Quiz about Luna Nostrum
Quiz about Luna Nostrum

Luna Nostrum Trivia Quiz


You see it in our sky every day, but what do you *really* know about our moon?

A multiple-choice quiz by reedy. Estimated time: 4 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Science Trivia
  6. »
  7. Our Solar System
  8. »
  9. Moons

Author
reedy
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
370,704
Updated
Dec 30 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
582
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Autrement (7/10), Guest 69 (3/10), Grogg07181951 (6/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. The Moon is Earth's only natural satellite, but in comparison with the planet it orbits, our Moon is the largest (proportionally) in the Solar System. Of these other large moons out there, which one is bigger than ours? Hint

Titania (Uranus III)
Europa (Jupiter II)
Titan (Saturn VI)
Triton (Neptune I)

2. Our moon is locked into a synchronous rotation with the Earth, meaning that it rotates on its own axis in the same amount of time as it takes to orbit around the planet (so the same side always faces Earth). What is the Moon's orbital (and rotational) period? Hint

31.194736 days
25.476828 days
27.321582 days
29.530589 days

3. The orbital period of the moon is slightly different than the synodic period, which relates to the Moon's position relative to the Sun as seen from Earth (the phases of the moon). Measuring from new moon to new moon, how long is the Moon's synodic period? Hint

25.476828 days
31.194736 days
27.321582 days
29.530589 days

4. The gravitational pull of the Moon (and, to a lesser extent, the Sun) causes the rise and fall of the oceans known as high and low tides. What is it called when both the Sun and the Moon combine their pull for a higher-than-normal tide? Hint

A summer tide
A winter tide
An autumn tide
A spring tide

5. The observation of the Moon from the Earth has been ongoing for millennia, but one of the first works ("Sidereus Nuncius") that described the Moon through telescopic observation was published in 1610 by which famed Italian astronomer and scientist? Hint

Christiaan Huygens
Johannes Kepler
Galileo Galilei
John Bainbridge

6. Does the Moon have an atmosphere?

Yes
No

7. Named for the Greek goddess of the Moon, what is the study of the surface and physical features of the Moon called? Hint

Selenography
Athenography
Hestiography
Aphroditography

8. Located within the Oceanus Procellarum (the largest of the Maria) is the brightest feature on the Moon's surface - an impact crater named for the Ancient Greek astronomer who first came up with a heliocentric model of the Solar System. What was his name? Hint

Aristarchus
Socrates
Aristotle
Plato

9. Mons Huygens, the largest mountain on the Moon, can be found in Montes Archimedes, the range of mountains found at the northern edge of Mare Imbrium.

True
False

10. On the far side of the Moon, right near the center, a crater exists that is the proposed site of a giant radio telescope that would be shielded from all radio transmissions from the Earth. Named for the builder of the Labyrinth in Greek mythology, whose son flew too close to the sun, what is the crater called? Hint

Midas
Minos
Icarus
Daedalus


(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The Moon is Earth's only natural satellite, but in comparison with the planet it orbits, our Moon is the largest (proportionally) in the Solar System. Of these other large moons out there, which one is bigger than ours?

Answer: Titan (Saturn VI)

The Moon's diameter is 3,475 km (2,159 miles), making it the fifth largest natural satellite in the Solar System. That means (of course) that there are only four moons in the Solar System that have a larger diameter than our moon. They are:

#1 - Ganymede (Jupiter III) - 5,270 km (3,275 miles);
#2 - Titan (Saturn VI) - 5,152 km (3,201 miles);
#3 - Callisto (Jupiter IV) - 4,821 km (2,996 miles); and
#4 - Io (Jupiter I) - 3,636 km (2,259 miles).

Where do Europa, Triton and Titania sit on the list?

#6 - Europa (Jupiter II) - 3,160 km (1,964 miles);
#7 - Triton (Neptune I) - 2,700 km (1,678 miles); and
#8 - Titania (Uranus III) - 1,578 km (981 miles).
2. Our moon is locked into a synchronous rotation with the Earth, meaning that it rotates on its own axis in the same amount of time as it takes to orbit around the planet (so the same side always faces Earth). What is the Moon's orbital (and rotational) period?

Answer: 27.321582 days

To break it down, 27.321582 days is equal to 27 days, 7 hours, 43 minutes and 6 seconds.

The orbit and rotation of the moon gave birth to the phrase 'the dark side of the moon' - it's the far side of the Moon that is always facing away from the Earth. It's not actually dark (except when we have a full moon) - it's just that it remained unknown to us until we could send a spacecraft to orbit the moon.
3. The orbital period of the moon is slightly different than the synodic period, which relates to the Moon's position relative to the Sun as seen from Earth (the phases of the moon). Measuring from new moon to new moon, how long is the Moon's synodic period?

Answer: 29.530589 days

The synodic period of the Moon has figured much more prominently in history than its orbital period. The cycle of the moon has marked the passage of time and the seasons, has figured in various religions, and has been the source of signs and portents of various kinds.

