Quiz about All I Want for Christmas Are Some Anagrams
Quiz about All I Want for Christmas Are Some Anagrams

All I Want for Christmas Are Some Anagrams Quiz


It's Christmastime in Quizzyland! Share in the celebration! Rearrange the anagrammed words in ALL CAPS for words and phrases related to holiday festivities.

A photo quiz by gracious1. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
gracious1
Time
5 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
395,579
Updated
Dec 16 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
9 / 10
Plays
620
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 174 (7/10), fun61 (7/10), ret0003 (10/10).
photo quiz
1. It's time to decorate the CHASTER MISTER with tinsel, garland, baubles, and a string of lights.

Answer: (two words; one is a proper noun)
2. I'm not sure, but I think that the questionably edible FAUCET IRK that someone in my family gives every year is the same one that has been passed around for years.

Answer: (one word or two words)
photo quiz
photo quiz
3. The modern-day Santa Claus can trace his roots to CLANNISH IOTAS, a holy man who was born in the third century. In some countries, the gift-giving is on his day (Dec. 6) rather than on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day.

Answer: (two words, NO ABBREVIATIONS; first word is a title)
4. We went to see a traditional Christmas presentation of 'The NECTAR RUCK', a ballet performed by our local dance troupe -- with music of course by Tchaikovsky.

Answer: (one word, no "the")
photo quiz
photo quiz
5. Red was the dominant color in our Christmas decorations, especially because we used lots of showy scarlet PIANIST TOE flowering plants.

Answer: (one word; be careful of the spelling!!!)
6. We went around the neighborhood, door-to-door singing LARCH OSTRACISMS in four-part harmony. "We wish you a Merry Christmas...".

Answer: (two words; one is a proper noun)
photo quiz
photo quiz
7. On my front door I hung a Christmas THAWER made of holly and ivy and berries, and adorned with ribbons and baubles and pine cones.

Answer: (One Word)
8. We went to a midnight worship service on Christmas Eve and stood up as we listened to the choir sing the famous "RASCAL JELLO UH-HUH" in that oratorio by Handel.

(There is no hyphen in the answer.)

Answer: (two words; watch your spelling!)
photo quiz
photo quiz
9. After opening our presents on Christmas morning, my frugal grandmother insisted we save all the colorful GRAPE PRAWN PIP to use for next year's presents. (But when she wasn't looking we put it in the recycling bin.)

Answer: (two words)
10. Lacking a fireplace, we played a video of a crackling LO GLUEY with Christmas music on the television while we ate Christmas dinner and made merry.

(It's also the name of a Christmas cake, but I am talking about the real thing.)

Answer: (two words; first word is sometimes capitalized)
photo quiz

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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. It's time to decorate the CHASTER MISTER with tinsel, garland, baubles, and a string of lights.

Answer: Christmas tree

According to Illinois University, the first decorated Christmas tree was in Riga, Latvia in 1510, but the first printed reference to Christmas trees was in 1531, in what is now Germany. In the past, hawthorns and cherry trees were used as Christmas trees as well the expected conifers. Edward Johnson, assistant to Thomas Edison, thought of creating electric lights for Christmas trees in 1882. Mass production of Christmas-tree lights began in 1890 and eventually replaced the candles that had been used since the 17th century.
2. I'm not sure, but I think that the questionably edible FAUCET IRK that someone in my family gives every year is the same one that has been passed around for years.

Answer: fruitcake

Fruitcake dates back to Ancient Roman times (as I am pretty sure does the one that keeps appearing under our tree). When the Romans mixed barley mash, pomegranate seeds, pine nuts, and honeyed wine, they called it 'satura'. Luckily (?) a well-made fruitcake can last a quarter of a century and still be eaten, or so says the 'Christian Science Monitor'.

The 'New York Times', however, went one step further and in 1974 claimed that columnist Russell Baker had in his possession a fruitcake that had originally been a gift for President George Washington. (They may have been joking.)
3. The modern-day Santa Claus can trace his roots to CLANNISH IOTAS, a holy man who was born in the third century. In some countries, the gift-giving is on his day (Dec. 6) rather than on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day.

Answer: Saint Nicholas

Nicholas was born in Patara in 270 CE and served as Bishop of Myra, both seaport towns off modern-day Turkey's southern coast, where he lived all his life (and died on December 6, 343). Nicholas began his anonymous gift-giving in Patara when he threw three bags of gold into a poor family's window on three consecutive nights. This act of charity became an annual tradition that spread throughout Europe.

The Middle Dutch 'Sinter Niklaas' gave way to 'Sante Klaas' among the Dutch who settled in colonial America, which eventually became "Santa Claus" in American English. (In Modern Dutch he is 'Sint-Nicolaas' or 'Sinterklaas').
4. We went to see a traditional Christmas presentation of 'The NECTAR RUCK', a ballet performed by our local dance troupe -- with music of course by Tchaikovsky.

Answer: Nutcracker

When 'The Nutcracker' was originally performed in St. Petersburg in the nineteenth century, it was not a success; but Tchaikovsky's 'Nutcracker Suite', a 20-minute extract from the ballet, was! In the mid-20th century, the 85-minute ballet grew popular, and it has become an ubiquitous Christmas staple in North America.

