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Quiz about Dramatic Medicine
Quiz about Dramatic Medicine

Dramatic Medicine Trivia Quiz


This quiz is all about TV medical dramas. Some key plot points of shows are revealed. Enter at your own risk and enjoy!

A multiple-choice quiz by kaddarsgirl. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
kaddarsgirl
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
362,454
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
2985
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 96 (0/10), Guest 47 (6/10), Guest 73 (6/10).
Question 1 of 10
1. September 1994 marked the premiere of one of television's longest running and most beloved medical dramas. Created by Michael Crichton, "ER" ran for fifteen seasons and focused on the lives of emergency medical physicians in their work and personal relationships. In which fictional hospital was the show "ER" based? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Hugh Laurie took to the world of television medicine in 2004's "House, M.D." as the title character Dr. Gregory House. He and his staff worked at the fictional Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital based in New Jersey. House and his team of physicians worked tirelessly to solve a wide variety of medical mysteries. His caustic demeanor and god-complex made him a difficult man to work for and to work with, though his medical genius made him an asset the hospital couldn't live without. Of which department was Dr. House the chief? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Showtime took a different spin with its medical drama, focusing on the lives of the nurses in a hospital instead of the lives of the doctors. "Nurse Jackie" premiered in 2009, starring Edie Falco in role of the title character of Nurse Jackie Peyton. She worked in New York City's All Saints' Hospital in the emergency department and struggled balancing her personal life and her work life. What addiction did Jackie feed into to help her cope with her life? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. "M*A*S*H" was a popular medical drama that ran on television from 1972 until 1983, running longer than the war in which the story took place. The show followed the lives of the surgeons, nurses, and regular army at the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital. The popular television show followed the movie "MASH" (1970) which starred a young Donald Sutherland as the brilliant, but irreverent, surgeon, Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce. During which war were both the movie and the television show based? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. At Seattle Grace Hospital in Seattle, Washington, drama abounded among and around the many surgeons that staffed the halls. In 2005, ABC premiered a new medical drama that followed five young surgical interns in their first year as new doctors. As the series continued, the interns became residents, and then attending physicians. What is the name of this drama, that starred such actors as Ellen Pompeo, Sandra Oh, and Patrick Dempsey? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Dr. Douglas Howser was a teenage surgeon at the fictional Eastman Medical Center in Los Angeles, California. His years as a surgical resident were seen in the medical drama "Doogie Howser, M.D.", which premiered in 1989 and ran for four seasons. Doogie was a genius, who survived pediatric leukemia as a young child and decided to go medical school. He was made a doctor at the young age of 14. Which American actor, also famous for his starring role on the television show "How I Met Your Mother", played Dr. Doogie Howser as a teenager? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Chicago, Illinois, was the subject of not one, but two, medical dramas in the 1990s. "Chicago Hope", based in a fictional private charity hospital of the same name, suffered severely in network ratings when it debuted, showing on the same night as the Chicago drama "ER", and only aired for six seasons. Unlike rival show "ER" which was purely American drama, "Chicago Hope" was shown in the style of a soap-opera. Thomas Gibson, of "Criminal Minds" and "Dharma & Greg" fame, landed his first major recurring television role on "Chicago Hope" when it premiered in 1994. What was the name of his character on the show, who was an ER physician and trauma surgeon? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. In 2009, TNT released a new medical drama, "HawthoRNe", to audiences across the United States. The show followed the work and personal life of the title character Nurse Christina Hawthorne, portrayed by Jada Pinkett Smith. Hawthorne's best friend was Nurse Bobbie Jackson, played by Suleka Mathew, and she was one of the few people with whom Hawthorne could be completely open. What medical "condition" defined Nurse Jackson's life on the show? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. "Combat Hospital" was a British and Canadian medical drama that lasted for only one season in 2011. It focused on the lives of military doctors and nurses in conflict in 2006. Members of the military camp were mainly from the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, and Australia. The cast of characters also included a civilian neurosurgeon played by Luke Mably, and a civilian interpreter played by Hamza Jeetooa. In which country was "Combat Hospital" based? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Mark Feuerstein took to the small screen and New York's Hamptons in 2009, starring as Dr. Henry "Hank" Lawson in USA's new medical drama "Royal Pains". In the series, people of the Hamptons were reluctant to seek medical advice from a hospital, but were very open to having a physician who was willing to treat them in their homes. Dr. Lawson, with the aid of his brother, Evan, began a concierge medicine business in the Hamptons to treat patients in the convenience of their own homes. Hank had recently left a prominent hospital position in New York before working in the Hamptons. What was the reason that Dr. Lawson left his hospital position, which led him to become a concierge doctor? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. September 1994 marked the premiere of one of television's longest running and most beloved medical dramas. Created by Michael Crichton, "ER" ran for fifteen seasons and focused on the lives of emergency medical physicians in their work and personal relationships. In which fictional hospital was the show "ER" based?

