Quiz about Romantic Relationships
Quiz about Romantic Relationships

Romantic Relationships Trivia Quiz


I'm currently studying A-Level Psychology. Here is a quiz on the psychology behind romantic relationships.

A multiple-choice quiz by Purling. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Purling
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
365,541
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
267
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Who suggested that romantic relationships form because two people are similar, or become similar, in personality and attitudes? Hint

Thibaut and Kelley (1959)
Byrne, Clore and Smeaton (1986)
Walster et al. (1978)
Duck (1999)

2. According to Thibaut and Kelley's Social Exchange Theory (1959), the comparison level is our experiences of previous relationships and our general views of what we might expect from a particular exchange in a relationship.

True
False

3. A type of sexual selection that suggests that members of one sex (usually the males) will compete with each other to gain access to the other sex is called inter-sexual selection.

True
False

4. The first stage of Rollie and Duck's model of dissolution, which shows the process of relationship breakdown, is called what? Hint

Dyadic process
Grave-dressing process
Social process
Intrapsychic process

5. Duck (1999) suggested that there were three main reasons for relationship breakdown. They included lack of skills, lack of stimulation, and what? Hint

Maintenance Difficulties
Sexual Boredom
Proximity Problems
Partner Distrust

6. According to Shaver et al., what we experience in romantic relationships as an adult is a combination of three behavioural systems - Mother System, Toddler System, and Leadership System.

True
False

7. A study by Dekel and Farber (2013) suggested that many individuals who were classed as having 'insecure-avoidant' attachment showed over-commitment in a relationship and were overconfident in its success.

True
False

8. Most Western cultures can be described as individualistic.

True
False

9. What did Myers et al. (2005) find when they studied individuals living in India in arranged marriages? Hint

There was a significant increase in the satisfaction found in a relationship compared to ones in the USA
The relationship with their parents after the arranged marriage was severly damaged
There was a significant decrease in the satisfaction found in a relationship compared to ones in the USA
There was no difference in the satisfation found in a relationship compared to ones in the USA

10. According to Moghaddam, individualistic relationships are pressured to stay together. They regard divorce as shameful.

True
False


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Who suggested that romantic relationships form because two people are similar, or become similar, in personality and attitudes?

Answer: Byrne, Clore and Smeaton (1986)

Byrne, Clore and Smeaton suggested that an individual will first sort through all potential partners, narrowing down the list of partners by avoiding those too dissimilar. Then they will sort through who is remaining and choose the individual who is most similar in personality and attitudes.

Research has also suggested that a process of 'attitude alignment' occurs, with partners modifying their own attitudes to become even more similar to their partner.
2. According to Thibaut and Kelley's Social Exchange Theory (1959), the comparison level is our experiences of previous relationships and our general views of what we might expect from a particular exchange in a relationship.

Answer: True

In the Social Exchange Theory, we judge a current relationship using our comparison level to see if the relationship is considered worthwhile maintaining. If the relationship requires investment costs more (e.g. in time or money) than they are gaining, it may be considered lower than the comparison level, and the relationship will not be maintained.

However, if the rewards of the relationship outweigh the costs of maintaining it, the relationship will continue.
3. A type of sexual selection that suggests that members of one sex (usually the males) will compete with each other to gain access to the other sex is called inter-sexual selection.

Answer: False

The correct answer is intra-sexual selection.

The victor of the competition wins access to the member of the other sex, allowing them to mate with them, and pass on their genes through natural selection. The loser will not be able to mate, and therefore cannot pass on their genes to the next generation. This leads the characteristics that helped the victor to win the competition to be passed down to the next generation, helping them win their competitions to gain access to a mate. For example, male peacocks compete with each other to have the brightest tail feathers, and attract the females.
4. The first stage of Rollie and Duck's model of dissolution, which shows the process of relationship breakdown, is called what?

Answer: Intrapsychic process

During a relationship breakdown, the intrapsychic process occurs when they reflect on the deficiencies of the relationship, perhaps using costs and benefits, but will not outwardly say that they are unhappy to their partner. The second phase is called the Dyadic process, where they confront their partner with their problems, usually resulting in an argument with both sides refusing to take responsibility for the problem. Up till this point the relationship can be saved. If it isn't saved, the next step is the Social process, where they tell their friends and family through their social networking.

