Quiz about Medicinal Fruits
Quiz about Medicinal Fruits

Medicinal Fruits Trivia Quiz


Fruits are not only delicious to consume, but many of them have been used over the centuries in the field of alternative medicines as well. Here are ten of them for you to work out.

A photo quiz by Creedy. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
Creedy
Time
4 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
358,994
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
2163
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 86 (4/10), Guest 66 (8/10), Fiona112233 (7/10).
1. This fruit is quite amazing. Native to the Mediterranean and Indian regions of the world, it has been used for thousand of years for a wide range of treatments. The first part of the word sounds as though it's related to an apple. What is it? Hint

Tomato
Peach
Passionfruit
Pomegranate

photo quiz
2. This is an interesting fruit we don't seem to hear much about in the western world. In Australia anyhow. The higher the altitude in which it grows, the sweeter its taste. Colds, sore throats and coughs in particular have long been treated by its consumption. What is this almost talkative fruit? Hint

Loquat
Pear
Plum
Apple

photo quiz
3. Because this delicious fruit is less allergenic than most other fruits, it is one of the first foods to be introduced as a solid food for babies. Which one is it? Hint

Pear
Apple
Peach
Mango

photo quiz
4. Greatly overlooked, this fruit which is native to temperate areas of the world, has been thoroughly investigated since the onset of the 21st century for its potentially powerful medicinal qualities. With a first syllable sounding as though it's related to a donkey, and a second syllable that's quite sharp, can you guess what it is?

Answer: (One Word)
photo quiz
5. This fruit, which looks similar to a pear, produces an exquisite pale pink flower before bearing the fruit. It has been studied for some years for its possible medicinal qualities. What is it? Hint

Choko
Quince
Plantain
Apple

photo quiz
6. Astonishingly so, the fruit that grows on this, its pictured tree, is slightly radioactive. What is it? Hint

Custard Apple
Banana
PawPaw
Coconut

photo quiz
7. This fruit pongs to high heaven and has been banned from many tourist buildings, but it is excellent for bringing down a high fever. What is its name? Hint

Derian
Darian
Durian
Dorian

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8. This fruit has long been used in many countries as a natural contraceptive. What is its name? Hint

Durian
Papaya
Nectarine
Plantain

photo quiz
9. Preliminary research indicates that consumption of this fruit may be beneficial in the treatment of hypertension. Can you name it? Hint

Watermelon
Red Pawpaw
Rockmelon
Ground Apple

photo quiz
10. This just has to be the fruit from THAT tree in the Garden of Eden. It can be very good for you, but also for some people, can have quite the opposite effect. What is it? Hint

Strawberry
Mulberry
Loganberry
Raspberry

photo quiz

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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This fruit is quite amazing. Native to the Mediterranean and Indian regions of the world, it has been used for thousand of years for a wide range of treatments. The first part of the word sounds as though it's related to an apple. What is it?

Answer: Pomegranate

References to this amazing fruit can found in written works going back as far as the Babylonian age, the Bible and Ancient Greece. It was used in the preparation of a vast array of foods, and its fruit and bark used to treat illnesses such as dysentery, diarrhoea, nosebleeds, diseased gums, in the treatment of haemorrhoids, and even as an eyedrop to counteract the effects of cataracts. Women used it as a skin toner, to firm up muscles and as a contraceptive.

This fruit is packed full of vitamin C, B5, potassium, phenols and antioxidants. Research in today's laboratories indicate that products from the pomegranate may be effective in reducing heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, prostrate cancer, various viral infections, dental plaque and several mood disorders. Research still continues in these areas with trials carried out on obligatory little mice, but indications seem promising indeed. Now we just have to wait until governments whack a huge tax on the growing of pomegranates in the family garden.
2. This is an interesting fruit we don't seem to hear much about in the western world. In Australia anyhow. The higher the altitude in which it grows, the sweeter its taste. Colds, sore throats and coughs in particular have long been treated by its consumption. What is this almost talkative fruit?

Answer: Loquat

The loquat is native to China. More than 1,000 years ago it spread to Japan as well, and from there to the Middle East, India and Africa. Chinese people who moved to live in Hawaii introduced the use of the fruit in that country as well. The higher up it is planted above sea level, the sweeter the taste of the fruit becomes, and the reverse is true.

It is high in vitamin A, fibre, potassium and manganese, can be eaten as it comes off the bough, or in jams, jellies, churneys and wines. Don't drink too much of that though, as consumption in large amounts can bring about cyanide poisoning.

