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Quiz about History of Japan 13331615
Quiz about History of Japan 13331615

History of Japan, 1333-1615 Trivia Quiz


Continuing this general history of Japan, from the fall of one Sh˘gunate in 1333, to the rise of another in 1615.

A multiple-choice quiz by Finduskeepus. Estimated time: 8 mins.
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Author
Finduskeepus
Time
8 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
287,981
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
8 / 15
Plays
667
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
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Question 1 of 15
1. In 1333, the followers of the Emperor Go-Daigo destroyed the Kamakura Bakufu (Sh˘gunate). In the years to come, one of them, Ashikaga Takauji, would drive Go-Daigo out of Ky˘to and establish a new Bakufu ruled by his own family. This new Sh˘gunate is known to history as what? Hint


Question 2 of 15
2. Although Go-Daigo had been driven out of Ky˘to, he still commanded the loyalty of powerful warriors such as Nitta Yoshisada and Kusunoki Masashige. However, they were defeated by the Ashikaga in 1336, at which battle? Hint


Question 3 of 15
3. After Go-Daigo had fled Ky˘to, the Ashikaga attempted to proceed as if he had been deposed, appointing a new Emperor, K˘my˘. However, Go-Daigo had other ideas and, from his base in modern-day Nara Prefecture, proclaimed that he was still the legitimate Emperor. Thus began a period in which Japan had two rival Imperial courts. What were the two courts called? Hint


Question 4 of 15
4. The third Ashikaga Sh˘gun, Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, oversaw a period of peace and artistic flowering. He also re-established the long-defunct links between Japan and China. Which of the following policies did he NOT adopt in his efforts to improve relations with the new Ming Dynasty? Hint


Question 5 of 15
5. The Ashikaga Sh˘guns began to rely on Constables (Shugo) to administer the provinces for them. Over time, the Shugo developed into powerful lords in their own right, becoming semi-independent in their provincial strongholds. What well-known word eventually came to describe them?

Answer: (One Word - starts with "D", no accent required)
Question 6 of 15
6. In 1467 began the ďnin War, a struggle between Shugo whose power now rivaled that of the Ashikaga. There had been similar conflicts between such warlords before, but what was different about the ďnin War? Hint


Question 7 of 15
7. After the ďnin War, Ashikaga control collapsed and Japan entered a long era of disunity in which rival warlords competed for power. What is this period called?

Answer: (One word - the [blank] Period)
Question 8 of 15
8. During this period, followers of the J˘d˘-shinshű Buddhist sect began to rise up in spontaneous acts of rebellion against samurai rule. What were these movements called? Hint


Question 9 of 15
9. During the period of civil war, there was a famous rivalry between two great warlords, who over the years fought five major battles on the plain of Kawanakajima. What were their names? Hint


Question 10 of 15
10. The unification of the country finally began in the mid-sixteenth century with the rise of the warlord Oda Nobunaga. Of which province was he the Daimy˘? Hint


Question 11 of 15
11. Oda Nobunaga was the first of the three great unifiers of Japan. The other two, Toyotomi Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu, were both closely connected to him. How were they connected? Hint


Question 12 of 15
12. After Nobunaga was assassinated in 1582, Hideyoshi and Ieyasu were the obvious candidates to succeed him. Hideyoshi, in the more powerful position, suggested that Ieyasu instead relocate to the eastern provinces and take over a vast domain there. Ieyasu accepted, establishing his headquarters at a small fishing village in the east. The village was then called Edo; it is now called...

Answer: (One Word - no accent)
Question 13 of 15
13. After Nobunaga's death, Hideyoshi completed the unification of the country, and subdued or appeased all the powerful Daimy˘. How did he follow up this success? Hint


Question 14 of 15
14. When Hideyoshi died, his son Hideyori was still an infant. The most powerful of Hideyoshi's allies acted as regents to the young heir. Tokugawa Ieyasu, the most powerful of all, soon began to dominate and opposition to him coalesced. The two sides met in 1600 at the most significant battle in the history of Japan. What is it called? Hint


Question 15 of 15
15. After winning the battle, Ieyasu was the master of Japan. However, he did not move to destroy Toyotomi Hideyori, Hideyoshi's son, until 1615, when he finally wiped out the remnants of the Toyotomi in their home base. Which modern-day Japanese city was the HQ of the Toyotomi? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In 1333, the followers of the Emperor Go-Daigo destroyed the Kamakura Bakufu (Sh˘gunate). In the years to come, one of them, Ashikaga Takauji, would drive Go-Daigo out of Ky˘to and establish a new Bakufu ruled by his own family. This new Sh˘gunate is known to history as what?