Some popular dances include the "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" and the "Coffee Dance", better known as the "Arabian Dance". The tinkly sound of the Sugar Plum Fairy dance comes from the celesta, an instrument proudly discovered by Tchaikovsky in Paris.
5. Red was the dominant color in our Christmas decorations, especially because we used lots of showy scarlet PIANIST TOE flowering plants.

Answer: poinsettia

The poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) is named after J. R. Poinsett (1799-1851), U.S. minister to Mexico, who encountered the plant there in 1828. Poinsett brought this colorful plant back to his Greenville, S.C plantation, where he cultivated it. He gave poinsettias out as gifts to friends. Grown primarily in Mexico and in Central America, the poinsettia actually has yellow petals, but it also has ostentatious leaflike parts resembling petals called bracts that are the familiar and rich scarlet color that is associated with Christmas.

There is a Mexican legend of an impoverished little girl who had nothing to bring to church for Christmas, so she picked some plants by the side of the road. As she entered the church, the leaves at the tips of the branches turned into bright, brilliant red flowers -- poinsettias!
6. We went around the neighborhood, door-to-door singing LARCH OSTRACISMS in four-part harmony. "We wish you a Merry Christmas...".

Answer: Christmas carols

A "carol" originally was a non-religious, outdoor circular dance, accompanied by singing. Eventually, the meaning flipped to a merry tune that one could dance to. The word "carol" acquired the specific meaning "Christmas song of joy" apparently in the 16th century. "To go carolling", meaning to go from place to place in a group singing Christmas carols, first came into usage in the 1870s, when it was said to be a revival of an old English custom.
7. On my front door I hung a Christmas THAWER made of holly and ivy and berries, and adorned with ribbons and baubles and pine cones.

Answer: wreath

Wreaths of evergreens hung as decoration in the Christmas season to represent eternal life have been around since the early days of Christianity. Some churches have a hanging-of-the-greens ceremony when they decorate for Christmas.

Some Christians have in their homes an Advent wreath, which sits horizontally on a table, usually with four candles (one pink and three violet), one lit for each of four Sundays of Advent (the liturgical period preceding Christmas). The Advent wreath originated among 16th-century German Lutherans, but Evangelical minister Johann Hinrich Wichern (1808-1881) established the modern form, which was eventually adopted by Catholics and other denominations in Germany in the 1920s. The custom reached the USA in the 1930s. In the UK, four red candles are commonly used instead of the pink and violet.
8. We went to a midnight worship service on Christmas Eve and stood up as we listened to the choir sing the famous "RASCAL JELLO UH-HUH" in that oratorio by Handel. (There is no hyphen in the answer.)

Answer: Hallelujah Chorus

The tradition of standing during the "Hallelujah Chorus" began with King George II of England, who was so moved when he first heard this portion of the 'Messiah' oratorio, composed by George Fredric Handel in 1741, that he rose to his feet. Or at least that is the legend; the evidence is that His Majesty never actually attended the London premiere of 'Messiah'. However, the oratorio was so popular that when it premiered in Dublin, ladies were asked to leave their hoopskirts at home so that more people could fit into the auditorium.
9. After opening our presents on Christmas morning, my frugal grandmother insisted we save all the colorful GRAPE PRAWN PIP to use for next year's presents. (But when she wasn't looking we put it in the recycling bin.)

Answer: wrapping paper

The trouble with saving gift wrap is that it is manufactured with the intent of being used only once, and with each subsequent use it becomes more worn and difficult to save. Unfortunately, in the USA about 4 million tons (3.6 metric tonnes) of it ends up in the dump and accounts for about 4/5 of the extra waste during the Christmas season. Up until the early 1900s, brown paper was used by most people for wrapping presents, but then colorful wrapping paper called "gift dressing" started becoming the norm, usually red, white, or green tissue paper. (Of course, the wealthy had long before used decorative paper on their gifts.)
10. Lacking a fireplace, we played a video of a crackling LO GLUEY with Christmas music on the television while we ate Christmas dinner and made merry. (It's also the name of a Christmas cake, but I am talking about the real thing.)

Answer: yule log

The yule log is a large log of wood traditionally used as the foundation of a fire in the hearth at Christmastime. (It has its roots in a Nordic custom that dates from antiquity and was brought to the British Isles by Vikings.)

The first televised yule log was created by Fred M. Thrower, president of WPIX-TV in New York City, and broadcast in 1966. It was filmed at Gracie Mansion, the residence of the mayor of New York City. When producers removed the fire grate to better capture the flame on camera, a stray spark damaged an antique rug! Many other local TV stations in the USA since then have televised their own yule log. In the 2010s, however, the practice began to grow less common. Ccustomers of cable-TV, however, could still easily get one as video-on-demand, and eventually streaming services like Netflix began offering videos of yule logs and other holiday ambient videos, too.

There is also a Christmas dessert called a yule log, essentially sponge cake covered with a creamy filling, and then rolled up and decorated to look like a real yule log. It's also called the bche de Nol (French) and other names in various countries.
Source: Author gracious1

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