FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Australias Sordid Past 4
Quiz about Australias Sordid Past 4

Australia's Sordid Past: 4 Trivia Quiz


It has been a while, but here is another quiz about the worst of Australian criminals. I cannot stress this enough, it is not for the kiddies, or weak minded. Gruesome details follow .... Be careful, is it the obvious answer or is there more to it?

A multiple-choice quiz by Lssah. Estimated time: 7 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. History Trivia
  6. »
  7. Australian History
  8. »
  9. Australia 1900s

Author
Lssah
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
346,391
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
357
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 1 (4/10), Guest 185 (0/10), Guest 161 (1/10).
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. In 1960 a Maltese man by the name of Salvatore Tabone was found murdered in his home. What was unusual about the crime scene? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. The name of Graeme Thorne, and the date of the 7th of July, 1960 signaled a new era in crime that would be remembered by many for what reason? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. For nearly three years during the 1960s this man went on a killing spree that had detectives baffled. He is considered to be Australia's first serial killer. Who is it? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Eric Edgar Cooke was a serial killer who killed eight people and committed various other crimes in the Western Australian capital of Perth. What association to Cooke, if any, can be made with the names of Darryl Beamish and John Button? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The hijacking of Flight 408 over Brisbane on 19th July 1960 was what? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. On 18th June 1964 a two year old blind girl, Suzanne Marshall, was admitted to the Royal Alexandria Hospital in Sydney for tests to see if her eyesight could be restored. A week later she was found dead in her cot. At first her death was ruled 'undetermined', but forensic tests established that it was murder.

Who killed young Suzanne Marshall?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. On 11th January 1965 two teenagers by the names of Marianne Schmidt and Christine Sharrock were last seen on a Sydney beach in New South Wales. On what beach were they seen together for the last time, and what crime was committed against them? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. One of the most famous Australian cases of abduction took place on Australia Day, 1966. Where did this crime take place, and who was taken? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. In 1966 Peter Raymond Kocan had a dream: he wanted to be famous and he wanted to be remembered by all Australians. What crime did he attempt to commit to ensure his name would be remembered? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. On 3rd February 1967 Ronald Ryan entered the Australian criminal history hall of fame for what event? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
May 16 2024 : Guest 1: 4/10
May 06 2024 : Guest 185: 0/10
Apr 11 2024 : Guest 161: 1/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In 1960 a Maltese man by the name of Salvatore Tabone was found murdered in his home. What was unusual about the crime scene?

Answer: The only door to the room that he was murdered in was nailed shut from the inside.

67-year-old Salvatore Tabone (also known as Samuel Borg, his anglicised name) lived by himself in North Melbourne, Victoria. He owned a café in the city and had a distrust of banks. He refused to keep his money in a bank and would store it at home. Friends started to worry about him when he had not been seen for a few days, so the police attended to check on his welfare. Police managed to get into his residence and when they tried to open the bedroom door they found it was unlocked, but attempts to open the door failed.

In the end the police had to break the door down and found that it had been firmly nailed shut (with roofing nails) - from the inside. Tabone's body was found hidden under a bed. He had been beaten to death with a wooden table-leg, and it was established that the killer then left the room via a skylight. Although £1,000 was supposedly taken, substantial sums of money were later found in various locations inside the residence, and a loaded pistol belonging to Tabone was located under the mattress.

The killer was never caught.
2. The name of Graeme Thorne, and the date of the 7th of July, 1960 signaled a new era in crime that would be remembered by many for what reason?

Answer: It was the first known kidnapping to take place in Australia that incorporated a ransom demand.

Graeme Thorne will sadly be remembered as the 8 year old boy that was kidnapped while on his way to school. His parents, Basil and Freda, had just won £100,000 in the Opera House lottery. Back in those days an amount of cash like that would be the equivalent of winning a million dollars in this day and age.
The Thorne's fortunate win did not go unnoticed by Stephen Leslie Bradley. His devious mind hatched a plan to make an easy score of cash and that resulted in the kidnapping of little Graeme. Soon after the kidnapping Graeme's distraught parents got the phone call that every parent would dread, "I have got your boy, I want 25,000 pounds by five o'clock or I'll feed him to the sharks".
A massive search for the child followed, but 5 weeks later his body was located. Evidence was collected and it was not long until detectives had pieced together the clues and were knocking on Bradley's door. Bradley was aware that the net was closing and had already fled the country. His freedom was short lived and he was arrested in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and an extradition order granted. He got a life sentence and died in gaol.
3. For nearly three years during the 1960s this man went on a killing spree that had detectives baffled. He is considered to be Australia's first serial killer. Who is it?

Answer: William MacDonald

The twisted William MacDonald (also known as Allen Edward Brennan) committed his first murder in 1960 in Queensland. He befriended Amos Hurst and during a drinking session he began to strangle his victim. MacDonald then punched Hurst in the face and the blow killed him. A quick clean up followed and Hurst was left in bed. MacDonald could not believe his luck when he read the obituary in the newspaper - the crime had not been detected and it was ruled a heart attack.

On the 4th of June, 1961, in Sydney, MacDonald resumed his crime spree, but in a much more brutal fashion. He killed Albert Greenfield by a violent, frenzied attack with a knife, leaving a terrible calling card.
It was not until November 1961 that MacDonald would strike again. His next victim was William Cobbin and the M.O (modus operandi) was the same as that of Greenfield.
On the 31st of March, 1962 victim number three of his Sydney killing spree was found. Frank Gladstone McLean died in the same horrid fashion as the previous victims. Patrick James Hackett would become the last victim in June 1962.
4. Eric Edgar Cooke was a serial killer who killed eight people and committed various other crimes in the Western Australian capital of Perth. What association to Cooke, if any, can be made with the names of Darryl Beamish and John Button?