Answer: Cook County General Hospital

The emergency room in "ER" was located in Cook County General Hospital, in Chicago, Illinois. The pilot, which aired one day after the premiere of rival show "Chicago Hope", was filmed in the real-life former Linda Vista Hospital in Los Angeles, California.

The doctors and nurses of "ER" were portrayed by some of television and movies' most recognizable actors, including ER Physician Mark Greene (Anthony Edwards), Pediatrician Doug Ross (George Clooney), ER Physician Tony Gates (John Stamos) and Nurse Carol Hathaway (Julianna Margulies). Hundreds of patients passed through the Chicago hospital's ER doors throughout the course of the show's fifteen seasons, many of whom were also played by famous actors of the big and small screens.
2. Hugh Laurie took to the world of television medicine in 2004's "House, M.D." as the title character Dr. Gregory House. He and his staff worked at the fictional Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital based in New Jersey. House and his team of physicians worked tirelessly to solve a wide variety of medical mysteries. His caustic demeanor and god-complex made him a difficult man to work for and to work with, though his medical genius made him an asset the hospital couldn't live without. Of which department was Dr. House the chief?

Answer: Diagnostics

FOX's dramatic medical series "House, M.D." debuted in 2004 and ran for eight seasons. Chief of Diagnostics, Dr. Gregory House, and his team of diagnosticians and surgeons solved hundreds of medical mysteries and saved countless lives of patients at Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital. Hugh Laurie's performance as the title character earned him six Primetime Emmy nominations during the course of the show.

The character of Dr. House was based on the famed fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, from his investigative style to his drug addiction. Hugh Laurie made his dramatic exit from television medicine in true Sherlock Holmes fashion in the show's finale, when Dr. House faked his own death.
3. Showtime took a different spin with its medical drama, focusing on the lives of the nurses in a hospital instead of the lives of the doctors. "Nurse Jackie" premiered in 2009, starring Edie Falco in role of the title character of Nurse Jackie Peyton. She worked in New York City's All Saints' Hospital in the emergency department and struggled balancing her personal life and her work life. What addiction did Jackie feed into to help her cope with her life?

Answer: Drugs

In the "Nurse Jackie" pilot episode Jackie was already addicted to prescription pain medication. It was not explained when or why she started taking painkillers, but her addiction, and her struggle to become sober were central not only to Jackie's life, but to the lives of her family as well. Nurse Jackie's relationship with her husband, Kevin, was always strained, but fell completely apart when it was made known to Kevin that Jackie was trading sexual favors with All Saints' pharmacist, Eddie, for prescription drugs. Jackie's relationship with her daughter was also strained, and in Season 5, her daughter, Grace, was discovered snorting drugs with her boyfriend, following in Jackie's footsteps.
4. "M*A*S*H" was a popular medical drama that ran on television from 1972 until 1983, running longer than the war in which the story took place. The show followed the lives of the surgeons, nurses, and regular army at the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital. The popular television show followed the movie "MASH" (1970) which starred a young Donald Sutherland as the brilliant, but irreverent, surgeon, Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce. During which war were both the movie and the television show based?

