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Quiz about The Witching Hour
Quiz about The Witching Hour

The Witching Hour Trivia Quiz


In folklore, the witching hour is a time during the night when witches, ghosts, and demons are at their most powerful. In honour of this theme, and in the spirit of Halloween, this quiz concerns spooky and supernatural creatures from legend.

A multiple-choice quiz by agentofchaos. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
agentofchaos
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
399,252
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
590
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 172 (5/10), Guest 104 (6/10), Guest 82 (8/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. The idea of witches and sorcerers trafficking with the powers of darkness dates back thousands of years. In an ancient Roman legend, Pompey the Great's son, Sextus Pompeius, seeks out a notorious witch named Erichtho to learn the outcome of an upcoming battle through the power of necromancy. What on earth did this involve? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. In the popular imagination, witches are often depicted as hideous old hags. This is not a new idea. In Slavic folklore, there are tales of an ogress who appears to be a deformed old woman with a long nose who rides through the air in a mortar while wielding a pestle. She is known by what name? (Oddly enough, this is also a nickname of John Wick in the films of the same name.) Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Mandrake, the root of the mandragora plant, has a spooky reputation! It has long been associated with witchcraft and was said to be used in magic potions. According to ancient legends, one had to be careful when digging it up, as what dangerous thing would happen? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Perhaps, the ultimate creature of the night is the vampire. Although legends of blood-sucking supernatural beings go back thousands of years, the idea of a vampire as a human who has risen from the dead is only a few centuries old, and originated in what region's folklore? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The Tower of London is associated with many ghost stories, hardly surprising considering how many people have been executed there over the centuries. In 1864, a soldier guarding the Tower fainted after confronting a headless ghost, believed to be what tragic woman? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Nineteenth century London was terrorized for over 60 years by a mysterious figure who was said to be able to make prodigious leaps from the street to the rooftops, and to appear out of nowhere to accost people and vanish equally mysteriously. By what name was this enigmatic assailant known? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Stories about malevolent creatures invading people's homes and harassing the occupants appear around the world and are often associated with things that "go bump in the night." In traditional English folklore, what is the name of one kind of malevolent household spirit that causes all sorts of mischief from making milk go sour to much more sinister things like abducting children? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Stories about headless horseman can be found in many parts of the world. In some versions, he carried his head around, while in others he rides around looking for it. Perhaps the most famous version is "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" by Washington Irving. However, a headless horseman also appears in what 14th century English poem? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. During the medieval witch trials, some people were not only accused of being witches but were also accused of being werewolves. Amazingly, some people actually voluntarily confessed to being werewolves! Nowadays, the belief that one can turn oneself into an animal is considered a rare but actual psychiatric disorder, which goes by what name that is the same as the mythical process of becoming a werewolf? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. A quiz on creepy supernatural creatures would hardly be complete without mentioning zombies, undead corpses reanimated through black magic. Zombies have become ubiquitous in modern pop culture. From which modern country, associated with Voodoo, did the word zombie derive? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The idea of witches and sorcerers trafficking with the powers of darkness dates back thousands of years. In an ancient Roman legend, Pompey the Great's son, Sextus Pompeius, seeks out a notorious witch named Erichtho to learn the outcome of an upcoming battle through the power of necromancy. What on earth did this involve?

Answer: Raising a corpse from the dead so that it could speak about the future

Erichtho instructed Sextus to find a corpse on a battlefield, which she then filled with rather creepy magic potions to summon its spirit from the underworld and restore the body to temporary life, so she could ask it questions. (For some reason, the dead were supposed to have special insight into the future that the living don't.) In later times, the term necromancy came to refer to any attempt to communicate with the dead, whether or not a corpse was involved, and sometimes was even more broadly applied to the practice of black arts in general. Sacrificing a sheep or another animal and inspecting its entrails was actually performed by Roman priests to obtain oracles from the gods.
2. In the popular imagination, witches are often depicted as hideous old hags. This is not a new idea. In Slavic folklore, there are tales of an ogress who appears to be a deformed old woman with a long nose who rides through the air in a mortar while wielding a pestle. She is known by what name? (Oddly enough, this is also a nickname of John Wick in the films of the same name.)

Answer: Baba Yaga

In traditional stories, Baba Yaga is said to live in the forest in a hut mounted on chicken legs that continually spins around. She is quite enigmatic and may either help or hinder those who seek her out, and often threatens to eat people who annoy her!
3. Mandrake, the root of the mandragora plant, has a spooky reputation! It has long been associated with witchcraft and was said to be used in magic potions. According to ancient legends, one had to be careful when digging it up, as what dangerous thing would happen?

Answer: The plant would scream upon being uprooted, killing whoever hears it

In some stories, a person would tie a dog to the mandrake and then run away. The dog would chase after them, but the plant's scream would kill the dog but not its master. Poor little Fido! Mandrake historically had a number of medical uses, although it is also potentially dangerous as ingesting it can cause delirium and hallucinations and may be fatal in large doses.
4. Perhaps, the ultimate creature of the night is the vampire. Although legends of blood-sucking supernatural beings go back thousands of years, the idea of a vampire as a human who has risen from the dead is only a few centuries old, and originated in what region's folklore?

