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Quiz about What Happened in  1930s edition
Quiz about What Happened in  1930s edition

What Happened in ...? (1930s edition) Quiz


We're up to the thirties, now. Good luck!

A multiple-choice quiz by john_sunseri. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
john_sunseri
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
320,451
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
2368
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 71 (10/10), buncha1956 (8/10), Guest 99 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. What happened in 1930? Arthur Conan Doyle died, Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh, Max Schmeling of Germany became the world heavyweight champion, and Grant Wood painted his dentist and his (Wood's) sister in front of a house. What was the name of this famous painting? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. What happened in 1931? The Jehovah's Witnesses were founded, Salvador Dali painted his "The Persistence of Memory" (the one with the melting clocks), "The Star-Spangled Banner" became the American national anthem, and someone went to jail for tax evasion. Who was it? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. What happened in 1932? Franklin Roosevelt mentioned something called "The New Deal" in his acceptance of the Democratic Party's nomination for President, Amelia Earhardt flew solo across the Atlantic, the positron and the neutron were discovered, and a celebrity's baby was kidnapped. Who was the celebrity? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. What happened in 1933? Construction began on the Golden Gate Bridge, Adolf Hitler became Chancellor (and dictator) of Germany, "King Kong" hit the silver screen, and George Spicer and his wife saw something strange in Scotland. What did they claim to have seen? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. What happened in 1934? Cole Porter wrote "Anything Goes", The RMS Queen Mary took her maiden voyage, Bonnie and Clyde were killed in Louisiana, and in Canada there was a very special birth. Who was born on May 28? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. What happened in 1935? Moscow opened its Metro subway system, John Steinbeck wrote "Tortilla Flat", Parker Brothers came out with a new board game called "Monopoly", and on June 10 Dr. Bob Smith had his last drink. Why was this significant? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. What happened in 1936? Jesse Owens won four gold medals at the Berlin Olympics, Boulder Dam was completed (and Lake Mead created), Edward VIII assumed the throne of England (and would abdicate later in the year), and Benito Mussolini referred to something arising from a friendship treaty his country had just signed. What was it? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. What happened in 1937? Carl Orff's "Carmina Burana" premiered in Frankfurt, Amelia Earhart disappeared over the Pacific, Operation Rügen destroyed great sections of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War, and a disaster happened near Lakehurst, New Jersey. What was this disaster? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. What happened in 1938? Orson Welles's famous broadcast of "The War of the Worlds" was heard by about six million listeners, America recalled its ambassador to Germany (and vice versa), the aurora borealis was visible as far south as Gibraltar in January, and László Bíró patented something in Paris. What was Bíró's innovation? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. What happened in 1939? The big news was Germany's invasion of Poland, but there was other stuff going on: "Gone With the Wind", "Ninotchka", "Stagecoach" and "The Wizard of Oz" were all released, John L. Lewis called for a United Mine Workers coal strike, Steinbeck won the Pulitzer for "The Grapes of Wrath", and Lothrop Withington Jr. began a fad at Harvard University. What was this fad? Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. What happened in 1930? Arthur Conan Doyle died, Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh, Max Schmeling of Germany became the world heavyweight champion, and Grant Wood painted his dentist and his (Wood's) sister in front of a house. What was the name of this famous painting?

Answer: American Gothic

Wood submitted "American Gothic" to a contest at the Art Institute of Chicago, and won $300 and a bronze medal. The painting is still there in Chicago, and has become something of a cultural touchpoint--it has been parodied by "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" (with Riff and Magenta standing in for the farmer and his companion) and in the opening sequence of the "Green Acres" television show.
2. What happened in 1931? The Jehovah's Witnesses were founded, Salvador Dali painted his "The Persistence of Memory" (the one with the melting clocks), "The Star-Spangled Banner" became the American national anthem, and someone went to jail for tax evasion. Who was it?

Answer: Al Capone

Capone was brought down by Prohibition agent Eliot Ness, who chipped away at the gangster's 'businesses' and scotched a plan by Capone to bribe a jury by bringing in a new, untouched jury to hear the mobster's income tax evasion trial. Capone was jailed in Atlanta, and then went to Alcatraz.

By the time he got out, his empire had crumbled and the man (wracked by syphilis) was a shell of his former self. He died in 1947.
3. What happened in 1932? Franklin Roosevelt mentioned something called "The New Deal" in his acceptance of the Democratic Party's nomination for President, Amelia Earhardt flew solo across the Atlantic, the positron and the neutron were discovered, and a celebrity's baby was kidnapped. Who was the celebrity?