In Japan, as well as its use in the treatment of various lung conditions, extracts from the plant are use to treat skin conditions such as psoriasis and eczema. Finally, because of the excellent quality of the tree's wood, this can be used to plant living fences, or treated to make strong, lovely, durable furniture. What a champion.
3. Because this delicious fruit is less allergenic than most other fruits, it is one of the first foods to be introduced as a solid food for babies. Which one is it?

Answer: Pear

The pear is another amazing fruit that can be used in many ways. Its flowers are exquisite when in blossom, the fruit is nourishing, perfect for allergy sufferers, it acts as a great laxative and is packed full of fibre and vitamin C. Because the wood of the tree doesn't warp, it has been used in the manufacture of a wide range of goods.

These include woodwind musical instruments, furniture, wood carvings, kitchen utensils, implements such as t-squares, set squares, rulers, and violin and guitar bodies.

It can also be utilised for the smoking process used to cure various meats and tobacco. Interestingly, before tobacco was introduced to Europe, pear tree leaves were smoked instead. That can't be too medicinal at all! Historically, people in Ancient Greece ate pears to cure bouts of nausea. Possibly after smoking pear leaves!
4. Greatly overlooked, this fruit which is native to temperate areas of the world, has been thoroughly investigated since the onset of the 21st century for its potentially powerful medicinal qualities. With a first syllable sounding as though it's related to a donkey, and a second syllable that's quite sharp, can you guess what it is?

Answer: Hawthorn

Hawthorn trees are native to the northern European areas of the world, but have gradually spread outwards from there over time. They have a small fruit and rather thorny branches. The fruit itself is called a haw. Haw-haw, no prizes for figuring out from where the thorn part of the name comes. The tree provides nourishment and a haven for birds, mammals and insects, particularly butterflies. The fruit can be eaten raw, or made into various jams, jellies, candy and wines. If the leaves are picked while still very new on the branch, they can be used in salads. Long used in traditional and herbal medicines, scientific studies of the plant reveal that it can be used to treat chronic heart illnesses, and in reducing blood pressure, fatigue, and breathlessness. Too much however can cause rapid heart rate, nausea and sleepiness - so don't try treating yourself. See a medical person.

An old tale surrounding the hawthorn was that the crown of thorns used in the crucifixion of Jesus Christ was made from the hawthorn, and that, in France, the tree is said to groan and cry on Good Fridays as a result. The Irish believed the hawthorn could mend a broken heart, Serbs and Croats believe the wood is deadly to vampires. Given the deluge of boring and bloodthirsty vampire movies and television shows doing the rounds for years, perhaps we should all plant a hawthorn in our gardens to halt production of same.
5. This fruit, which looks similar to a pear, produces an exquisite pale pink flower before bearing the fruit. It has been studied for some years for its possible medicinal qualities. What is it?

Answer: Quince

The quince is native to the Middle East but can survive quite comfortably in much cooler climates as well. It is said to be one of the possible suspects from the original tree in the Garden of Eden. In Ancient Greece, it was offered as part of the traditional marriage gifts during wedding ceremonies, as it was believed the fruit was a gift bestowed on mankind by the goddess Aphrodite. Brides were advised to chomp into one before entering the bedroom on the first night of their marriage in order for their breath to smell sweet and appealing. One presumes the happy bridegroom thought he smelled fine whichever way he came.

The fruit has rather a strong flavour when eaten raw, but is very pleasant in jams, a type of tea, jellies and, of course, the obligatory wine. I swear mankind could find a way to make wine out of horse dung. Medicinally, this fruit has been used for very many centuries as a treatment for pneumonia and severe coughs.

This medicine was made by soaking the seeds in water for a certain period of time until the a soft fluid was produced.

This was then sipped as a cough medicine.
6. Astonishingly so, the fruit that grows on this, its pictured tree, is slightly radioactive. What is it?

Answer: Banana

Most fruits are slightly radioactive, but the banana is more so than the rest. This is because it is rich in potassium which contains a radioactive isotope. This fruit is native to the south-east Asia region of the world, and was first grown on a planned basis in Papua and New Guinea. The banana is not only delicious both straight from the tree, or in various forms of cooking and drinks, but it can be diced and dried out into banana chips as well - if you're feeling like breaking off any of your teeth, that is. The leaves are used as plates in various cultures, or wrapped around foods and cooked together with it, or even fashioned into small cups. Quite amazing really. A type of fibre textile can also be produced from these leaves, used to make various forms of clothing and mats and other household goods, and even paper! What a miraculous plant.

Bananas contain vitamin B6, fibre, potassium, manganese, and vitamin C. Their consumption has long been associated with a reduced rate of colorectal, kidney and breast cancers and they can boost the production of dopamine in people with a low production of same. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that basically makes us feel good about ourselves. It is also used to help reduce some effects of Parkinson's illness. Wow, this is utterly amazing! Banana peel, reduced to a powdered form, can reduce up to 65% of some pollutants in river systems as well. Astonishing.
7. This fruit pongs to high heaven and has been banned from many tourist buildings, but it is excellent for bringing down a high fever. What is its name?

