FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Fran in Japan
Quiz about Fran in Japan

Fran in Japan Trivia Quiz


Wow, such holiday, much excitement! I'm Fran the shiba inu. My human travels around Japan a lot, visiting different prefectures, and he likes to take me with him. Here are ten of them.

A photo quiz by Kankurette. Estimated time: 5 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Geography Trivia
  6. »
  7. Asia
  8. »
  9. Japan

Author
Kankurette
Time
5 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
392,764
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
271
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 174 (5/10), Guest 23 (5/10), mungojerry (9/10).
-
Question 1 of 10
1. My human has to keep me on a leash when going for a walk around the capital of a certain prefecture - which shares its name with the prefecture - because of the tame deer that sometimes wander the streets. There is also a park in the city where the deer roam, and I wish I could chase them! Where can this deer park be found? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. My human has been to see the Japanese Grand Prix a few times (me, I find the whole idea dead boring, and the cars are too fast for me to keep up with anyway). For several years, the Japanese Grand Prix was held at a racing circuit in Mie Prefecture, though it briefly closed between 2007 and 2009. Known for its figure 8-shaped layout, what is the name of this racing circuit? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. I love going for walks with my human around Matsushima Bay in Miyagi Prefecture. The bay and its islands are so beautiful, they have been ranked as one of the Three Views of Japan. The bay, and the town of Matsushima, are named for the trees that grow there - what does 'Matsushima' mean in English? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. One of my fellow Japanese dogs, Hachiko the Akita, is so famous he had a statue made of him. You can find it at the station in the Tokyo Prefecture, where he and his human, Professor Hidesaburo Ueno, used to meet. Which station is this? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. One time when my human and I were in the Kyoto Prefecture, he took me to the Gion Matsuri. It's a really big festival, and an old one that's been taking place for centuries, with lots of stalls selling food and a huge parade to cap it off. In which month does this festival take place? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Hokkaido is the furthest north of Japan's four islands, and I've been there a couple of times with my human and hung out with his friends' Hokkaido-ken (they look a bit like us Shibas!) There's an island nearby called Sakhalin Island, which belongs to Russia, and a city called Sapporo where they have a snow festival. There aren't many prefectures here, though. How many prefectures are there on Hokkaido? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. My human loves udon, the signature food of Shikoku, and sometimes when he goes out for food, he lets me eat his leftovers. One prefecture, the smallest in Japan, has a type of square udon named after it - sort of. It's called sanuki udon, after the old name for the prefecture. What is this prefecture called now? It shares its name with a former Manchester United player. Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. I have a soft spot for the Nagano Prefecture for two reasons; firstly, one of my ancestors, the Shinshu Shiba, came from there, and secondly, I love playing with my human in the snow. In fact, the snow makes it a good place for winter sports, like the Winter Olympics. Here's some facts about Nagano, but which one is the odd one out? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. When we go walking in the Oki Islands, my human has to be careful where he takes me - some of the volcanic areas there are a bit rocky for little dogs! However, the hiking trail along the Kuniga coast is a popular trail for walkers, and I've enjoyed it too. To which prefecture do the Oki Islands belong? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. My human and I take a trip to Okinawa, a prefecture that incorporates several islands, including the Ryukyu chain. The warm climate makes me thirsty, but I love to swim in the sea and play on the beaches! Okinawa was a nation in its own right until 1879 and has many fascinating features, but which of these facts about Okinawa is NOT true? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




View Image Attributions for This Quiz

Most Recent Scores
May 21 2024 : Guest 174: 5/10
May 20 2024 : Guest 23: 5/10
May 18 2024 : mungojerry: 9/10
Apr 25 2024 : rainbowriver: 10/10
Apr 20 2024 : bucki82: 7/10
Apr 09 2024 : magijoh1: 10/10

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. My human has to keep me on a leash when going for a walk around the capital of a certain prefecture - which shares its name with the prefecture - because of the tame deer that sometimes wander the streets. There is also a park in the city where the deer roam, and I wish I could chase them! Where can this deer park be found?

Answer: Nara

If you're a 'Naruto' fan, you'll recognise the name of this city as it's also the name of Shikamaru's clan, the Nara, who keep deer. There are over a thousand of them in Nara Park, and you can buy crackers from vendors nearby to feed the deer. However, if a deer is bowing its head, it isn't being polite - it's a sign that the deer is about to charge, so be careful.

According to Shinto legend, sika deer are the protectors of the city, ever since the thunder god Takemikazuchi arrived on Mount Mikasa on a white deer. Today, they are considered as protected animals.
2. My human has been to see the Japanese Grand Prix a few times (me, I find the whole idea dead boring, and the cars are too fast for me to keep up with anyway). For several years, the Japanese Grand Prix was held at a racing circuit in Mie Prefecture, though it briefly closed between 2007 and 2009. Known for its figure 8-shaped layout, what is the name of this racing circuit?

