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Quiz about Hangover
Quiz about Hangover

Hangover Trivia Quiz


'Share the wine at my table...' Wine, beer and other alcoholic drinks have been around for thousands of years, and this quiz looks at rituals and beliefs involving alcohol in different countries.

A multiple-choice quiz by Kankurette. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
Kankurette
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
399,436
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
313
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: PurpleComet (7/10), Guest 73 (7/10), jazh2 (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. In which country is it customary for couples to share a cup of sake at weddings, in a ceremony called 'san san kudo'? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. At which Jewish festival is it customary to drink until one can no longer see the difference between 'cursing Haman and blessing Mordechai'? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. In many countries, it is customary to wish people good health and raise one's glass before drinking, a custom known as a 'toast'. Which country would you toast someone with 'iechyd da'? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In South Korea, when pouring or receiving a drink, how should you hold your glass or bottle? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. What do the countries of Sudan, Saudi Arabia, Libya and Kuwait have in common regarding alcohol? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. When toasting someone in the Czech Republic, what must you NOT do when raising your glass? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. In which South American country would you find miners offering alcohol to a spirit known as 'El Tio'? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Jenever is a type of gin made in the Netherlands. What is the traditional way to drink jenever there? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. True or false: in Spain, there is a festival called the Batalla del Vino, which involves having a food fight - but with wine.


Question 10 of 10
10. In Australia, there is a particularly gruesome drinking ritual called a 'shoey'. What does a shoey involve? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Mar 24 2024 : PurpleComet: 7/10
Mar 21 2024 : Guest 73: 7/10
Mar 03 2024 : jazh2: 7/10

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In which country is it customary for couples to share a cup of sake at weddings, in a ceremony called 'san san kudo'?

Answer: Japan

At Japanese weddings, sake is traditionally served in a ceremonial cup called a sakazuki. 'San san kudo' literally means 'three three nine times' and involves the bridal couple, and sometimes their parents as well, taking three sips each from three sakazuki stacked on top of each other.

The reason why three is a symbolic and lucky number is because it cannot be divided in two. The number three is also said to represent the heavens, the earth and humanity; love, wisdom and happiness, three qualities of a marriage that should grow over time; or three human flaws, hatred, passion and ignorance.
2. At which Jewish festival is it customary to drink until one can no longer see the difference between 'cursing Haman and blessing Mordechai'?

Answer: Purim

Even rabbis and religious Jews drink on Purim; while you're not exactly supposed to get paralytic, drinking is sanctioned. The custom comes from a Talmudic quote attributed to Rava, a 4th century rabbi, about not being able to tell the difference between blessing Mordechai, Queen Esther's uncle, and cursing Haman, the villain of the story behind Purim. Opinion is divided over how much alcohol should be drunk, however.

It is also customary for Jews to dress up and listen to the reading of the megillah, the Book of Esther.

Some communities give baskets of sweets to children.
3. In many countries, it is customary to wish people good health and raise one's glass before drinking, a custom known as a 'toast'. Which country would you toast someone with 'iechyd da'?

Answer: Wales

A fuller version is 'iechyd da chi', or 'good health to you'. You'd say 'skl' in Iceland, 'tchim-tchim' or 'sade' in Portugal and 'egszsgnkre' in Hungary. Other phrases used to toast people's health around the world include 'prost' (Germany), 'kampai' (Japan), 'skl' (Sweden and Norway), 'l'chaim' (Israel, and Jewish ceremonies in general), and 'slinte' (Ireland). Toasts can be proposed at weddings, birthdays, funerals, or any special occasion.
4. In South Korea, when pouring or receiving a drink, how should you hold your glass or bottle?

Answer: With both hands - glass in right hand, left hand under bottom of glass/bottle

The traditionally polite way to hold your glass or bottle in South Korea is to hold it with both hands; the container should be in your right hand and your left hand should be holding up the bottom. If you hold your glass or bottle in one hand while receiving or pouring a drink, it is considered to be a sign of arrogance.

It is also polite to serve your elders first, and to turn your back to your elders while drinking. Like Japan, South Korea has its own rice wine, called 'soju'.
5. What do the countries of Sudan, Saudi Arabia, Libya and Kuwait have in common regarding alcohol?

