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Quiz about Birth Control Methods
Quiz about Birth Control Methods

Test yourself! Take this Birth Control Methods Quiz | Health and Human Biology


This quiz takes a look at several methods of birth control and asks questions about how they are administered, or how they work, or what names apply to which method.

A multiple-choice quiz by Billkozy. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
Billkozy
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
396,758
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
394
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. Depo Provera is the name of what kind of birth control method? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. There are two types of this T-shaped birth control method: the progestin based version, which lasts five years and the hormone-free version which lasts ten years. Which birth control device is this?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Originally introduced outside of the U.S. in 1983, Nexaplon was endorsed by the World Health Organization, and is what kind of method of birth control?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Levonorgestrel is more commonly known as what type of birth control method?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The patch works like the pill and it is recommended that a woman stick it on her stomach or another part of the body. Which area is NOT a suitable location? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. If used properly, the pill is said to be how effective? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. The minipill contains a lower dose of progestin, causing the cervical mucus to thicken, preventing pregnancy. Comparing progestin to estrogen, which of these statements is true? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. The NuvaRing, or vaginal ring, contains estrogen and progestin. It is a small flexible ring which is inserted into the vagina and left there for how long?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. With the sterilization method of birth control, which part of the female body is blocked to prevent fertilization of an egg?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Which of these statements about condoms is true?
Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Depo Provera is the name of what kind of birth control method?

Answer: An injection

Depo Provera is a shot containing the ovulation-blocking progestin, given by the doctor every three months. Women usually experience a lighter menstruation, while half of women will have no period after a year's time. A negative side effect is that it has been linked to weight gain with women gaining an average 8 pounds over two years. It is also very slow to wear off. Women might take a whole year to be able to conceive again following their last injection.
2. There are two types of this T-shaped birth control method: the progestin based version, which lasts five years and the hormone-free version which lasts ten years. Which birth control device is this?

Answer: The IUD

The IUD (Intra-Uterine Device) is a plastic T-shaped device that fits into the uterus, and prevents fertilization. The IUD acquired a bad reputation in the 1980s when some accused it of causing longer lasting infertility. But it is now believed that the initial study and report were flawed and that it does not hurt fertility.
3. Originally introduced outside of the U.S. in 1983, Nexaplon was endorsed by the World Health Organization, and is what kind of method of birth control?

Answer: Implant

Nexaplanon is a newer version of the implant, replacing Implanon. It is a rod the size of a matchstick and is implanted in the upper arm. It is unseen, and releases progestin steadily and slowly, lasting for three years. It is removed by a doctor making a small incision. The newer Nexplanon was developed to prevent the problem of too deep an implantation that occasionally happened with Implanon.
4. Levonorgestrel is more commonly known as what type of birth control method?

Answer: Morning after pill

Under the brand names Plan B One-Step and Next Choice, levonorgestrel is a "morning after pill" that works by delaying or stopping ovulation. Although it has been called such, it is not an abortion pill. If the pill is taken after the fertilized egg has implanted in the uterine wall, then the pill will not work at all. The pill is generally taken within five days after unprotected sex, but the sooner it is taken the more effective it will be in preventing an unwanted pregnancy.
5. The patch works like the pill and it is recommended that a woman stick it on her stomach or another part of the body. Which area is NOT a suitable location?

Answer: Ankles

The transdermal patch (Xulane replaced Ortho Evra in the U.S.) is a square bandage that is applied to either the belly, rump, upper arm, or back. And in Canada, the U.K. and other countries Evra is the patch that is used. A woman puts it on and leaves it for three weeks in a row.

After the third week of wearing the patch every day, the woman skips a week to have her period. Some fear that it can cause blood clots and, while all estrogen-based birth control methods carry a small risk of that, the patch may double that risk. That is probably because it has an increased exposure to estrogen than the pill. Doctors point out that the risk of a blood clot from these birth control methods is less than the risk of a clot during pregnancy.
6. If used properly, the pill is said to be how effective?

Answer: 99.7%

The pill contains estrogen and progestin, hormones that will act to suppress ovulation. The combination has also been known to clear up acne and reduce the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome. There have been notions put forth that the pill can be responsible for weight gain or decreased sexual libido but doctors say that it isn't so; those "side effects" are due to lifestyle changes that tend to coincide with the decision to go on the pill. Weight tends to go up for when starting college or a new job, for instance. And a lowered libido probably simply coincides with the sex drive naturally slowing down when a relationship progresses.
7. The minipill contains a lower dose of progestin, causing the cervical mucus to thicken, preventing pregnancy. Comparing progestin to estrogen, which of these statements is true?

Answer: Progestin does not decrease breast milk supply, unlike estrogen

The minipill is safer for women to take when they can't take estrogen for reasons such as being prone to blood clots or because a woman is nursing. A little bit of the progestin does get into the breast milk, but doctors say it has not been shown to have an effect on the baby. And because the minipill is of such a low-dose it must be taken at the precise same time every day for it to work effectively.
8. The NuvaRing, or vaginal ring, contains estrogen and progestin. It is a small flexible ring which is inserted into the vagina and left there for how long?

Answer: 3 weeks

One of the side benefits, like the pill, is that the ring can help clear acne. Putting the ring in is similar to inserting a tampon. The ring is typically about 91% effective. The risk of blood clots is about the same as the pill. If it should slip out, a woman is still protected if she can replace it within three hours.
9. With the sterilization method of birth control, which part of the female body is blocked to prevent fertilization of an egg?

Answer: Fallopian tubes

This method, also called "tubal ligation", may be done by cutting the fallopian tubes, instead of blocking them. Doctors can now perform this procedure without making an incision, via the cervix. After the tube is inserted, scar tissue forms blocking the fallopian tubes. If a woman changes her mind and decides she wants to have children, reversing the procedure is possible but difficult and expensive.
10. Which of these statements about condoms is true?

Answer: Earliest evidence of condom usage is from a 15,000 year old cave painting in France

According to "Johnny Come Lately: A Short History of the Condom" (1985) by Jeannette Parisot, researchers claim the French Grotte Des Combarelles caves depict ancient men wearing condoms. Of the wrong answers, Zimbabwe is among the most condom-using countries in the world.

In 2014, Zimbabweans used over 109 million condoms, the highest condom usage in the world. Female condoms are also especially popular there. A latex allergy is no excuse not to wear a condom; there are latex-free condoms made of polyurethane and polyisoprene.

When it comes to protection from HIV, condoms make sex 10,000 times safer then not using one.
Source: Author Billkozy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor rossian before going online.
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