Answer: Suzuka Circuit

Transport plays a big role in Mie; the north is home to several transport building companies, including a Honda factory (which produced the Honda Civic), and the prefecture is also the home of the Japanese Grand Prix, held in Ino in Suzuka City. The brainchild of Soichiro Honda (yes, the same one who makes the cars), the Suzuka Circuit is one of the more notorious circuits; the French Formula 1 driver Jules Bianchi died as a result of injuries sustained there.

It was briefly replaced as the site of the Japanese Grand Prix by the Fuji Speedway, but was reopened in 2009 after some redesigning work. (All the other answers are names of Japanese Formula 1 drivers.)
3. I love going for walks with my human around Matsushima Bay in Miyagi Prefecture. The bay and its islands are so beautiful, they have been ranked as one of the Three Views of Japan. The bay, and the town of Matsushima, are named for the trees that grow there - what does 'Matsushima' mean in English?

Answer: Pine Island

The 260 or so islands that make up the Matsushima Islands are covered with pine trees (like the ones in the picture), hence the name. They are considered to be one of Japan's most beautiful sights, so much so that there are four spots nearby where the views are said to be particularly excellent.

These spots are Soukan ('Magnificent View') in Otakamori, Yuukan ('Enchanting View') in Ogidani, Ikan ('Grand View') in Tamonsan, and Reikan ('Beautiful View') in Toyama. Nearby attractions include the Zen Buddhist temple of Zuigan-ji, which features several caves carved into rock that were used to house the ashes of the dead, and the Satohama Shell Midden, one of many mounds made up of mollusc shells and other animal remnants in Matsushima Bay.
4. One of my fellow Japanese dogs, Hachiko the Akita, is so famous he had a statue made of him. You can find it at the station in the Tokyo Prefecture, where he and his human, Professor Hidesaburo Ueno, used to meet. Which station is this?

Answer: Shibuya

While Britain has Greyfriars Bobby, Japan has Hachiko. The Akita used to come to Shibuya Station to greet Professor Ueno on his return from work at the Imperial University. One day, the professor did not return, and Hachiko subsequently waited for him at the station every day for nine years. The dog soon became a national sensation, with articles published about him, praising him for his loyalty. Hachiko died on the streets of Shibuya, aged eleven, and he was cremated, with his ashes being buried alongside those of his master.

The original Hachiko statue was made by Teru Ando and erected at the station in 1934, with Hachiko there for its unveiling, but was later melted down for the war effort. Ando's son Takeshi made a second statue, erected in 1948 outside one of the station's entrances. There is also a statue of Hachiko and Ueno at the Agricultural Department of University of Tokyo, built to commemorate the 80th anniversary of Hachiko's death in 2015. There is also a minibus service in the Shibuya ward; the buses have a cartoon Hachiko on them.

Shibuya is one of the 'tokubetsu-ku', the 23 special wards at the core of Tokyo (as Wikipedia suggests, think New York City or London boroughs, and you get the idea). It has one of the busiest stations in Tokyo and a shopping district nearby, which includes the massive 109 department store.
5. One time when my human and I were in the Kyoto Prefecture, he took me to the Gion Matsuri. It's a really big festival, and an old one that's been taking place for centuries, with lots of stalls selling food and a huge parade to cap it off. In which month does this festival take place?

Answer: July

The annual Gion Matsuri, named after the Gion district of Kyoto, lasts throughout July and it has a similar background to the Passion Play at Oberammergau. It originated in the 9th century, when Emperor Seiwa ordered the people to pray to the god Susano'o-no-Mikoto - the god of the local Yasaka Shrine - after an outbreak of plague. Mikoshi - portable shrines carried on palanquins, like the one in the picture - and sixty-six halberds, one for each province of Japan, were placed in a local garden. The practice was repeated whenever there was a similar outbreak, and it became an official event in 970.

Nowadays, as well as mikoshi, the parades also have floats, and in the days leading up to the parades - known as the yoiyama - the streets are lined with food stalls, and traditional Japanese houses in the old kimono district open their entryways to the public and put family heirlooms on display, in a practice known as the Byoubu Matsuri ('Folding Screen Festival'). The floats in the parade are known as Yamaboko, and some of them represent the halberds used in the original ritual. They are usually presided over by local families.
6. Hokkaido is the furthest north of Japan's four islands, and I've been there a couple of times with my human and hung out with his friends' Hokkaido-ken (they look a bit like us Shibas!) There's an island nearby called Sakhalin Island, which belongs to Russia, and a city called Sapporo where they have a snow festival. There aren't many prefectures here, though. How many prefectures are there on Hokkaido?

Answer: One

Hokkaido is both an island and a prefecture - Hokkaido Prefecture is the only one on the island. The northernmost of the four islands of Japan, Hokkaido is separated from Honshu by the Tsugaru Strait, and is also accessible by rail through the underground Seikan Tunnel. Sakhalin Island lies north of Hokkaido, and became completely Russian - save for the disputed territories of the southern Kuril Islands - when Japan gave up its territory there with the Treaty of San Francisco in 1951.