Answer: It is banned as a rule

All of the above countries are Muslim countries, and bringing alcohol into these countries is a very bad idea as it could easily get you arrested and even deported. The manufacture of alcohol is banned, as is consumption for Muslim citizens, and tourists are advised to be extremely careful.

However, there is some leeway for non-Muslim citizens and foreign visitors in Somalia and Sudan; they can drink alcohol in private. Alcohol in Islam is considered to be haraam, or forbidden, as it is an intoxicant, though some sects of Islam allow consumption of non-grape-based alcoholic drinks.

In the English Premier League, Muslim footballers who are awarded Man of the Match can opt for non-alcoholic drinks instead of the traditional champagne.
6. When toasting someone in the Czech Republic, what must you NOT do when raising your glass?

Answer: Spill any of your drink

'Na zdravy' is the phrase to use when toasting someone in the Czech Republic, a country with a reputation for producing some of the world's best beers and lagers. If you're ordering beer there, expect there to be lots of foam on top of your drink. You must toast every single person in your party - only for the first drink of the night, however - and maintain eye contact at all times (which is also customary in Scandinavia), and must not spill so much as a drop of your drink or cross arms with another person. According to Czech folklore, if you break any of the drinking rules, expect seven years of bad sex!
7. In which South American country would you find miners offering alcohol to a spirit known as 'El Tio'?

Answer: Bolivia

'El To' literally means 'the uncle' and he is a spirit who is believed to be the Lord of the Underworld, who protects the silver miners of Cerro Rico in Bolivia. Statues of El To can be found dotted around the mines and miners leave him offerings of cigarettes, alcohol and coca leaves to keep him happy.

Another local custom involves sacrificing a llama and smearing its blood on the mine entrances. During the Carnival of Oruro, a once-indigenous festival that later took on Christian elements, statues of El To are paraded around to commemorate his defeat by St Michael.
8. Jenever is a type of gin made in the Netherlands. What is the traditional way to drink jenever there?

Answer: Bending down and drinking it from the glass, without taking the glass off the table

Jeneve, also known as Dutch gin, is a drink made and consumed in the Netherlands, as well as Belgium and certain parts of northern France and Germany; only from these regions is the liqueur recognised as 'jenever'. It is named after the juniper berries which flavour it and its introduction to England led to a craze for gin. Delft, Amsterdam, Schiedam and Groningen are all major Dutch producers of jenever.

This being the Netherlands, it is traditionally served in a glass shaped like the country's national flower, the tulip, and when drinking it, the drinker must bend over and sip from the glass without picking it up.
9. True or false: in Spain, there is a festival called the Batalla del Vino, which involves having a food fight - but with wine.

Answer: True

Yes, the Batalla del Vino is a real thing! You might have heard of La Tomatina, the Spanish tomato festival that involves a food fight, but in the winemaking region of La Rioja, locals put on white clothes and red neckerchiefs, gather in the Riscos de Bilibio hills, outside the town of Haro, and throw wine over each other until their clothes turn purple.

The festival is held on 29th June and celebrates San Juan, San Felices de Bilibio (the local saint) and San Pedro. The wine fight ends at midday and festival goers lunch on snails and lamb chops afterwards.

The custom is thought to have originated from a local custom of using wine for baptism.
10. In Australia, there is a particularly gruesome drinking ritual called a 'shoey'. What does a shoey involve?

Answer: Drinking alcohol out of a shoe

A 'shoey' involves drinking alcohol out of a shoe, and has been done by various Australian athletes as a victory celebration, such as motorcycle racer Jack Miller and Formula One driver Daniel Ricciardo. The drinker can either drink out of their own shoe or use a mate's shoe.

In fairness to Australia, it's not the only country that does this; in Ukraine, for instance, one wedding customer involves drinking out of the bride's shoe. There is also a type of German beer glass shaped like a boot called a 'Bierstiefel' (literally: 'beer boot'), based on a story about a Prussian general who claimed he would drink beer out of his boot if his troops won a war, but chickened out and had a glass boot made instead.
Source: Author Kankurette

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor stedman before going online.
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