Answer: They were both convicted and incarcerated for crimes committed by Cooke

In 1961 Darryl Beamish was convicted of the murder of Jillian Macpherson Brewer that took place in 1959. John Button was convicted of killing his girlfriend, Rosemary Anderson.

Both men spent a substantial time in prison for their 'crimes'. Many years later evidence surfaced that vindicated both of them. It turned out that Cooke had actually committed the crimes.
5. The hijacking of Flight 408 over Brisbane on 19th July 1960 was what?

Answer: Australia's first aircraft hijacking

Flight 408 was a Trans-Australia Airlines (TAA) flight that left Sydney, new South Wales bound for Brisbane, Queensland. The hijacker, Alex Hildebrandt, had managed to smuggle a bomb and a .22 calibre sawn-off rifle on-board. Forty nine passengers and crew were on the flight and even though Hildebrandt fired a warning shot to show that he wasn't mucking about, his plan failed. A brave crew member punched Hildebrandt, disabled the bomb and with the assistance of other crew members, restrained Hildebrandt.

Hildebrandt was jailed for his crime in Queensland for 3 years and after his release was re-arrested by New South Wales police and tried for the same incident in New South Wales. He then spent 7 more years as a prisoner, this time courtesy of the New South Wales government.
6. On 18th June 1964 a two year old blind girl, Suzanne Marshall, was admitted to the Royal Alexandria Hospital in Sydney for tests to see if her eyesight could be restored. A week later she was found dead in her cot. At first her death was ruled 'undetermined', but forensic tests established that it was murder. Who killed young Suzanne Marshall?

Answer: It has never been established

The forensic tests established that potassium cyanide was the cause of death. The body of the two year old had to be exhumed a month later for further testing. An anonymous phone call to police in 1972 claimed that the death was an accident and that a different child had been the intended victim.

A name was supplied nominating a suspect, but the police investigation failed to produce a killer. The murder remains a mystery.
7. On 11th January 1965 two teenagers by the names of Marianne Schmidt and Christine Sharrock were last seen on a Sydney beach in New South Wales. On what beach were they seen together for the last time, and what crime was committed against them?

Answer: Wanda Beach - Murder.

The case is known as the Wanda Beach Murders. On that day the two girls took Marianne's younger brothers and sisters to Wanda Beach for a day trip. The weather was not too good and in the early afternoon Christine and Marianne left the younger children near a sand dune and set off to collect their hidden bags. By 5pm they had not returned and the alarm was raised. Christine and Marianne were found partially buried on Wanda Beach the following day.

The girls had been bashed and stabbed repeatedly, Marianne's throat was slashed.

Despite a 10,000 pound reward and a massive police investigation, the killer was never identified. The case remains unsolved.
8. One of the most famous Australian cases of abduction took place on Australia Day, 1966. Where did this crime take place, and who was taken?

Answer: Glenelg Beach, South Australia - The Beaumont Children.

Just about every Australian would know the name of the Beaumont children. On Australia Day, 1966 Jane (9 years old), Arnna (7 years) and Grant Beaumont (4 years) went to the popular beach of Glenelg in Adelaide's western suburbs. That was the last time they were ever seen. The children had been seen playing with a blond haired man on the beach earlier in the day and were last seen in the late afternoon walking up the main street of Glenelg away from the beach. To this day it is not known what happened on that afternoon, who took the children, who the blond man is, or if the children are dead or alive.

Harold Holt disappeared from Cheviot Beach in 1967 when he went swimming. His body was never found.
Vicki Barton was 8 years old when she went missing from outside a hotel in the Blue Mountains, New South Wales in January 1969. Her body was located in the Blue Mountains, 19 months after her disappearance.
Anita Cobby was 26 years old when she was abducted from the Blacktown Railway Station, New South Wales in 1986. She was raped, murdered and dumped in a paddock. Police managed to catch and convict the five men that killed her.
9. In 1966 Peter Raymond Kocan had a dream: he wanted to be famous and he wanted to be remembered by all Australians. What crime did he attempt to commit to ensure his name would be remembered?

Answer: Assassinate an Australian politician.

Peter Kocan attempted to assassinate Arthur Calwell, the leader of the Labour Party. Kocan managed fire a shot while Calwell was seated inside a car, but he ultimately failed in his attempt. Luckily, the closed car window deflected the bullet and he only sustained injuries from the broken glass.

At the time Calwell was the first Australian politician to be the subject of an assassination attempt.
10. On 3rd February 1967 Ronald Ryan entered the Australian criminal history hall of fame for what event?

Answer: He was the last person to be executed in Australia.

On 3rd February 1967 Ronald Ryan dropped to his death at the gallows at Pentridge Gaol. He would be the last person to be executed in Australia due to heavy public protests. He was tried and convicted of murder for the shooting death of a prison guard during an escape from Pentridge Prison with fellow inmate, Peter John Walker, in 1965.

The public protests centred on the doubts raised that Ryan had not fired the fatal shot. Ryan's last words were directed to the hangman, he said, "God bless you, please make it quick."
Source: Author Lssah

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
5/27/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us