FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about What About My Name
Quiz about What About My Name

What About My Name? Trivia Quiz


From names that might declare one's character to names that were first declared for the purpose of naming a character, here are another group of "guests" anxious to see if you know about their names.

A multiple-choice quiz by uglybird. Estimated time: 7 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. General Knowledge Trivia
  6. »
  7. Names

Author
uglybird
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
200,532
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
6376
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 108 (1/10), bookhound (7/10), ConnYankee (8/10).
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. The name "Emily" may conjure up images of sweet shyness. Perhaps this is a lingering effect of a character of the same name that Charles Dickens created for "David Copperfield", or perhaps the often placid yet lovely poetry of Emily Dickinson is partially responsible. But I assure you that my name's origin is not passive nor does it promise sweetness. Emily was the number one choice for baby girls' names in the US from 1997 to 2003 England for 2003 and 2004. The name's meaning is what the name "Emily" was without in those countries during those years. What would that be? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. One of the best known bearers of my name gained fame for his skepticism. In 2001 my name was number one for baby boys in France. In 2003 my name was number three in England and Wales. Don't doubt that you know my name. Which of the following is it? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Since my name means "universal", perhaps every woman should bear it! Perhaps someday every woman will; after all, in 2003 my name was the most popular name for newborn girls in Scotland, Ireland and Sweden. I was still number two in the US, but a certain "rival" had best watch out! What is my name? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. I am the MAN! No really. That's what my name means. My name didn't crack the top ten in the US until 1993, but the name has stayed there ever since. My namesake in the Bible had a brother named Peter. Which of the following names is mine? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. My parents named me after their favorite Welsh lake. My name is not so popular as a certain one meaning "green shoot" nor is it given to girls as often as the name taken from the longest river in Ireland. At least it doesn't double as an herb like a certain English name that refers to the sea. Which of the following names is mine? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. I was given my great great grandfather's first name, and I note with satisfaction that it became the number one name for baby boys in Scotland in 2004. It is the English spelling of a French name that was often taken by French Kings. Because this is a "fill in", I will give you two literary hints: "Jabberwocky" and Narnia. What is my name?

Answer: (Five letters)
Question 7 of 10
7. I love my first and middle name, but I admit it doesn't always fit my personae; you see it means "anointed flower of heaven". My first name is from my German grandmother and the middle from my Hawaiian grandmother. Can you pick my name out of the ones following? (Hint: look for the flower in the middle.) Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. My name is uniformly popular in many countries from Belgium and France to the British Isles and North America. In the US, my name jumped in popularity beginning in the 1970s. Some might speculate that a popular 1960's folk singer had something to do with this. My name is Welsh in origin and means "great sea". What is my name? (Hint: The answer is blowing in the wind!) Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. I hope you won't take offense, but I'm the original fair-haired boy. My name derives from a sixth century Irish Saint whose name literally meant "fair hair". But my name has been steadily declining in popularity; and because of the suspicions surrounding a certain American baseball player, it could become less popular still. What is my name? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Although there is doubt and debate about the exact number of words William Shakespeare coined (with estimates running as high as 2000), apparently my name was one of them. In "Twelfth Night" my namesake was described as a "most radiant, exquisite and unmatchable beauty". Another bearer of my name starred opposite John Travolta in the movie version of "Grease". For over forty years, my name has been steadily rising in popularity in the US where it reached fifth place for baby girls' names in 2003. What is my name? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Apr 21 2024 : Guest 108: 1/10
Apr 11 2024 : bookhound: 7/10
Apr 04 2024 : ConnYankee: 8/10
Mar 25 2024 : Guest 147: 8/10
Mar 21 2024 : Guest 152: 5/10
Mar 12 2024 : Guest 170: 4/10
Mar 07 2024 : Guest 92: 5/10
Mar 02 2024 : Guest 51: 7/10
Feb 28 2024 : Guest 68: 4/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The name "Emily" may conjure up images of sweet shyness. Perhaps this is a lingering effect of a character of the same name that Charles Dickens created for "David Copperfield", or perhaps the often placid yet lovely poetry of Emily Dickinson is partially responsible. But I assure you that my name's origin is not passive nor does it promise sweetness. Emily was the number one choice for baby girls' names in the US from 1997 to 2003 England for 2003 and 2004. The name's meaning is what the name "Emily" was without in those countries during those years. What would that be?

Answer: Rival

After reaching the nadir of its popularity in the 1960s when it ranked two hundred fifty-seventh in the US, "Emily" has soared in popularity, becoming number one in the US in 1996 and number one in England and Wales in 2003. It also ranked number one in New South Wales, Australia, in 2004. "Emily" is taken from the masculine "Aemelius", which in turn derived from the Latin "aemulus" meaning "to strive after another".

In ancient times "aemulus" could be used in a negative sense to connote a jealous, envious striving after the possessions or achievements of another.
2. One of the best known bearers of my name gained fame for his skepticism. In 2001 my name was number one for baby boys in France. In 2003 my name was number three in England and Wales. Don't doubt that you know my name. Which of the following is it?

Answer: Thomas

"Thomas" derives ultimately from the Aramaic "Te'oma" meaning "twin". The phrase "doubting Thomas" alludes to the disciple Thomas' doubting of Jesus' resurrection until he saw (and touched) for himself the wounds in Jesus' hands and side. (The story of doubting Thomas is recounted in the Bible in the book of John, verses nineteen through twenty-nine.)
3. Since my name means "universal", perhaps every woman should bear it! Perhaps someday every woman will; after all, in 2003 my name was the most popular name for newborn girls in Scotland, Ireland and Sweden. I was still number two in the US, but a certain "rival" had best watch out! What is my name?