After this, the Grave-dressing process is when they will attempt to justify their role in the breakdown of the relationship in order to portray themselves in a positive light, allowing them to appear loyal and trustworthy to a new partner. Finally, the Resurrection process allows the individual to recreate their own social values and define what they would get out of a new relationship, reflecting what they have learnt about themselves and others.
5. Duck (1999) suggested that there were three main reasons for relationship breakdown. They included lack of skills, lack of stimulation, and what?

Answer: Maintenance Difficulties

Duck said that if there was a lack of skills, there is a lack of interpersonal skills to make the relationship mutually satisfying, causing the relationship to fail before it really gets going.

Lack of stimulation is another reason why a relationship might fail. Stimulation is considered a reward within a relationship, and if the relationship is not considered rewarding, it is unlikely to continue. If the relationship doesn't develop or change in some way, one or both of the individuals will become bored of the relationship, causing it to fail.

Finally, maintenance difficulties occur when the relationship is strained because the individuals do not see each other, perhaps due a job or going to university. A limitation of this explanation is that it does not explain why many long-distance relationships succeed.
6. According to Shaver et al., what we experience in romantic relationships as an adult is a combination of three behavioural systems - Mother System, Toddler System, and Leadership System.

Answer: False

The three systems are the Attachment System, Caregiver System and Sexuality System.

Bowlby's concept of the internal working model within the attachment system suggests that the attachment formed by a baby to the primary caregiver will form the basis to all relationships (friendship, professional and romantic) in adulthood. In extreme cases, the internal working model could lead to the development of an attachment disorder, which has been linked to abuse and neglect in childhood.

The caregiving system is the knowledge about how one cares for another, and is learnt by modelling the behaviour of their primary attachment figure through social learning theory.

The sexuality system is learned in relation to early attachment and shows how the view of having sex is reflected in their childhood attachment. For example, individuals who suffered from insecure avoidant attachment are more likely to view sex without love pleasurable.
7. A study by Dekel and Farber (2013) suggested that many individuals who were classed as having 'insecure-avoidant' attachment showed over-commitment in a relationship and were overconfident in its success.

Answer: False

The study actually showed that those who were classified as having an insecure avoidant attachment showed anxiety about intimacy and reluctance to share with their partner, as well as reporting less personal satisfaction in their relationships than those who were determined to have a secure relationship.

This does not necessarily suggest that those who are not securely attached as children will not succeed in relationships.
8. Most Western cultures can be described as individualistic.

Answer: True

Because individualistic cultures tend to focus on the personal gain of the individual, their relationships tend to have an emphasis on the freedom of choice for their relationships. They can choose who they want to form a relationship with (partly because there is high social and geographic mobility, so they interact with large amounts of people), and if they are not happy about the relationship, because they receive too many costs against the rewards, they choose to leave.
9. What did Myers et al. (2005) find when they studied individuals living in India in arranged marriages?

Answer: There was no difference in the satisfation found in a relationship compared to ones in the USA

In many non-Western, collectivist cultures, arranged marriages are common. They base their relationships on the concerns of the family, and are far more willing to marry in the absence of love (Levine, 1995). Also, because they have less social and geographical mobility than Western cultures, their interactions with potential partners are more limited, and are therefore described as non-voluntary relationships.

Myers et al's study suggested that non-Western, non-voluntary relationships experience similar satisfaction of their relationships as voluntary relationships. This opposes the Western view that only voluntary relationships work.
10. According to Moghaddam, individualistic relationships are pressured to stay together. They regard divorce as shameful.

Answer: False

It is actually collectivist cultures that are pressured to maintain their relationships and regard divorce as shameful. Compare this to Western relationships who hold the view that if they are not happy with their relationship, they leave. This automatically means that their divorce rates are significantly higher.

Therefore, collectivist relationships tend to be considered more permanent than Western cultures.
Source: Author Purling

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