Quiz about With A Spirit Born To Run
Quiz about With A Spirit Born To Run

With A Spirit Born To Run Trivia Quiz


Athletics are considered one of the oldest organised sporting events in history. In this quiz we'll focus on one of its branches, competitive running, and the biggest names associated to it. On your marks, get set, and GO!

A multiple-choice quiz by Gispepfu. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
Gispepfu
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
410,082
Updated
Sep 17 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
177
Last 3 plays: Guest 98 (7/10), flwrchyld (7/10), rupert774 (8/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Before becoming a neurologist, this Englishman was a middle-distance athlete who, after failing to win a medal at the 1952 Olympics, made history by being the first to break the four-minute mile, two years later. Who was he? Hint

John Landy
Roger Bannister
John Walker
Steve Scott

2. The USA Track and Field award for the year's best athlete is named after this man, who is mostly famous for winning four gold medals at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. Hint

James LuValle
Jesse Owens
Ralph Metcalfe
Mack Robinson

3. Africa seems to produce lots of great marathonists, particularly Kenya and Ethiopia. The Olympic Marathon often has men or women (or both) from those countries in the podium. Which of the following gold medalists is NOT from any of those countries? Hint

Eliud Kipchoge
Waldemar Cierpinski
Abebe Bikila
Mamo Wolde

4. Impossible is nothing, they say. At the 1952 Summer Olympics, this man decided, at the last minute, to run his first marathon ever-- and won it. Nicknamed "The Czech Locomotive", who was this hard-training athlete? Hint

Zdenek Rygel
Stanislav Lusk
Emil Zatopek
Ondrej Nepela

5. When she was only 5 years old, she contracted polio and lost strength in her left leg, but this didn't stop her -- 15 years later, in 1960, she won the 100m and 200m sprints, as well as the 4 x 100 relay, becoming the first American woman to win three gold medals in a single edition of the Olympic games. Who was she? Hint

Martha Hudson
Barbara Jones
Lucinda Williams
Wilma Rudolph

6. This English woman had a fruitful career in long distance running. She won the London and New York Marathons three time each, as well as the Chicago Marathon, and has also been a multiple World and European champion in several disciplines. She was named the Female World Athlete of the Year in 2002. Who is she? Hint

Allyson Felix
Sanya Richards
Paula Radcliffe
Gwen Torrence

7. This "Flying Finn" dominated the early 20th century and is ranked among the best athletes of all time. He introduced the "even pace" strategy, and systematic training regimes, inspiring and influencing more people to take on running throughout the years. Can you name him? Hint

Ville Ritola
Paavo Nurmi
Lauri Lehtinen
Ilmari Salminen

8. Jamaica has a very strong presence in sprinting competitions, with one of their most known athletes being this multiple medalist and record breaker, nicknamed "Lightning". Who is he? Hint

Usain Bolt
Carl Lewis
Tyson Gay
Ben Johnson

9. The year 2022 marked the 90th anniversary of the first Olympic marathon winner from South America: Juan Carlos Zabala, from Argentina. Do you remember where did those games take place?

Answer: (Think about movies!)
10. Despite not setting any records for time or distance, Kathrine Switzer's 1967 performance was ground-breaking. Even though one of the officials tried to pull her out mid-race, she was the first woman to officially compete in (and complete) this famous North American Marathon, which had its first edition back in 1897. Hint

Chicago
Los Angeles
New York
Boston


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Before becoming a neurologist, this Englishman was a middle-distance athlete who, after failing to win a medal at the 1952 Olympics, made history by being the first to break the four-minute mile, two years later. Who was he?

Answer: Roger Bannister

Although he had established a new British record in the 1500 m final in 1952, he finished in fourth place, therefore not earning a medal. He briefly considered quitting running altogether, but soon resolved to make up for it by setting to be the first person to run a mile in under 4 minutes, which he eventually accomplished, on May 6th, 1954.
2. The USA Track and Field award for the year's best athlete is named after this man, who is mostly famous for winning four gold medals at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin.

Answer: Jesse Owens

Considering that those games were held during the Nazi regime in Germany, and Hitler had hopes that German athletes would dominate the events, such a victory by Owens, an African American athlete, is still seen as legendary. A year before, at the Big Ten Track and Field Championship, Jesse also wrote a big page in history, as he broke three world records and equalled another, all in the space of 45 minutes.
3. Africa seems to produce lots of great marathonists, particularly Kenya and Ethiopia. The Olympic Marathon often has men or women (or both) from those countries in the podium. Which of the following gold medalists is NOT from any of those countries?