Answer: The Korean War

The Korean War lasted from 1950 until 1953. During the war, the United States aided the South Koreans, and mobile medical units were establish around the country to treat wounded soldiers and civilians. The television show "M*A*S*H" was set during this conflict and struck an almost perfect balance between the tragedy of war and the comedic antics of the young doctors, headed by Chief Surgeon Hawkeye (Alan Alda), at the 4077th MASH unit.

In fact, during the first season of the show, all of the surgeries performed on the show were blood-less, as it was thought to be too gory for television (the conflict with Vietnam was still going on). Following seasons tried to bring more realism back to the surgeries and blood was introduced.
5. At Seattle Grace Hospital in Seattle, Washington, drama abounded among and around the many surgeons that staffed the halls. In 2005, ABC premiered a new medical drama that followed five young surgical interns in their first year as new doctors. As the series continued, the interns became residents, and then attending physicians. What is the name of this drama, that starred such actors as Ellen Pompeo, Sandra Oh, and Patrick Dempsey?

Answer: Grey's Anatomy

Dr. Meredith Grey (Ellen Pompeo), Dr. Cristina Yang (Sandra Oh), and Dr. Derek "McDreamy" Shepherd (Patrick Dempsey) are three of the main characters in the medical drama "Grey's Anatomy". In the pilot episode, Drs. Grey and Yang, and three other new medical school graduates began their intern year in the surgical department at Seattle Grace Hospital. Over the course of the series, doctors came and went; there were weddings and divorces, births and deaths.

The name of the hospital also changed during the series from Seattle Grace Hospital to Seattle Grace Mercy West Hospital (after Mercy West closed and staff merged) to Grey Sloan Memorial Hospital (after Meredith's sister Dr. Lexie Grey, and Derek's best friend Dr. Mark Sloan, died as the result of a plane crash at the end of Season 8).
6. Dr. Douglas Howser was a teenage surgeon at the fictional Eastman Medical Center in Los Angeles, California. His years as a surgical resident were seen in the medical drama "Doogie Howser, M.D.", which premiered in 1989 and ran for four seasons. Doogie was a genius, who survived pediatric leukemia as a young child and decided to go medical school. He was made a doctor at the young age of 14. Which American actor, also famous for his starring role on the television show "How I Met Your Mother", played Dr. Doogie Howser as a teenager?

Answer: Neil Patrick Harris

Neil Patrick Harris was just 16 years old when he landed the title role of Dr. Douglas Howser in ABC's "Doogie Howser, M.D." in 1989. On the show, Doogie Howser had to deal with a lot of things that most teenagers do not have to worry about. He tried, unsuccessfully, several times to move out of his parents' house and live on his own, and he often found it difficult to balance his work with his personal life. Outside of his job at the hospital, Doogie often spent the little time he had with his best friend, Vinnie, and his girlfriend, Wanda.

In 1992, Neil Patrick Harris made a guest performance as the teenage Dr. Doogie Howser on an episode of "Roseanne", appearing in one of Roseanne's dreams while she was at a hospital for surgery. Harris also appeared in an Old Spice commercial in 2008, spoofing his childhood role as "a doctor for pretend".
7. Chicago, Illinois, was the subject of not one, but two, medical dramas in the 1990s. "Chicago Hope", based in a fictional private charity hospital of the same name, suffered severely in network ratings when it debuted, showing on the same night as the Chicago drama "ER", and only aired for six seasons. Unlike rival show "ER" which was purely American drama, "Chicago Hope" was shown in the style of a soap-opera. Thomas Gibson, of "Criminal Minds" and "Dharma & Greg" fame, landed his first major recurring television role on "Chicago Hope" when it premiered in 1994. What was the name of his character on the show, who was an ER physician and trauma surgeon?

