 2002 and participated in the the earliest Iraq strikes. Later he joined the Rangers. His life would end on the battlefields in Afghanistan, as a member of the 75th Ranger Regiment on April 22, 2004. How was he killed?

Answer: He was killed by friendly fire.

Word came from Afghanistan that he had been killed in a firefight with enemy forces, April 22, 2004. It was months later when confirmation came, that in the frenzy of the battle, he had been killed by one of his fellow troops. Here's the kind of guy Pat Tillman was; when he enlisted in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, he walked away from a $3.5 million contract offer to play football for the next three years to fight for his country. Pat Tillman earned over a dozen medals and commendations, including The Silver Star and The Purple Heart, and was posthumously promoted to the rank of Corporal. Pat Tillman died at the age of 27.

Interesting fact: Pat Tillman was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2010.
3. Different people have varied reasons for joining the armed services. Some are enthralled by Hollywood heroics, soldiers getting medals, and waving from a parade float through their hometown, upon their safe return (naturally with a pretty girl by their side). What motivated Jimi Hendrix, the man "Rolling Stone" named as the Greatest Guitarist of All Time, to join the Army?

Answer: To avoid going to jail.

After a number of run-ins with the cops, mostly concerning his use of other people's vehicles, a judge told him he was going away for two years. Where, was up to Jimi, he could choose jail or the Army. He enlisted on May 31, 1961. After bootcamp, he was assigned to the fabled 101st Airborne Division, HQ'd at Fort Campbell, KY.

He finished his paratroop training in just eight months, and was awarded the "Screaming Eagles" patch of honor. It was pretty much downhill from there. Jimi just didn't like the Army and the Army didn't much care for the way Jimi conducted himself in uniform either. On June 29, 1962, he left the Army with an honorable discharge.

His short but legendary musical career earned him a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (1991), and he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (1992).
4. If I asked you if you knew who Joseph Wapner is, would you know? How about if I asked if you had heard of "Judge Wapner"? Same guy. He graduated from U.S.C in 1941, and then spent 1942-1944 in the U.S. Army, fighting in the Pacific during WWII. His actions earned him a Bronze Star and he received a Purple Heart after almost being killed by a Japanese sniper. He was honorably discharged holding the rank of Lieutenant. Later in life he would host TV's, "The People's Court" for just short of 2,500 episodes (2,4840)from 1981-1993. After a brief hiatus, the show came back on in 1997. Who replaced Joseph Wapner as the new judge?

Answer: Ed Koch

While "Judge Wapner" hosted the show for 12 years, Ed Koch lasted just two. The former (105th) mayor of N.Y had the bench from 1997-1999.

After his stint in the Army, Wapner continued his studies at U.S.C. Law School, and enjoyed a 20 year period as a Los Angeles judge before retiring and taking the TV gig.

Greg Mathis started hosting the "Judge Mathis Show" in 1999, Judy Sheindlin has been, "Judge Judy", since 1996, and Marilyn Milian donned the robes as the judge on "The People's Court" in 2001.

Interesting fact: While attending Hollywood H.S., Joe Wapner dated a young lady named Judy Turner. She later became the stunning actress, Lana Turner.
5. Over a five decade career, Charles Durning appeared in several hundred roles in the theater, TV, and motion pictures. He was a pretty good hoofer too, and taught dancing at a Fred Astaire studio in N.Y. But the fun and games would have to wait as he joined the men fighting WWII, at the age of 20. In which branch of the U.S. Armed Forces did the heroic Charles Durning serve?

Answer: Army

Charles Durning was among the first ashore at Omaha Beach, when Allied forces stormed the beaches at Normandy, France on June 6, 1944. He survived "the longest day", and six months later he fought at the Battle of the Bulge. In addition to winning The Silver Star and the Bronze Star, he also was awarded three Purple Hearts. One was as a result of a battle with a German soldier who bayoneted him in the leg. Durning picked up a rock and beat his attacker to death.

In thanks for the blood he spilled on French soil, Durning was presented with the National Order of the Legion of Honor by a grateful France. For his acting work, he was inducted into the Theater Hall of Fame (1999), and in 2008 he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Screen Actors Guild, and awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

He died in his sleep on December 24, 2012, and three nights later the Great White Way went dark as Broadway theaters dimmed their lights in a moment of remembrance. Private First Class Charles Durning is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
6. Many great athletes from all sports have interrupted their careers to fight for their country. One such man was the winningest left-handed pitcher in history through the end of 2012. He won 20 games in a season 13 times, and tossed two no-hitters. Then came WWII, and he joined the Army on December 13, 1942. He was decorated for his fighting in The Battle of the Bulge as a member of the 276th Engineer Battalion, and won a Battlefield Promotion to Second Lieutenant. Can you pick this prolific and patriotic pitcher.