Answer: The Muromachi Bakufu

Although the term was not used while Takauji himself was alive, the government of his descendants is known as the Muromachi Bakufu. Muromachi is a district of Ky˘to which, from the time of the third Ashikaga Sh˘gun, Yoshimitsu, was the headquarters of the Bakufu.

Kitayama is the site of Yoshimitsu's famous palace, and is the name given to the culture that developed during his time. "Kemmu" was the Imperial era name of the years 1334-1336, during which Go-Daigo had briefly been "restored" to power. His short tenure is known as the Kemmu Restoration. The Edo Bakufu belongs to a much later era; it refers to the Sh˘gunate of the Tokugawa family, dating from 1603
2. Although Go-Daigo had been driven out of Ky˘to, he still commanded the loyalty of powerful warriors such as Nitta Yoshisada and Kusunoki Masashige. However, they were defeated by the Ashikaga in 1336, at which battle?

Answer: The battle of Minatogawa

Kusunoki Masashige, one of the greatest generals in the history of Japan, advised Go-Daigo not to directly confront the Ashikaga forces as they advanced north toward Ky˘to, but his advice was not followed, and he was ordered to meet the enemy at Minatogawa, near the modern city of Kobe. Loyal to the end, Masashige obeyed his Emperor and met his death in the resulting defeat.

The battles of Okehazama and Nagashino are key dates in the career of Oda Nobunaga, the warlord who would begin the process of re-unifying Japan in the sixteenth century. The battle of Sekigahara, perhaps the most significant in Japan's history, sealed the triumph of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the warlord who completed the process of re-unification.
3. After Go-Daigo had fled Ky˘to, the Ashikaga attempted to proceed as if he had been deposed, appointing a new Emperor, K˘my˘. However, Go-Daigo had other ideas and, from his base in modern-day Nara Prefecture, proclaimed that he was still the legitimate Emperor. Thus began a period in which Japan had two rival Imperial courts. What were the two courts called?

Answer: The Northern and Southern courts

Yoshino, Go-Daigo's mountainous base in Nara, is south of Ky˘to, hence the term "Northern and Southern" to describe the two courts. The war between them dragged on for half a century, long after both Go-Daigo and Takauji were dead. By 1392, the Southern court had been worn down by the Muromachi Bakufu and agreed to re-unify with the Northern court.
4. The third Ashikaga Sh˘gun, Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, oversaw a period of peace and artistic flowering. He also re-established the long-defunct links between Japan and China. Which of the following policies did he NOT adopt in his efforts to improve relations with the new Ming Dynasty?

Answer: He contributed Japanese troops to Chinese military campaigns

When Yoshimitsu established trade links with China, Japanese swords were one of the top items that the smaller partner had to sell to the larger being then, as now, prized for their magnificent workmanship. In return for the opening of trade links, Yoshimitsu agreed to suppress the wak˘, the Japanese pirates who plagued the coasts of China and Korea. In 1404, the Ming rewarded him by recognizing him as the "King of Japan". Yoshimitsu responded by declaring himself the vassal of the Ming Emperor.

Japanese troops have certainly fought in China on a large scale, but only as enemy invaders to the best of my knowledge. Certainly the Chinese in the early fifteenth century, fresh from throwing the Mongols out of their country, were in no need of help from foreign troops.
5. The Ashikaga Sh˘guns began to rely on Constables (Shugo) to administer the provinces for them. Over time, the Shugo developed into powerful lords in their own right, becoming semi-independent in their provincial strongholds. What well-known word eventually came to describe them?

Answer: Daimyo

The word "Daimy˘" is written with the characters for "great" and "name". The "name" here refers to "name-fields" i.e. privately owned plots of land. The Shugo became powerful by acquiring large chunks of their provinces, hence "Daimy˘" is best translated as "great landowner".