Answer: Waldemar Cierpinski

Cierpinsky won two gold medals representing East Germany. Bikila (ETH) and Kipchoge (KEN) achieved that same feat as well. Wolde (ETH) won gold in 1968 and bronze in 1972.
4. Impossible is nothing, they say. At the 1952 Summer Olympics, this man decided, at the last minute, to run his first marathon ever-- and won it. Nicknamed "The Czech Locomotive", who was this hard-training athlete?

Answer: Emil Zatopek

Often considered among the best long distance runners of all time, Zatopek frequently underwent heavy training routines to improve his skills, such as running under extreme weather or wearing work boots. Zatopek also became the first person to win the 5,000 m, 10,000 m, and the marathon, at the same Olympic Games.
5. When she was only 5 years old, she contracted polio and lost strength in her left leg, but this didn't stop her -- 15 years later, in 1960, she won the 100m and 200m sprints, as well as the 4 x 100 relay, becoming the first American woman to win three gold medals in a single edition of the Olympic games. Who was she?

Answer: Wilma Rudolph

A great example of what willpower can achieve. Wilma suffered many illnesses in her childhood, aside from polio. Through a long and difficult treatment, she overcame her ailings and became a star athlete in the '60s. She also played basketball in her teen years, also with quite some success. The three wrong options were her teammates in the "golden relay" at the 1960 Olympics.
6. This English woman had a fruitful career in long distance running. She won the London and New York Marathons three time each, as well as the Chicago Marathon, and has also been a multiple World and European champion in several disciplines. She was named the Female World Athlete of the Year in 2002. Who is she?

Answer: Paula Radcliffe

Paula started racing when she was 12 years old. Her career spanned around 30 years, with her final race being the 2015 edition of the London Marathon.
Although she took part in four Olympic games, she never managed to win any medals.
7. This "Flying Finn" dominated the early 20th century and is ranked among the best athletes of all time. He introduced the "even pace" strategy, and systematic training regimes, inspiring and influencing more people to take on running throughout the years. Can you name him?

Answer: Paavo Nurmi

Inspired by another great Finnish runner, Hannes Kohlemainem, Nurmi began training hard at the age of 15, and debuted at the 1920 Olympics. During his career, he broke 22 world records, and had a streak of 121 consecutive races from 800m upwards without being beaten.

He also set the record for most Olympic medals won by a single athlete (12 in total), and also for most gold medals (9) all of which were won in three different editions.
8. Jamaica has a very strong presence in sprinting competitions, with one of their most known athletes being this multiple medalist and record breaker, nicknamed "Lightning". Who is he?

Answer: Usain Bolt

Even if you're not an avid athletics follower, you surely must have heard about Bolt. Widely considered the greatest sprinter of all time, he has won Olympic gold medals in the 100m and 200m in three consecutive editions. In 2009, he set a record for 100m in 9.58 seconds, and for 200m in 19.19 sec.
9. The year 2022 marked the 90th anniversary of the first Olympic marathon winner from South America: Juan Carlos Zabala, from Argentina. Do you remember where did those games take place?

Answer: Los Angeles

Nicknamed "El Ņandu Criollo", Zabala became the first Olympic Marathon winner from North or South America, other than the USA. In 1948, fellow Argentinian Delfo Cabrera took home a second Marathon gold medal for the country. The start and finish of the marathon was at the LA Memorial Coliseum.
10. Despite not setting any records for time or distance, Kathrine Switzer's 1967 performance was ground-breaking. Even though one of the officials tried to pull her out mid-race, she was the first woman to officially compete in (and complete) this famous North American Marathon, which had its first edition back in 1897.

Answer: Boston

Back in those days, women weren't allowed to compete in the race, although there wasn't actually a rule saying so. In 1966, Bobbi Gibb tried to enter the marathon but was rejected, and she ran it unofficially by jumping into the crowd as it began. Inspired by this, Switzer decided to enter as an official competitor. Registering with her initials, and "disguising" herself with a hood at the starting line, she was able to participate.

But a few miles into the competition, John "Jock" Semple, one of the race officials, after noticing her, jumped off the press vehicle and tried to stop Switzer, until he was knocked down by her boyfriend, who was running with her. Switzer managed to finish the Marathon and was the first woman in doing so officially. The AAU, following this event, formally barred women from entering the competition, but in 1972, an official competition for women was established.
Source: Author Gispepfu

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor gtho4 before going online.
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