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Quiz about Skyscrapers of New York City
Quiz about Skyscrapers of New York City

Skyscrapers of New York City Trivia Quiz


Although New York City did not invent the skyscraper (which is actually a nautical term), it did master the art. See how much you know about New York's skyscrapers!

A multiple-choice quiz by DonTozzi. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
DonTozzi
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
369,814
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
316
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Question 1 of 10
1. Which of the following is NOT true about the Empire State Building? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Who is the architect who designed or helped design the American Radiator Building (later becoming the American Standard Building), the Daily News Building, parts of the Rockefeller Center and the McGraw-Hill Building? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Upon its completion in 1903, the Flatiron Building was the tallest structure north of the Wall Street area. It was 21 stories tall and looked like, well, a flatiron. But what else was this early skyscraper's appearance compared to? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Although the Twin Towers are irreplaceable, the subsequent One World Trade Center finally "topped out", as construction workers say, in 2012. How tall is this newer skyscraper? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Completed in 1929, this building held the title of the tallest skyscraper in Manhattan for only two years, until it was eclipsed by the Empire State Building. Which skyscraper am I talking about? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The Chrysler Building began as a speculative venture by William H. Reynolds. He proposed the design, complete with stainless steel eagle heads and hubcaps, to Walter Chrysler, who accepted the plan. What other place had William Reynolds previously designed that makes his "resume" a bit surprising? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. When it was completed in 1913, the Woolworth Building was the tallest in the world, until it was surpassed by the Chrysler Building in 1929. Like most skyscrapers, the planning and construction of this "cathedral of commerce" required enormous funding. What was unusual about the financing of the Woolworth Building's construction? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Not all New York skyscrapers are restricted to the island of Manhattan. This 512 foot beauty is located on 1 Hansen Place in Brooklyn. Which building am I referring to? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. In the lobby of the Woolworth Building, several gargoyle-like creatures are crammed alongside the ceiling and elevators. Most of them are representations of the people involved in the skyscraper's creation. What is the gargoyle representing Frank W. Woolworth doing? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Which noted architect complained that the skyscrapers of New York City were "too small"? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Which of the following is NOT true about the Empire State Building?

Answer: An average of four people per year have jumped off of it

Since its opening in 1931, over 30 people have attempted suicide by jumping from the Empire State Building. Most of these attempts were successful (although two people actually survived!) This is, however, nowhere near four people per year. We New Yorkers are neurotic but not THAT BAD.
2. Who is the architect who designed or helped design the American Radiator Building (later becoming the American Standard Building), the Daily News Building, parts of the Rockefeller Center and the McGraw-Hill Building?

Answer: Raymond Hood

Raymond Hood was a brilliant innovator of color and style. Probably only he could have convinced the American Radiator Board of Directors to build a black and gold skyscraper.
3. Upon its completion in 1903, the Flatiron Building was the tallest structure north of the Wall Street area. It was 21 stories tall and looked like, well, a flatiron. But what else was this early skyscraper's appearance compared to?

Answer: The bow of an enormous ship

If you're standing just north of the building, it appears that it is going to plow right at you, like a ship in the ocean. This effect was remarked upon by several architecture critics of the time.
4. Although the Twin Towers are irreplaceable, the subsequent One World Trade Center finally "topped out", as construction workers say, in 2012. How tall is this newer skyscraper?

Answer: 1,776 feet

Initially known as "The Freedom Tower", its height is meant to evoke the independence that came to America in the year 1776.
5. Completed in 1929, this building held the title of the tallest skyscraper in Manhattan for only two years, until it was eclipsed by the Empire State Building. Which skyscraper am I talking about?

Answer: The Chrysler Building

Walter Chrysler must have been very upset by the brief span his building held its title. Still, the Chrysler Building is gorgeous and he should be very proud of his legacy in New York City.
6. The Chrysler Building began as a speculative venture by William H. Reynolds. He proposed the design, complete with stainless steel eagle heads and hubcaps, to Walter Chrysler, who accepted the plan. What other place had William Reynolds previously designed that makes his "resume" a bit surprising?

Answer: Dreamland in Coney Island

Considering that, in the 1920s, skyscrapers were meant to dazzle and awe the average citizen, maybe it is not surprising that Reynolds' plan would appeal to Chrysler. Even in the 21st Century, the Chrysler Building is a delight to the eye, and as dazzling as any Coney Island attraction.
7. When it was completed in 1913, the Woolworth Building was the tallest in the world, until it was surpassed by the Chrysler Building in 1929. Like most skyscrapers, the planning and construction of this "cathedral of commerce" required enormous funding. What was unusual about the financing of the Woolworth Building's construction?

Answer: There was no mortgage, financing or loan required; Mr. Woolworth paid for everything in cash

F.W. Woolworth had amassed a fortune from his five-and-ten-cent stores. Just imagine all the nickels and dimes that went into that beautiful Gothic skyscraper!
8. Not all New York skyscrapers are restricted to the island of Manhattan. This 512 foot beauty is located on 1 Hansen Place in Brooklyn. Which building am I referring to?

Answer: The Williamsburgh Savings Bank Tower

Known for its exquisite clock and unusual combination of Romanesque and Byzantine elements, the Williamsburgh Savings Bank Tower is unnecessarily overlooked by tourists and native New Yorkers alike.
9. In the lobby of the Woolworth Building, several gargoyle-like creatures are crammed alongside the ceiling and elevators. Most of them are representations of the people involved in the skyscraper's creation. What is the gargoyle representing Frank W. Woolworth doing?

Answer: Counting out coins

F.W. Woolworth financed the "cathedral of commerce" in cash from the nickels and dimes his customers paid for his goods. Those nickels and dimes had to be counted by someone!
10. Which noted architect complained that the skyscrapers of New York City were "too small"?

Answer: Le Corbusier

This statement has been interpreted and represented in different ways by different people. However, make no doubt about it, Le Corbusier believed in BIGNESS. He conceived of superskycrapers existing in superblocks. He wanted entire buildings, streets, avenues and blocks cleared away for BIG BIG and BIGGER buildings. As if traffic wasn't bad enough!
Source: Author DonTozzi

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor stedman before going online.
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