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Quiz about ANZAC Defining the Identity of Australia
Quiz about ANZAC Defining the Identity of Australia

ANZAC: Defining the Identity of Australia Quiz


On 25 April, 1915, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZACs) landed in Gallipoli. Arising from this fierce WWI battle, the Anzac Spirit was born and lives on today. It defines us as a people and it will never die. This is the Anzac story.

A multiple-choice quiz by Team Australian Players. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
1nn1
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
367,212
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
554
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 1 (10/10), Guest 175 (8/10), Guest 174 (6/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. In 1915, Australia and New Zealand were young countries. When the ANZACs landed at Gallipoli, they fought valiantly in a desperate but futile battle. However they fought honorably, and the traits they demonstrated fighting a common enemy became known as the ANZAC legend and defined the identity of Australia as a country. Which one of the following is NOT a defining characteristic of the ANZAC legend? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. The Second Boer War (1899-1902) took place in South Africa between Britain and the Boers. At the beginning of the war, troops from Australia fought on the British side, but not under an Australian flag. Why not? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. In 1915 as part of WWI, the ANZACs landed on Gallipoli, a narrow peninsula in the Ottoman Empire, with orders to secure the area and the adjoining Dardanelles, a narrow strait separating Europe from Asia Minor. What was the importance of securing this area? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In Perth in August 1914, John Simpson (real name John Simpson Kirkpatrick) signed up and was made a field ambulance stretcher bearer because of his physical strength. What very unusual method did Simpson use in retrieving injured soldiers from the front line? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. During World War II, Erwin Rommel's apparently invincible Afrika-Korps were eventually stopped by a contingent of around 14,000 Australian soldiers with support from British artillery and Indian troops. During the long siege of this Libyan location, the German propaganda coined an apparently derogatory term for these gallant stalwarts. What did Lord Haw Haw call them which soon evolved into a badge of great honour and distinction? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Following the merger of Malaya, Singapore and small states such as Sabah and Sarawak in the north of Borneo to form Malaysia, a neighbouring country set about attempting to destabilise this federation. These attempts led to an undeclared and largely unreported war lasting three years from 1963 to 1966 to which Australia sent two battalions of troops in support of Malaysia.

Which country was involved in this confrontation, called "Konfrontasi" by the would be invaders?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Anzac biscuits are an iconic part of our cuisine. They were sent to the ANZACs in Europe. What key ingredient normally found in biscuits (cookies), is lacking in Anzac biscuits? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. One of the reasons Anzac Day became "popular" again in the 1980s was due to the release of "Gallipoli" (1981), an Australian movie portraying the landing on Gallipoli in 1915. The plot follows two young Australians, Archy Hamilton (Mark Lee) and Frank Dunne as they lose their innocence as they become entrenched in the war. Which soon to be well-known actor played Frank Dunne? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. While this quiz is mainly about the Australian aspects of Anzac Day, Anzac Day is very much a part of the New Zealand identity as well. What major difference marks the way New Zealand commemorates Anzac Day compared with Australia? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Anzac Day commemorates the landing of the ANZACs at Gallipoli in 1915. What is the date of the landing? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In 1915, Australia and New Zealand were young countries. When the ANZACs landed at Gallipoli, they fought valiantly in a desperate but futile battle. However they fought honorably, and the traits they demonstrated fighting a common enemy became known as the ANZAC legend and defined the identity of Australia as a country. Which one of the following is NOT a defining characteristic of the ANZAC legend?

Answer: Respect for authority

There is no doubt that the Gallipoli landing in WWI in 1915 was a nation-defining event for Australians and New Zealanders. Young men who had shown courage to tame their wild and tough homeland went to war to help the "Motherland", Britain. The ANZAC legend became the Anzac spirit in three parts:

According to Robert Manne, who wrote in "The War Myth that Made Us" published in "The Age" newspaper in 2007, that "General Birdwood [British] told Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett, (a British war correspondent), 'that he couldn't sufficiently praise the courage, endurance and the soldierly qualities of the Colonials. (The ANZACs) were happy because they had been tried for the first time and not found wanting'". This report was published all around Australia. The Anzac spirit was born.
Charles Bean, an Australian war historian believed that during the Gallipoli Campaign, definitive features of the Australian identity were revealed. He stated in his 1946 book: "ANZACs to Amiens", "Australians were innocent and fit; stoical and laconic; irreverent in the face of hidebound authority; naturally egalitarian and disdainful of British class differences. Above all, in times of trouble, they stood by their mates. Life would not have been worth living if they had betrayed the ideal of mateship".
The third characteristic is remembrance of those who fought and died. Les Carlyon, an Australian writer quotes in his book "Gallipoli" (2001) an Australian soldier, who said after eight months was ordered to retreat to the Gallipoli shore, "I hope they won't hear us marching back to the beach." This refers to the ANZACs who died and would not return.
In subsequent years, when remembering the ANZACs, that melancholy feeling is echoed in every Returned Servicemen League club around the nation with the saying of "For the Fallen" (1914) better known as "Ode to Remembrance" stating, "We shall remember Them", usually following by a bugle playing "The Last Post" (1868). I doubt there would be many Australians and New Zealanders who would not be moved when hearing these two parts of our cultural heritage.
Submitted by 1nn1.
2. The Second Boer War (1899-1902) took place in South Africa between Britain and the Boers. At the beginning of the war, troops from Australia fought on the British side, but not under an Australian flag. Why not?

Answer: Australia did not exist as a country

Australia was not a country until Federation, on January 1, 1901. Prior to that, the troops fought as parts of British units, units from the separate states, or as irregulars. In total, there were about 20,000 involved. The Australians gained a reputation as fine soldiers, particularly as mounted marauders.

Submitted by ozzz2002.
3. In 1915 as part of WWI, the ANZACs landed on Gallipoli, a narrow peninsula in the Ottoman Empire, with orders to secure the area and the adjoining Dardanelles, a narrow strait separating Europe from Asia Minor. What was the importance of securing this area?

Answer: It provided a sea route to Russia

The Black Sea was blockaded by the German Navy in 1914. The Dardanelles Strait was a narrow seaway to the Black Sea that was a major supply route to Russia. It was held by the Turks as part of the Ottoman Empire. If the Allies could take the Dardanelles, they would have a good chance of gaining access to the Black Sea. The attack on Gallipoli was a failure. It was not due to lack of effort or willingness by the ANZACs, but the hills to take from the beaches were steep and the Turkish forces were well entrenched in the high ground. The campaign continued until December 1915-January 1916, when the troops were evacuated. Unlike the ill-prepared landing, the evacuation was planned in great detail and few men were lost during the evacuation.

While the ANZACs may not have won, the birth of the Anzac spirit was born on the shores of Gallipoli.
4. In Perth in August 1914, John Simpson (real name John Simpson Kirkpatrick) signed up and was made a field ambulance stretcher bearer because of his physical strength. What very unusual method did Simpson use in retrieving injured soldiers from the front line?

Answer: He used a donkey

Simpson and his donkey are part of the narrative of the ANZAC. There are many accounts of how Simpson, who landed with the first ANZACs on April 25, 1915, seemed oblivious to the danger around him as he and his donkey (called Duffy, Murphy and Abdul in various accounts) retrieved injured soldiers from the front line to take them to the beach where the soldiers then received medical attention or were evacuated.

There are mixed accounts of the origin of the donkey but there is no doubt that on 19 May 1915, Simpson was killed during the third attack on Anzac Cove.

He was 22. While he was commended for his bravery, he received no official recognition other than in dispatches by Colonel John Monash. However, the photos and the paintings of Simpson and his donkey endure, as does the spirit of the Anzac that they represented.
5. During World War II, Erwin Rommel's apparently invincible Afrika-Korps were eventually stopped by a contingent of around 14,000 Australian soldiers with support from British artillery and Indian troops. During the long siege of this Libyan location, the German propaganda coined an apparently derogatory term for these gallant stalwarts. What did Lord Haw Haw call them which soon evolved into a badge of great honour and distinction?

Answer: Rats of Tobruk

Aussie troops fought in many areas of Europe and in the Pacific during World War II. There were several key turning points in the war against Germany including the battle of Stalingrad in the east and the major change in fortunes in North Africa. Rommel was stopped by the Rats of Tobruk during 1941. The success of the Tobruk garrison after a siege lasting from April to August 1941 provided some rare good news for the Allies. Lord Haw Haw's actual quote referred to the 'poor desert rats of Tobruk'; the intended pejorative soon became synonymous with perseverance and courage against great odds, and again exemplified the importance of mateship in times of trial.

Question by MikeMaster99
6. Following the merger of Malaya, Singapore and small states such as Sabah and Sarawak in the north of Borneo to form Malaysia, a neighbouring country set about attempting to destabilise this federation. These attempts led to an undeclared and largely unreported war lasting three years from 1963 to 1966 to which Australia sent two battalions of troops in support of Malaysia. Which country was involved in this confrontation, called "Konfrontasi" by the would be invaders?