The Sapporo Yuki Matsuri, or Snow Festival, is an annual festival held in February, which features an international snow sculpture contest in Odori Park, and several structures made out of snow and ice. These include stages for bands to play on, snow slides at Tsu Dome, and an enormous maze. Sculptures can be anything from Godzilla to buildings to baseball players; each year, there is a theme.
7. My human loves udon, the signature food of Shikoku, and sometimes when he goes out for food, he lets me eat his leftovers. One prefecture, the smallest in Japan, has a type of square udon named after it - sort of. It's called sanuki udon, after the old name for the prefecture. What is this prefecture called now? It shares its name with a former Manchester United player.

Answer: Kagawa

Kagawa is Japan's smallest prefecture, separated from its neighbour Tokushima by the Sanuki Mountains. It is well known for its udon, with over 700 udon restaurants, and was also the first place in Japan to cultivate olives. In fact, the town of Shodoshima has a working olive grove which also doubles as a park open to the public, and sells various olive-related products, including ice cream and cosmetics. Citrus fruits such as yuzu and mikan (also known as satsuma) are also cultivated in Shikoku in general, thanks to its warm climate.

The player in question is Shinji Kagawa, who has also played for Borussia Dortmund and the Japanese national team.
8. I have a soft spot for the Nagano Prefecture for two reasons; firstly, one of my ancestors, the Shinshu Shiba, came from there, and secondly, I love playing with my human in the snow. In fact, the snow makes it a good place for winter sports, like the Winter Olympics. Here's some facts about Nagano, but which one is the odd one out?

Answer: Nagano is closer to the sea than any other point in Japan

Nagano is one of the more mountainous prefectures of Japan, home to major parts of the Kita, Chuou and Minami Alps, and is a popular destination for skiers. The village of Hakuba, home to several ski resorts, was used as a venue for several events in the 1998 Winter Olympics.

Lake Suwa contains a hot spring, and even when the surface of the lake freezes over in winter, the lower water still circulates, creating ridges known as O-Miwatari ('gods' crossing'). Local legend claims that the gods form these ridges while travelling around the Suwa Grand Shrine.

Matsumoto Castle is known as 'Crow Castle' due to its black exterior. It was built in the Sengoku period, and was presided over by the shogun Ieyasu Tokugawa, founder of the Tokugawa shogunate, and later his retainer Kazumasa Ishikawa.

It is actually the home of the furthest point from the sea, the city of Saku.
9. When we go walking in the Oki Islands, my human has to be careful where he takes me - some of the volcanic areas there are a bit rocky for little dogs! However, the hiking trail along the Kuniga coast is a popular trail for walkers, and I've enjoyed it too. To which prefecture do the Oki Islands belong?

Answer: Shimane

The Oki Islands are an archipelago of sixteen islands, though only four of these islands are inhabited. They are volcanic in origin and contain some of Japan's oldest rocks; the Douzen Islands of Nishinoshima, Nakanoshima and Chiburijima were formed by a caldera. Daisen-Oki National Park, which contains a large portion of Dougojima, also features volcanic mountains, such as the enormous Mount Daisen.

The Kuniga coastline trail starts at the top of the Mantengai Cliff, which is 257m high, and goes downwards, with a rocky arch - the Tsutenkyo Arch - at the bottom.
10. My human and I take a trip to Okinawa, a prefecture that incorporates several islands, including the Ryukyu chain. The warm climate makes me thirsty, but I love to swim in the sea and play on the beaches! Okinawa was a nation in its own right until 1879 and has many fascinating features, but which of these facts about Okinawa is NOT true?

Answer: Aguni Island is famed for its sushi restaurants

To explain the answers in more detail:

The island in question is Iriomote, home to the Iriomote cat, known as the 'yamamayaa' in the local Yaeyama language. The cat is critically endangered, and there are only a few of them left in the wild. It preys on birds, rats, and even young wild boar.

The Ryukyuan languages are in the Japonic family, the same language family as Japanese, and although some linguists consider them to be dialects of Japanese, they're not mutually intelligible with Japanese. One of these languages is Okinawan; the Okinawan name for Okinawa Island is 'Uchinaaguchi'.

The bases on Okinawa are financed by both the US and Japan, and provide employment there, though many residents dislike their presence due to noise and pollution. Approximately 75% of US troops stationed in Japan are based in Okinawa, despite its relatively small size.

As for Aguni Island, it has no restaurants or convenience stores, though it does have a hotel and a number of guest houses, often used by visiting scuba divers. It is home to the village of Aguni, and part of the Shimajiri District.
Source: Author Kankurette

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor agony before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series The Space Series:

I decided to set myself a challenge of writing a quiz in every single category, with one common bond - each quiz is named after a song by the Liverpool band Space. I will keep adding to this list as they get uploaded

  1. Female of the Species Average
  2. Mister Psycho Average
  3. Me & You Versus the World Average
  4. Dark Clouds Very Easy
  5. Avenging Angels Average
  6. I Am Unlike a Lifeform You've Ever Met Average
  7. A Liddle Biddy Help from Elvis Average
  8. Bad Days Average
  9. Fran in Japan Average
  10. Everybody in the Madhouse Average
  11. Love You More Than Football Easier
  12. Punk Rock Funeral Average

5/27/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us