Answer: Dr. Daniel Nyland

CBS's "Chicago Hope" was created by David E. Kelley in 1994. It struggled against NBC's "ER" and changed Primetime time slots several times in the hopes for better ratings. Dr. Daniel Nyland (Thomas Gibson) was an ER physician and trauma surgeon on the series for the first three seasons. During the series, Gibson's character was suspended for sleeping with the family member of a patient. Several of the show's other physicians were played by prominent actors, including Mandy Patinkin (Dr. Jeffrey Geiger), who went on to star in "Dead Like Me", "Criminal Minds", and "Homeland", Mark Harmon (Dr. Jack McNeil) of "NCIS" fame, and Hector Elizondo (Dr. Phillip Watters) of "Monk", "Last Man Standing", and the popular "The Princess Diaries" movies.
8. In 2009, TNT released a new medical drama, "HawthoRNe", to audiences across the United States. The show followed the work and personal life of the title character Nurse Christina Hawthorne, portrayed by Jada Pinkett Smith. Hawthorne's best friend was Nurse Bobbie Jackson, played by Suleka Mathew, and she was one of the few people with whom Hawthorne could be completely open. What medical "condition" defined Nurse Jackson's life on the show?

Answer: Amputation

Nurse Bobbie Jackson had one of her legs amputated before the start of Season 1 and worked with a prosthetic limb. It was never clearly mentioned in the show how she lost her leg, but it gave her a unique perspective when it came to patients who needed amputations of their own.

Although most television medical dramas airing at around the same time focused mostly on the lives of doctors, "HawthoRNe" took a different approach by focusing on the nurses of a hospital instead. There was one physician, who appeared in all thirty episodes of the show, Chief of Surgery Dr. Tom Wakefield (Michael Vartan), with whom Nurse Hawthorne became romantically involved, and eventually married.
9. "Combat Hospital" was a British and Canadian medical drama that lasted for only one season in 2011. It focused on the lives of military doctors and nurses in conflict in 2006. Members of the military camp were mainly from the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, and Australia. The cast of characters also included a civilian neurosurgeon played by Luke Mably, and a civilian interpreter played by Hamza Jeetooa. In which country was "Combat Hospital" based?

Answer: Afghanistan

"Combat Hospital" took place in Afghanistan during the war supported by the United Nations. The series began by introducing two physicians, Maj. Rebecca Gordon (Michelle Borth) and Capt. Bobby Trang who had just arrived at the combat hospital. The fictional television hospital was modeled after a real-life war zone military hospital in Afghanistan.

The show only ran for a single season of 13 episodes, and showed a more modern (21st Century) military medical camp than could be seen in "M*A*S*H" (1970s/80s), an earlier war-time medical drama. "Combat Hospital" was much more intense than its predecessor and lacked the comedic relief that made "M*A*S*H" so popular for so many years.
10. Mark Feuerstein took to the small screen and New York's Hamptons in 2009, starring as Dr. Henry "Hank" Lawson in USA's new medical drama "Royal Pains". In the series, people of the Hamptons were reluctant to seek medical advice from a hospital, but were very open to having a physician who was willing to treat them in their homes. Dr. Lawson, with the aid of his brother, Evan, began a concierge medicine business in the Hamptons to treat patients in the convenience of their own homes. Hank had recently left a prominent hospital position in New York before working in the Hamptons. What was the reason that Dr. Lawson left his hospital position, which led him to become a concierge doctor?

Answer: Medical malpractice

Dr. Henry Lawson was fired from his hospital position for medical malpractice. He had done his job, saving the life of an injured basketball player in the emergency room, but in the process, another of his patients, an elderly hospital trustee, had died of unforeseen complications.

The New York hospital had viewed this as unacceptable practice and fired Dr. Lawson citing medical malpractice. To take his mind off the loss of his job, Hank's brother Evan (Paulo Costanzo) convinced him to take a short vacation in the Hamptons.

While in the Hamptons, they saw that Dr. Lawson could fill a much-needed position as a concierge doctor, and started their new business, "HankMed". Evan worked as HankMed's Chief Financial Officer, with Hank as its concierge doctor.

They soon hired Divya Katdare (Reshma Shetty) as Hank's Physician's Assistant, and the series followed the three of them as they cured dozens of medical maladies.
Source: Author kaddarsgirl

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor kyleisalive before going online.
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