Answer: Indonesia

Indonesia claimed that the formation of Malaysia was merely an attempt by Britain to extend its colonial presence. Starting with bands of Indonesian "volunteers" crossing the border in Borneo, it escalated to include Indonesian regular troops. While most of the action took place on the island of Borneo, attempts were made to land Indonesian amphibious and parachute troops on the Malay Peninsula itself.

As escalation of the conflict occurred. Fighting extended back into Indonesia with Australian and Commonwealth troops crossing the border to pursue Indonesian infiltrators, who most frequently were Indonesian Special Forces units. Confrontation ceased after the overthrow of General Sukarno in 1966 and a peace accord was signed recognising Malaysia.

Altogether, two squadrons of the Special Air Service, a troop of the Royal Australian Signals, several artillery batteries and parties of the Royal Australian Engineers were involved in Borneo, in addition to the two infantry battalions. Ships of the Royal Australian Navy served in the surrounding waters and several RAAF squadrons were also involved in the Confrontation.

Although there was significant Australian involvement, the war received very little media coverage at the time and would soon be overshadowed by Australia's growing involvement in Vietnam.
Question submitted by tonye49
7. Anzac biscuits are an iconic part of our cuisine. They were sent to the ANZACs in Europe. What key ingredient normally found in biscuits (cookies), is lacking in Anzac biscuits?

Answer: Eggs

Soldier's biscuits were sent to ANZACs fighting in Europe to supplement the restricted diet offered by the army. The biscuits lack eggs for two reasons: eggs were hard to come by during the war; and, because the biscuits had to travel halfway around the world, they needed to be made with ingredients that would not spoil. The biscuits were "bound" with golden syrup or treacle. The name Anzac biscuits has been in use since 1915 but these were for recipes totally unrelated to what we now know as Anzac biscuits. The first use of named Anzac biscuits using a recipe that utilised oats and golden syrup can be attributed to a Dunedin (NZ) recipe in 1921.

Question submitted by 1nn1 who enjoys an Anzac biscuit or two with his morning cup of coffee.
8. One of the reasons Anzac Day became "popular" again in the 1980s was due to the release of "Gallipoli" (1981), an Australian movie portraying the landing on Gallipoli in 1915. The plot follows two young Australians, Archy Hamilton (Mark Lee) and Frank Dunne as they lose their innocence as they become entrenched in the war. Which soon to be well-known actor played Frank Dunne?

Answer: Mel Gibson

Mel Gibson plays Frank Dunne. While the movie accurately paints a picture of Australia as a young nation in the 1910s, there was some criticism of the movie as it appeared to show the British were in command and that they were responsible for sending the young ANZACs towards a probable death. Nevertheless the movie successfully showed the horrors of war, particularly emphasizing the enormous dangers faced by the ANZACs during the Gallipoli campaign.
9. While this quiz is mainly about the Australian aspects of Anzac Day, Anzac Day is very much a part of the New Zealand identity as well. What major difference marks the way New Zealand commemorates Anzac Day compared with Australia?

Answer: Nothing. The commemoration is similar in both countries

Anzac Day in New Zealand is commemorated in a very similar manner to Australia. Dawn Services feature, as do shops remaining closed until afternoon. One minor difference is that the NZ Returned Services Association has Poppy Day on Anzac day while other countries, including Australia tend to have Poppy Day on November 11th (in recognition of the armistice in 1918).
Two-up, an Australian gambling game that pre-dates WWI by at least 100 years, was popular with ANZACs on the fighting front. Anzac Day is the one day of the year when it is actually legal to play.
Anzac Day is also commemorated in Turkey, Nuie, the Cook Islands, Samoa and Tonga.
10. Anzac Day commemorates the landing of the ANZACs at Gallipoli in 1915. What is the date of the landing?

Answer: April 25th

Anzac Day is commemorated on April 25th. Unlike other public holidays in Australia, it is commemorated on the day itself, whereas other public holidays tend to be celebrated at the end or start of the week to give a three day weekend. If ANZAC day falls on a weekend, a public holiday is granted on the Monday but this is not Anzac Day.

8,500 Australian and 2,721 New Zealand ANZACs lost their lives on Gallipoli.

Most Australians and New Zealanders will recognise Laurence Binyon's "For the Fallen" [1914] The fourth verse is usually recited as a concluding part of the ANZAC Day service followed by the haunting solitary bugle sounding "The Last Post" (1868):
"They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old,
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them."

Lest We Forget.
Source: Author 1nn1

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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