Answer: Eastern European

The modern word "vampire" is believed to derive from the Serbian word "vampir." In eighteenth century Eastern Europe there was a rash of vampire sightings and alleged attacks, which led to people digging up graves and staking corpses in an attempt to destroy suspected vampires. Mass hysteria about vampires soon spread through the rest of Europe, which helped popularise the idea of a vampire as a revenant returned from the grave to prey upon the living.
5. The Tower of London is associated with many ghost stories, hardly surprising considering how many people have been executed there over the centuries. In 1864, a soldier guarding the Tower fainted after confronting a headless ghost, believed to be what tragic woman?

Answer: Anne Boleyn

Anne Boleyn was beheaded in the Tower by Henry VIII in 1536. The soldier who claimed to see her apparition was court-martialled for falling asleep on duty. However, several other guards apparently claimed that they too had seen Anne Boleyn's ghost, so the soldier was let off.
6. Nineteenth century London was terrorized for over 60 years by a mysterious figure who was said to be able to make prodigious leaps from the street to the rooftops, and to appear out of nowhere to accost people and vanish equally mysteriously. By what name was this enigmatic assailant known?

Answer: Spring-heeled Jack

According to eye-witness accounts, Spring-heeled Jack had glowing red eyes and spat blue flames from his mouth. There are reports of him attacking young girls, causing cab drivers to crash, and of him slapping soldiers on sentry duty with icy fingers before bounding away laughing. No-one has ever positively explained who or what Spring-heeled Jack was, but this has not stopped people from coming up with all manner of outlandish theories.
7. Stories about malevolent creatures invading people's homes and harassing the occupants appear around the world and are often associated with things that "go bump in the night." In traditional English folklore, what is the name of one kind of malevolent household spirit that causes all sorts of mischief from making milk go sour to much more sinister things like abducting children?

Answer: Boggart

Boggarts were said to be rather creepy as they would often crawl into people's beds and put their cold hands on the sleeper's face or pull off the bedsheets. The name boggart is related to the words "bogeyman" and bugbear." The Harry Potter books features creatures named boggarts who are shapeshifters that adopt the form of a person's worst fear, but this is not attested in traditional folklore.
8. Stories about headless horseman can be found in many parts of the world. In some versions, he carried his head around, while in others he rides around looking for it. Perhaps the most famous version is "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" by Washington Irving. However, a headless horseman also appears in what 14th century English poem?

Answer: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

In this tale, the gigantic Green Knight challenges King Arthur's knights to a strange contest. The challenger could strike him with an axe, but the Green Knight would return in a year and a day to return the favour. Sir Gawain accepts the challenge and cuts off the Green Knight's head with a single blow.

However, the Green Knight is unperturbed and picks up his head, telling Gawain he will see him in a year and a day! The story has a happy ending, as the Green Knight decides to spare Gawain after being impressed with his bravery and virtue.
9. During the medieval witch trials, some people were not only accused of being witches but were also accused of being werewolves. Amazingly, some people actually voluntarily confessed to being werewolves! Nowadays, the belief that one can turn oneself into an animal is considered a rare but actual psychiatric disorder, which goes by what name that is the same as the mythical process of becoming a werewolf?

Answer: Lycanthropy

In a witchcraft trial in 1692, an 80-year-old man claimed that he periodically became a werewolf and travelled to Hell to fight the witches and wizards of Satan. The court tried to coerce him into confessing to being in league with Satan, but he refused to do so, and was sentenced to whipping rather than execution. Nowadays, he would probably be diagnosed with a mental disorder instead. Wendigo psychosis and ghost sickness each refer to unusual kinds of mental illness that have been documented in Native American tribes. Munchausen syndrome is when a person pretends to be mentally or physical ill when they are not, perhaps to gain sympathy and attention.
10. A quiz on creepy supernatural creatures would hardly be complete without mentioning zombies, undead corpses reanimated through black magic. Zombies have become ubiquitous in modern pop culture. From which modern country, associated with Voodoo, did the word zombie derive?

Answer: Haiti

In Haitian folklore, a sorcerer could turn a dead person into a zombie to become his or her slave. In a book called "The Serpent and the Rainbow," anthropologist Wade Davis claimed that Haitian practitioners of black magic could actually turn a living person into a zombie-like condition by administering a powder containing powerful drugs that induce a temporary death-like state, so that the person could be buried and later "resurrected" and forced to work as a slave.

However, the scientific community has remained largely unconvinced by Davis' claims.
Source: Author agentofchaos

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor agony before going online.
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This quiz is part of series Commission #59:

Boo! For all things spooky, this quiz list takes in titles from the Author Lounge's 59th Commission, launched in October 2019, all of which had a certain quality.

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