Answer: Durian

The durian is a large fruit native to southeast Asia. It has a thickish husk that's covered in thorns. Even before cutting it open, the smell is unpleasant, but when the fruit is opened up, the smell is said to resemble a cross between dirty socks and untreated sewage.

Some people however rather like this smell. Obviously their olfactory receptors are deadened. It apparently tastes delicious however. Pong aside, this fruit is packed full of vitamin C, potassium, proteins, and energy giving properties. Medically, a juice made from its leaves and roots have been used for centuries to bring down high fevers. Goodness me, the Javanese people believe that the durian is a powerful aphrodisiac.

They must eat the fruit to increase one's temperature, then drink the juice to cool off afterwards.

A naughty saying in Indonesia along these lines goes that when the durian falls, the sarong comes up. The Indonesians believe that if you're hit on the head with a durian, and providing you survive this hefty thorn-filled blow, you will have good luck afterwards. That's a lovely self-fulfilling prophecy if ever there was one.
8. This fruit has long been used in many countries as a natural contraceptive. What is its name?

Answer: Papaya

Native to the southern parts of the Americas, the pawpaw or papaya was first grown in an organised fashion in Mexico. It has a soft flesh when ripe, and it too doesn't have a particularly alluring smell when opened up. Nothing like the durian though. It just smells faintly like fresh vomit.

It's a bit of a miracle fruit however. Its leaves and bark can be utilised to make rope, and the flesh is chocker block full of goodness. This includes vitamin C, folate, fibre, powerful phytochemicals, and many others.

It can be eaten raw or cooked, and its leaves and buds, while still tender and young, can be cooked and eaten as well, the poor little things. A paste made from the pawpaw can be used as a conditioner for the hair, and a lovely soothing ointment made from this fruit is used to treat rashes, burns and insect bites.

The seeds can be ground up and used as a pepper substitute, and a liquid formed from boiling the leaves has long been used in the treatment of malaria. Finally, women in southeast Asia have been using a papaya concoction for centuries as a natural contraception.

This is interesting: medical research indicates that this fruit's seeds act as a form of contraception for male monkeys as well.
9. Preliminary research indicates that consumption of this fruit may be beneficial in the treatment of hypertension. Can you name it?

Answer: Watermelon

Watermelon is believed to have originally come from the southern areas of Africa, and this yummy fruit has spread to the rest of the world from there. Basically this fruit is almost all water, so is considered an ideal thirst quencher on hot summer's days.

The portions that aren't water however are packed full of vitamin C. Oddly enough, the rind of the watermelon contains more nourishment and nutrient than the flesh of the fruit, but the idea of munching into that is decidedly unappealing. It can be cooked though, used in stew and pickles, and in stir-fry dishes. With the latter, this is usually cooked with garlic, olive oil, chili, scallions, sugar and rum. Oh Lord, I wouldn't know whether to have an intense attack of heartburn or start singing sea shanties. Watermelon wine is also manufactured from this plant, but why ruin the taste of a delicious fruit in this matter? Medically, apart from the nourishment it provides, watermelon is a great diuretic, it contains enormous amounts of carotenoids, and lypocene. Research indicates this lip-smacking fruit may also be very effective in the treatment of hypertension.
10. This just has to be the fruit from THAT tree in the Garden of Eden. It can be very good for you, but also for some people, can have quite the opposite effect. What is it?

Answer: Strawberry

Strawberries were first found in France, but now can be found in all corners of the globe. This treat, considered quite delicious by many, was used as far back as the 1300s as a treatment to alleviate depression. How fascinating is that? Many different dishes can be made from the little strawberry, including wine of course.

The fruit can be eaten as it is, or perhaps with a light sprinkling of sugar to ease its sometimes zesty taste. Now you're going to be astonished with the curative powers of the strawberry which follow: Apart from its use as an anti-depressive, this little miracle shows great promise in the treatment of Alzheimer's illness, and kidney failure resulting from diabetes.

It's full of Vitamin C, fisetin, flavanoids, folate, antioxidant qualities, and potassium, while, at the same time, is low in sodium, cholesterol, and saturated fat. Oddly enough though, some people, including this quiz writer, really dislike the taste of this pretty little fruit, and it does have the capacity to cause allergic reactions, dermatitis, hay fever and some breathing problems in others. Listen to what your body is saying.

It will almost always tell you what to eat and what to avoid. If your strawberry alarm clock goes off, then avoid it.
Source: Author Creedy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
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