Answer: Emma

My name derives from the Germanic word "ermen", which meant "whole" or "universal". Perhaps the renewed popularity of Jane Austen's "Emma" has something to do with the surging popularity of my name. By the way, one of the 2000 copies of the first edition of "Emma" is presently on sale.

It could be yours for a mere $20,000 if you hurry. Apply to "http://www.theworldsgreatbooks.com/emma.htm"
4. I am the MAN! No really. That's what my name means. My name didn't crack the top ten in the US until 1993, but the name has stayed there ever since. My namesake in the Bible had a brother named Peter. Which of the following names is mine?

Answer: Andrew

Andrew derives from the Greek word "aner" meaning man or husband. This did not stop "Andrew" from being in the top 1000 as a name for girl babies in the 1980s. The other Greek word for man, "anthropos", often had a negative connotation when used in ancient Greek writing.
5. My parents named me after their favorite Welsh lake. My name is not so popular as a certain one meaning "green shoot" nor is it given to girls as often as the name taken from the longest river in Ireland. At least it doesn't double as an herb like a certain English name that refers to the sea. Which of the following names is mine?

Answer: Lynn

"Lynn" is from a Welsh word meaning "lake". "Chloe", meaning "green shoot", was number one in England and Wales and Scotland for many years. In 2003 "Chloe" lost its top standing in the British Isles when its rival Emily vaulted into first place and Ellie pushed past into second in England and Wales. Chloe lost even more ground in Scotland where it dropped to fifth in 2003. (If anyone can explain this decline in popularity, please notify the quiz author! An article appearing in the BBC in early 2004 was at a loss to do so.) "Shannon" is the name of Ireland's longest river and its Gaelic roots "sean" and "abhann" mean "old or wise" and "river", respectively. "Rosemary" may be from the Latin "ros marinus" designating "dew of the sea" but is, of course, also the name of a well known herb.
6. I was given my great great grandfather's first name, and I note with satisfaction that it became the number one name for baby boys in Scotland in 2004. It is the English spelling of a French name that was often taken by French Kings. Because this is a "fill in", I will give you two literary hints: "Jabberwocky" and Narnia. What is my name?

Answer: Lewis

"Lewis" derived ultimately from "Ludwig" ("hlud wig" i.e. famous warrior). Lewis Carroll authored both "Alice in Wonderland" and the wonderful poem "Jabberwocky". C. S. Lewis wrote a famous and much loved fantasy series that took place in Narnia.
7. I love my first and middle name, but I admit it doesn't always fit my personae; you see it means "anointed flower of heaven". My first name is from my German grandmother and the middle from my Hawaiian grandmother. Can you pick my name out of the ones following? (Hint: look for the flower in the middle.)

Answer: Kristin Leilani

"Kristin" is the Scandinavian and German feminine from of "Christian". However, "Christian" derives ultimately from a Greek word meaning "anointed". "Lei" is Hawaiian for "flower", and "Lani" is Hawaiian for "heaven". "Camillus", from which the lovely French name "Camille" derives, was a warrior maiden.

The Romans wrongly thought a Greek word for pure was the precursor of their name "Katerina". Although the exact derivation is unclear, "Katerina" and "Catherine" may ultimately have originated from a Greek word meaning "torture". "Melanie" derives from a Greek word meaning "dark" or "black".
8. My name is uniformly popular in many countries from Belgium and France to the British Isles and North America. In the US, my name jumped in popularity beginning in the 1970s. Some might speculate that a popular 1960's folk singer had something to do with this. My name is Welsh in origin and means "great sea". What is my name? (Hint: The answer is blowing in the wind!)

Answer: Dylan

Although any connection with the career of Bob Dylan may be coincidental, "Dylan" broke into the top 1000 at 392 for boy's names in the 1970s. It has steadily risen in popularity and is in the top thirty of all the countries mentioned above. In the last two years the name has cracked the top 1000 among girl baby names in the US.
9. I hope you won't take offense, but I'm the original fair-haired boy. My name derives from a sixth century Irish Saint whose name literally meant "fair hair". But my name has been steadily declining in popularity; and because of the suspicions surrounding a certain American baseball player, it could become less popular still. What is my name?

Answer: Barry

"Barry" is derived from "Bairre", a nickname for Fionnbharr ("Fair head"). Since the 1940s, in the US, the popularity of Barry has gradually declined from seventy-ninth to eighty-eighth as a name for newborn boys. Some with the name "Barry" are musically inclined. Barry Manilow, Baz Luhmann and Barry McGuire come to mind.
10. Although there is doubt and debate about the exact number of words William Shakespeare coined (with estimates running as high as 2000), apparently my name was one of them. In "Twelfth Night" my namesake was described as a "most radiant, exquisite and unmatchable beauty". Another bearer of my name starred opposite John Travolta in the movie version of "Grease". For over forty years, my name has been steadily rising in popularity in the US where it reached fifth place for baby girls' names in 2003. What is my name?

Answer: Olivia

It was Olivia Newton-John who starred in "Grease" with John Travolta. The Bard also coined the other three names offered as choices. Miranda was Prospero's daughter in "The Tempest". Shakespeare named King Lear's noble and scrupulously honest daughter "Cordelia". "Jessica" was the name the Bard gave Shylock's daughter in "The Merchant of Venice".
Source: Author uglybird

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor ArleneRimmer before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
4/23/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us