Answer: Warren Spahn

Warren Spahn deployed to the European Theatre in December of 1944. Shortly thereafter he was awarded both a Purple Heart and a Bronze Star during the Battle of the Bulge (1944-45). "Spahnie" returned to baseball after the war and went on to rack up 363 victories, joining the exclusive 300 win club at the age of 40.
Warren Spahn was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. in 1973. He had a lot of outstanding seasons pitching in Boston, but he often commented that the one year in France, 1945, may have been his best ever.
7. James Stewart was the first Hollywood "super star" to don the Air Force uniform during WWII. Fightin' was in his blood as his forebearers had fought in the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the Civil War. When he retired after 27 years in the Air Force in 1968, he held the rank of Brigadier General. Years later he was promoted to Major General, Ret. Which Commander-in-Chief granted that most deserved promotion?

Answer: Ronald Reagan

James Stewart's rise through the Air Force was swift, going from Private to Colonel in just four years. Among the many medals and awards he won were the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, two Distinguished Flying Crosses, four Air Medals, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The French government honored Stewart by awarding him the Cross of War ("Croix de Guerre"). At the end of WWII, he stayed in the reserves, and flew again in the Vietnam War in 1966. In Hollywood he was almost as big a hero, making over 75 films and winning the Academy Award for Best Actor in "The Philadelphia Story", 1941. The American Film Institute name him the third Greatest Actor of All Time.

Not surprisingly, James Stewart has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
8. Writer-cartoonist, Theodor Geisel was born March 2, 1904. He was educated in the Ivy League at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, and later at Oxford University in England. When he joined the Army in 1943, he worked mostly on producing propaganda films and cartoons aimed at bolstering peace after the cessation of WWII. By what name did he later become more famous?

Answer: Dr. Seuss

Seuss, was actually Theodor Geisel's middle name, so not much creativity was needed to come up with a sobriquet. During his time as the commander of the Animation Department of the First Motion Picture Unit of the Army Air Forces, the good doctor earned the Legion of Merit Award.
Back in civilian life he won two Emmys, a Peabody Award, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal. Among his more popular books are "Horton Hears a Who" (1954), "How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (1957), "The Cat in the Hat" (1957), and "Green Eggs and Ham" (1960).
Dr. Seuss has been honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
9. No quiz about bravery under fire would be complete without honoring the service of Audie Murphy. He told a little fib about his age in order to join the Army. By the time WWII had ended, Murphy was its most decorated soldier. He rose to first lieutenant and won 33 awards, including The Medal of Honor. He is believed to have killed over 200 German soldiers. His story is told in the film, "To Hell and Back" (1955). What actor plays Audie Murphy in "To Hell and Back?

Answer: Audie Murphy

"To Hell and Back" stood as the biggest box office hit for Universal Studios for 20 years. ("Jaws", 1975, eclipsed it). Murphy's formal education ended in the fifth grade, and he was eventually inducted into the Army on June 30, 1942. He participated with honor in the Invasion of Sicily and was part of the forces during the liberation of Rome (1944).

After the war, Murphy became an actor and appeared in over 40 films. He also either wrote or co-wrote more than 20 songs. He was "Whispering" Smith on a 1961 western TV drama in which he played a Colorado detective. Sadly, the war took its toll on Murphy, as he slept every night with a gun under his pillow, as a result of what we now know to be P.T.S.D. (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).

In addition to his wartime accolades, Audie Murphy was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

He died in a plane crash at the age of 45, and rests in eternal peace in Arlington National Cemetery.
10. Our final honoree, one of TV's "Golden Girls", enlisted in the Marines when she was 21 years old. While in the Corps, she met and married a fellow Marine, with the surname by which she became a star. Her first job was banging away on a typewriter (remember them?), at Marine Corps HQ, in Washington D.C. She would wind up spending about two and a half years in the service, rising to the rank of Staff Sergeant before being honorably discharged in September 1945. Can you guess which Golden Girl was a grand gyrine? (That's slang for a U.S. Marine, by the way).

Answer: Bea Arthur

Beatrice Frankel, born May 13, 1922 in New York, became Bea Athur after marrying Marine Robert Arthur while they both served in World War II. Bea Arthur would go on to enjoy a career that spanned seven decades, highlighted by winning a Tony Award and two Emmys. She won the Tony for Best Actress in a Musical, when she portrayed Vera Charles on Broadway, in "Mame" (1968). Her two Emmy Awards came from her work in two different TV comedies. She won the first for her role as Maude Finley, in "Maude", which ran from 1972-1978. Her portrayal of Dorothy Zbornak, in "The Golden Girls" (1985-1992) won her the second.

Interesting fact: Bea Arthur was inducted into the TV Hall of Fame in 2008.
Source: Author paulmallon

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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