These original Daimy˘, sent into the provinces by the Ashikaga, were members of great samurai families. They are sometimes called "Shugo-Daimy˘" to distinguish them from the "Sengoku-Daimy˘"; samurai from obscure and low-ranking families who took advantage of the breakdown of central government in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries to carve out provincial empires for themselves.
6. In 1467 began the ďnin War, a struggle between Shugo whose power now rivaled that of the Ashikaga. There had been similar conflicts between such warlords before, but what was different about the ďnin War?

Answer: It was fought in Ky˘to itself

The ďnin War was fought in the streets and mansions of Ky˘to, leaving the city, by 1477, a heap of ruins. Prior to this, the rivalries of the great families had been fought out in the provinces, and could be safely ignored by the Bakufu. The devastation of Ky˘to, the political and spiritual heart of the country, destroyed the Ashikaga Sh˘guns as credible rulers, and precipitated the breakdown of central authority. Japan now entered the Sengoku Period - the era of fully independent regional warlords.

Guns would not be used in Japan until 1543, when they were introduced by the Portuguese. No foreign mercenaries played a role in this or, as far as I am aware, any other civil war in Japan. The two sides in the ďnin War were the Hosokawa and Yamana families. The Hosokawa leader, Katsumoto, was not the son of his rival, Yamana S˘zen, but he was his son-in-law, having married S˘zen's daughter in an unsuccessful attempt to improve their relationship.
7. After the ďnin War, Ashikaga control collapsed and Japan entered a long era of disunity in which rival warlords competed for power. What is this period called?

Answer: Sengoku

"Sengoku" literally translates as "warring states", and thus is not really applicable to the Japan of this time, which was a single state ripped apart by internal conflict. However in this, as in much else, the Japanese borrowed a Chinese term that described an era of actual warring states on the mainland and used it to denote their period of anarchy.
8. During this period, followers of the J˘d˘-shinshű Buddhist sect began to rise up in spontaneous acts of rebellion against samurai rule. What were these movements called?

Answer: Ikk˘-Ikki

The Ikk˘-Ikki, or "single-minded leagues", established themselves as a powerful force in Japan in 1488 when they took overthrew the samurai of Kaga Province and began to rule it by themselves. Composed of peasants and monks, the Ikk˘-Ikki presented a challenge to the feuding warlords for almost a hundred years.

Rennyo was the monk who founded the Hongan temple, the spiritual center of J˘d˘-shinshű, although he was careful never to openly support his radical followers. "Yakiuchi" refers to the act of storming an enemy building and burning it down - a traditional form of rebellion in Japan. A naginata is a long pole with a curved blade, a weapon favored by Ikk˘-Ikki adherents.
9. During the period of civil war, there was a famous rivalry between two great warlords, who over the years fought five major battles on the plain of Kawanakajima. What were their names?

Answer: Uesugi Kenshin and Takeda Shingen

Kenshin, the Daimy˘ of Echigo Province, and Shingen, the Daimy˘ of Kai, were said to have enjoyed their rivalry. At the fourth battle of Kawanakajima they came face to face when Kenshin and his men stormed Shingen's headquarters. Luckily for Shingen (who was armed only with a fan), the duel was interrupted before Kenshin could get too many sword strokes in. Shingen features prominently in Kurosawa Akira's film "Kagemusha".
10. The unification of the country finally began in the mid-sixteenth century with the rise of the warlord Oda Nobunaga. Of which province was he the Daimy˘?

Answer: Owari

Making up the western half of modern-day Aichi Prefecture, Owari came under the control of the Oda clan in the days of Nobunaga's father. When Nobunaga finally established himself as its unquestioned master, by 1560, it was a small, unimportant province that unfortunately sat on the strategic route to Ky˘to for any important warlord coming from the east. In 1560 Imagawa Yoshimoto, the Daimy˘ of Suruga, marched into Owari on his way to Ky˘to and, to general surprise, was defeated and killed by Nobunaga - the first step on the young prodigy's road to power.