The phases of the moon are:

1. New moon
2. Waxing crescent (right side of moon begins to reflect the Sun's light)
3. First quarter (or half moon - light on right half of moon)
4. Waxing gibbous
5. Full moon
6. Waning gibbous
7. Third quarter (or half moon - light on left half of moon)
8. Waning crescent
9. New moon
4. The gravitational pull of the Moon (and, to a lesser extent, the Sun) causes the rise and fall of the oceans known as high and low tides. What is it called when both the Sun and the Moon combine their pull for a higher-than-normal tide?

Answer: A spring tide

When the Moon and the Sun line up together, around the time of a new or a full moon, the larger tide effect is referred to as a 'spring tide'. When the Moon and the Sun are at 90 degrees to each other in relation to the Earth, the Sun has a bit of a negating effect on the Moon's effect, causing a lower-than-normal tide called a 'neap tide'.

Interestingly, when the moon's gravity pulls on the Earth's oceans, a similar 'bulge' happens on the opposite side of the globe. You can visualize it like squeezing an orange.
5. The observation of the Moon from the Earth has been ongoing for millennia, but one of the first works ("Sidereus Nuncius") that described the Moon through telescopic observation was published in 1610 by which famed Italian astronomer and scientist?

Answer: Galileo Galilei

Galileo's observations in the year 1609 were the first to prove that the Moon was more than just a smooth ball. He was able to determine the presence of craters and mountains by observing the terminator (the line separating day and night) and seeing irregularities instead of a simple, smooth line. He was even able to determine the (rough) height of some of the mountains.

Galileo lived from 1564 to 1642.
6. Does the Moon have an atmosphere?

Answer: Yes

For a long time, everyone took it for granted that the Moon had no atmosphere and, when compared to other similar bodies in the Solar System, it has a very small amount of air. But it DOES have (a very negligible) atmosphere.

Argon, helium, sodium, potassium, and hydrogen have been detected to a level of roughly 80,000 atoms per cubic centimetre.
7. Named for the Greek goddess of the Moon, what is the study of the surface and physical features of the Moon called?

Answer: Selenography

Selenography as a science has been greatly improved since the advent of spaceflight, as you might imagine. Before, the study of the Moon was limited to what could be observed from Earth, thus also limiting selenography to the visible half of the Moon.

Most of the Moon has been mapped, with most significant features bearing names, although there are still areas of the Moon that do not have accurate measurements of depths or heights yet (mostly around the polar regions).
8. Located within the Oceanus Procellarum (the largest of the Maria) is the brightest feature on the Moon's surface - an impact crater named for the Ancient Greek astronomer who first came up with a heliocentric model of the Solar System. What was his name?

Answer: Aristarchus

Aristarchus of Samos lived between 310 and 230 BC and made a few other suppositions in his heliocentric model. He correctly placed the (known) planets in their proper positional order from the Sun, and he also surmised that the stars in the sky were also suns in their own accord.

The Aristarchus crater is located at 23.7N, 47.4W and is approximately 40 km (24.9 miles) in diameter, and extends 3.7 km (2.3 miles) down.
9. Mons Huygens, the largest mountain on the Moon, can be found in Montes Archimedes, the range of mountains found at the northern edge of Mare Imbrium.

Answer: False

Mons Huygens (5,500 m high - 18,045 feet), named for Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695), can be found in the Montes Apenninus, a range which also skirts the edge of Mare Imbrium (to the southeast). Its coordinates are 20.0N, 2.9W. Montes Apenninus were named for the Apennine mountains of Italy.

Oddly enough, although Mons Huygens is the tallest mountain, it is not the highest point on the Moon. That belongs to an area that isn't qualified as a mountain, even though the elevation is 10,786 m (35,387 feet) above the mean radius. The 'slope' leading up to the point is only at a 3% grade.

Montes Archimedes, named for the Ancient Greek astronomer and scientist, is also located in the region of Mare Imbrium on a plateau on the eastern side.
10. On the far side of the Moon, right near the center, a crater exists that is the proposed site of a giant radio telescope that would be shielded from all radio transmissions from the Earth. Named for the builder of the Labyrinth in Greek mythology, whose son flew too close to the sun, what is the crater called?

Answer: Daedalus

Daedalus' coordinates are 5.9S, 179.4E. It has a diameter of 93 km (58 miles) and a depth of 3 km (1.9 miles). The crater was prominently featured in photographs taken by Apollo 11's Michael Collins in the command module Columbia while Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were on the Moon.
Source: Author reedy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor rossian before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Most Recent Scores
Mar 10 2023 : Autrement: 7/10
Feb 27 2023 : Guest 69: 3/10
Feb 16 2023 : Grogg07181951: 6/10
Feb 13 2023 : Guest 184: 5/10
Feb 08 2023 : dennisbn: 2/10
Jan 26 2023 : mazza47: 10/10
Jan 24 2023 : Guest 109: 7/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series Look to the Heavens:

Moons, moons, more moons, some dwarf planets, 'real' planets, and a few stars. Have fun!

  1. Luna Nostrum Average
  2. The Moon Rocks Average
  3. Where Can We See The Moon? Easier
  4. It's Your Planet Easier
  5. Fear and Dread Average
  6. The Galilean Moons Average
  7. Titans and Giants Average
  8. The Moons of Neptune Average
  9. Our Dwarf Planets Average
  10. Celestial Order Average
  11. The Sun Will Come Out Tomorrow Average
  12. Starlight Star Bright Average

3/23/2023, Copyright 2023 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us