Answer: Charles Lindbergh

Charles Augustus Lindbergh II was abducted from his home in East Amwell, New Jersey on the night of March 1, and was found near the home in May, dead of a massive fracture of the skull. Eventually a German immigrant, Bruno Hauptmann, was arrested and convicted of the crime. He was executed in 1936.
4. What happened in 1933? Construction began on the Golden Gate Bridge, Adolf Hitler became Chancellor (and dictator) of Germany, "King Kong" hit the silver screen, and George Spicer and his wife saw something strange in Scotland. What did they claim to have seen?

Answer: The Loch Ness Monster

While in their car, the Spicers saw a gigantic creature (25 feet long, with a ten-foot long neck) squirming across the road before them. It made its way to the Loch, destroying underbrush with its bulk, and then disappeared into the water. Later that year, motorcyclist Arthur Grant claimed to have almost crashed into a similar creature, and Margaret Munro thought she saw something with elephantine skin, a small head and flippers.

The "famous picture" of Nessie was taken the next year, in 1934.
5. What happened in 1934? Cole Porter wrote "Anything Goes", The RMS Queen Mary took her maiden voyage, Bonnie and Clyde were killed in Louisiana, and in Canada there was a very special birth. Who was born on May 28?

Answer: The Dionne Quintuplets

Yvonne, Annette, Cécile, Émilie and Marie Dionne were the first set of quintuplets to survive their infancies. They became a national sensation, and the Ontario government stepped in to promote their curiosity value--the quints were taken from their parents and moved into a specially-built hospital built across from their farm, in order to assure their survival.

The hospital also had a playground area so that tourists could watch the children play.
6. What happened in 1935? Moscow opened its Metro subway system, John Steinbeck wrote "Tortilla Flat", Parker Brothers came out with a new board game called "Monopoly", and on June 10 Dr. Bob Smith had his last drink. Why was this significant?

Answer: The beginning of Alcoholics Anonymous

By 1937, AA had helped 40 people stay sober, and 100 by 1939 (including one woman). By 2001, membership in the program was estimated at 2 million people worldwide. Smith and Bill Wilson (a former soldier, stock speculator and fellow alcoholic) were responsible for the birth of the organization, and they chose the date of Smith's last alcoholic drink to mark the anniversary of AA.
7. What happened in 1936? Jesse Owens won four gold medals at the Berlin Olympics, Boulder Dam was completed (and Lake Mead created), Edward VIII assumed the throne of England (and would abdicate later in the year), and Benito Mussolini referred to something arising from a friendship treaty his country had just signed. What was it?

Answer: A Rome-Berlin Axis

Germany had backed Italy's play in Abyssinia when the League of Nations had condemned it, so Hitler and Mussolini approved an alliance between the two countries, which would expand to include Japan, Hungary, Romania and Slovakia (in 1940), and Bulgaria (in 1941). Collectively, these were the Axis Powers.
8. What happened in 1937? Carl Orff's "Carmina Burana" premiered in Frankfurt, Amelia Earhart disappeared over the Pacific, Operation Rügen destroyed great sections of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War, and a disaster happened near Lakehurst, New Jersey. What was this disaster?

Answer: The Hindenburg fire

Herbert Morrison, a reporter for Chicago's WLS, provided the voice for the tragedy, and his "Oh, the humanity!" has become famous. 36 people died in the fire, the implosions and the crash, including 13 passengers and one member of the ground crew. A picture of the burning airship was used by the band Led Zeppelin for the cover to its first album.
9. What happened in 1938? Orson Welles's famous broadcast of "The War of the Worlds" was heard by about six million listeners, America recalled its ambassador to Germany (and vice versa), the aurora borealis was visible as far south as Gibraltar in January, and László Bíró patented something in Paris. What was Bíró's innovation?

Answer: The ballpoint pen

Bíró, a Hungarian, also patented the invention of the ballpoint (or biro) in London and, in 1940, in Argentina (he was fleeing the Nazis). In 1979, Papermate released their erasable ballpoint (the Erasermate), and in the early '80s the rollerball pen (which uses water-based ink rather than oil-based) came along.
10. What happened in 1939? The big news was Germany's invasion of Poland, but there was other stuff going on: "Gone With the Wind", "Ninotchka", "Stagecoach" and "The Wizard of Oz" were all released, John L. Lewis called for a United Mine Workers coal strike, Steinbeck won the Pulitzer for "The Grapes of Wrath", and Lothrop Withington Jr. began a fad at Harvard University. What was this fad?

Answer: Goldfish swallowing

Withington swallowed a live goldfish as a campaign stunt (he was running for class president), and reporters happened to be present when he did it. Soon, high-schoolers and college men around America were enjoying do-it-yourself sushi.

Phonebooth stuffing began in the '50s in South Africa, streaking goes back as far as 1804 (and was endorsed by Robert E. Lee for young men at Washington and Lee University) and Coed Naked Water Polo, as far as I can find, never caught on.
Source: Author john_sunseri

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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