Mikawa was the province of Imagawa's vassal, Matsudaira Motoyasu, who would later be known as Tokugawa Ieyasu, and is arguably the most significant figure in the history of Japan. ďmi was the province of Asai Nagamasa, Nobunaga's brother-in-law, who would one day make the terrible mistake of double-crossing him.
11. Oda Nobunaga was the first of the three great unifiers of Japan. The other two, Toyotomi Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu, were both closely connected to him. How were they connected?

Answer: Hideyoshi was his vassal and Ieyasu was his ally

Hideyoshi was born in Owari province, under the power of the Oda clan. His father, though he took part in the clan's battles, had no samurai ancestry. Hideyoshi began as Nobunaga's servant and rose, thanks to his military prowess, to be his most trusted general.

Ieyasu was a samurai, the Daimy˘ of Mikawa Province. In his youth, he fell under the domination of Imagawa Yoshimoto, the powerful Daimy˘ of Suruga, and accompanied the latter when he attacked Nobunaga in 1560. After Nobunaga's defeat of Imagawa, Ieyasu and Nobunaga joined forces, with Ieyasu the junior partner. It was an alliance that served both men well, and that was never broken.
12. After Nobunaga was assassinated in 1582, Hideyoshi and Ieyasu were the obvious candidates to succeed him. Hideyoshi, in the more powerful position, suggested that Ieyasu instead relocate to the eastern provinces and take over a vast domain there. Ieyasu accepted, establishing his headquarters at a small fishing village in the east. The village was then called Edo; it is now called...

Answer: Tokyo

Hardly anyone had heard of Edo before Ieyasu relocated there in 1590. By moving to the east, however, Ieyasu was able to detach himself from the turbulence of Hideyoshi's reign and develop Edo into a powerful and effective base for his new domain; one that was ready to govern the country when Hideyoshi was dead and Ieyasu's turn came.

By the eighteenth century, under Ieyasu's descendants, Edo was the largest city in the world. It remains the heart of modern-day Japan.
13. After Nobunaga's death, Hideyoshi completed the unification of the country, and subdued or appeased all the powerful Daimy˘. How did he follow up this success?

Answer: He invaded Korea

Hideyoshi, who grew up as an illiterate peasant, was ignorant about the world outside Japan. In the 1590's, failing to appreciate the vast scale of China, he decided to follow his conquest of Japan with a further conquest of the Ming Dynasty. The Ming tributary state of Korea, as it has before and since, found itself a convenient stepping-stone between its two powerful neighbors. Hideyoshi's two attempts to seize Korea were initially successful, but soon bogged down under the Ming counterattack. After Hideyoshi's death in 1598, his generals lost little time in calling the invasion off.
14. When Hideyoshi died, his son Hideyori was still an infant. The most powerful of Hideyoshi's allies acted as regents to the young heir. Tokugawa Ieyasu, the most powerful of all, soon began to dominate and opposition to him coalesced. The two sides met in 1600 at the most significant battle in the history of Japan. What is it called?

Answer: The battle of Sekigahara

Anti-Ieyasu sentiment gathered around Hideyoshi's top bureaucrat, Ishida Mitsunari. Mitsunari was not a great general, but opposition to the Tokugawa was such that many important warriors did rally to his cause. The armies met on October 21 at Sekigahara, in modern-day Gifu Prefecture. A hard-fought battle, it was eventually won by treachery when one of Mitsunari's allies, having been persuaded beforehand by Ieyasu, changed sides and attacked his own army's rear.

Although this was not yet the end of Hideyoshi's family, the battle effectively delivered control of Japan to Ieyasu.
15. After winning the battle, Ieyasu was the master of Japan. However, he did not move to destroy Toyotomi Hideyori, Hideyoshi's son, until 1615, when he finally wiped out the remnants of the Toyotomi in their home base. Which modern-day Japanese city was the HQ of the Toyotomi?

Answer: ďsaka

In ďsaka today can be seen a replica of the great castle that Hideyoshi built there, where his unfortunate son died in 1615. Along with him died his mother Yodo, the niece of Oda Nobunaga, whose mother, father, stepfather and brother had died at the hands of the first two great unifiers of Japan. She and her son now died at the hands of the third.

This was the end of the Toyotomi, and the beginning of the rule of the Tokugawa family, which would govern Japan until 1868 - presiding over a period of peace lasting more than 250 years.
Source: Author Finduskeepus

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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