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Quiz about Peanuts
Quiz about Peanuts

Peanuts! Trivia Quiz


Are peanuts the answer to everything? Test your mixed nut knowledge with this quiz and hope you don't leave with peanuts. Have fun! :)

A multiple-choice quiz by malik24. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
malik24
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
337,615
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
726
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 107 (6/10), Guest 100 (7/10), Guest 149 (1/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Are you nuts for nuts?
On a fruit and nut cake, four unlikely nuts have been sprinkled atop its spongy goodness. But, whilst the cake is not a lie, one of these nuts is, according to the resident botanist.
Tell me, which of them are not really nuts by botanical definition? If in doubt, pay heed to the way the nuts are encased in their shells.
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Walking in the supermarket, I see a jar of Nutella. It's a spread, and despite the fact it looks like a chocolate spread from a passing glance, it's really a nut which is a more prominent ingredient, although not as high in quantity as the sugar and vegetable oils used!

Which nuts do they use in the creation of Nutella?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Are you a nutter? A nut gatherer, that is. Sometimes it's good to go to the source of where nuts really originate. This particularly hard shelled nut isn't native to Hawaii, despite the fact it is commercially grown there.

In fact, it's native to Australia. Can you identify the nut from this list?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Hurray, we're off to bake a wedding cake for the happy couple. We have most of the ingredients, but ... we're missing the nuts used to create the marzipan icing. In a nutshell, marzipan is made primarily of sugar and certain ground nuts, with variants including egg whites, corn syrup and rosewater.

To save the day from disaster, which nuts are used in the creation of marzipan?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Squirrels know the good nuts from the bad, although to be fair they are not particularly picky. However, we as humans are not squirrels, and wouldn't necessarily know off hand if we were out gathering.

Can you sort the good from the bad and tell me which of these nuts is NOT fit for human consumption in an unprocessed state, due to the caustic resin urushiol - the same as poison ivy's - within its shells?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. I scream for ice cream. We all scream for ice cream. Except the lactose intolerant, perhaps, but there are alternatives for them, so we can all be happy. Which of these nuts often used as an addition to ice cream is harvested from a desert tree and was produced in the greatest quantity in Iran in 2005? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. An intrepid explorer is searching through age old untouched ruins. Through booby traps he has endured, puzzles he has solved. Surely he is near some buried treasure? He proceeds to find... Several wrinkled nuts on an indented stand, arranged in a certain pattern. They spell the word DOOM. Without sensing the obvious descending from above, the explorer exclaims whilst cracking a nut open: "Ah, yes, this nut is native to Persia, of course! And, it hasn't even gone off... its antioxidants aren't that effective, so it can't have been here long!". Sadly, he is crushed by a stereotypical falling ceiling.
Which of these punny phrases best describes his situation and the nuts which spelt doom?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. One of these nuts is guilty of murder! After eating one, a victim suffered an anaphylactic shock, which turned out to be fatal. An expert believes this nut is one of the leading causers of fatalities or near-fatalities in the nut world, and is also known as arachis hypogaea.

Can you arrest the right nut and close the case?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. As a woman waves off her lover from a balcony, Romeo and Juliet style, she appears sorrowful at her lover leaving. To stave these feelings, she starts eating some chocolate and some aptly named nuts, which are also known in some cases for leaving a non-dangerous but irritating metallic lingering taste which lasts for up to 2 weeks after ingesting them. Which nuts are these? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. A perhaps less well known nut is also known as the Philippine nut, and the Philippines is one of the only countries that produces this nut commercially. The kernel is a major ingredient in the Chinese delicacy moon cake, and its tree is tropical and can not withstand cold at all. Which nut is this? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Are you nuts for nuts? On a fruit and nut cake, four unlikely nuts have been sprinkled atop its spongy goodness. But, whilst the cake is not a lie, one of these nuts is, according to the resident botanist. Tell me, which of them are not really nuts by botanical definition? If in doubt, pay heed to the way the nuts are encased in their shells.

Answer: Peanuts

What defines a nut, botanically speaking? Well, a nut is a dry fruit, a seed (usually one) which is attached to a hard shell (pericarp) internally, originating from the ovary of the nut. The seed remains connected with this wall, which does not open at maturity. Many nuts are not botanically defined as nuts at all! Pine nuts, pistachios and cashews are classed as seeds, whereas coconuts and almonds are considered as drupes. Culinarily speaking, however, these are all classed as nuts.

The main distinction a drupe has from a nut is that the fruit is multi-layered around the seed. Take coconut, for example, the hard shell derived from the ovary wall is not the only layer: coconuts have a hard inner layer surrounding the shell, a thick fibrous middle layer, and an outer husk. The outer layer of drupes is also likely to crack open at some point, particularly in 'dry' drupes, which coconut is.

Peanuts are not, botanically speaking, true nuts, and are actually classed as legumes. Peanuts flower above ground, but are pushed down to develop in pods underground, and some say they are closer to peas than nuts. Typically, peanuts are used in cuisine, however other uses such as cosmetics and dyes are present. They are high in protein, about 25%, more than any true nut, and have been shown to have antioxidant properties.
2. Walking in the supermarket, I see a jar of Nutella. It's a spread, and despite the fact it looks like a chocolate spread from a passing glance, it's really a nut which is a more prominent ingredient, although not as high in quantity as the sugar and vegetable oils used! Which nuts do they use in the creation of Nutella?

Answer: Hazelnuts

Hazelnuts are spherical/oval nuts are produced by the hazel with a seed covered in a hard shell. Botanically speaking, they are true nuts (unlike the peanut!), so we won't be seeing a name change to 'Drupella' or such. They are high in fat, with approximately 60.5% fat content, and are often used in confectionery.

Approximately 13% of each bottle of Nutella is hazelnut paste, against roughly 7.4% fat reduced cocoa. Sugar and vegetable oils have an even greater share, however, and over 50 grams per hundred of a jar is sugar! This product was marketed in 1963 by Ferrero. However, the original concept was based on an Italian product called Gianduja - with half being a paste comprised of 50% almonds and 50% hazelnuts, and the rest being chocolate, made as an answer to the taxes on cocoa beans at the time.
3. Are you a nutter? A nut gatherer, that is. Sometimes it's good to go to the source of where nuts really originate. This particularly hard shelled nut isn't native to Hawaii, despite the fact it is commercially grown there. In fact, it's native to Australia. Can you identify the nut from this list?

Answer: Macadamia

The macadamia nut is indeed native to Australia, though it has been exported for planting in other countries, particularly Hawaii, and was discovered in 1828 in Southern Queensland by British botanist and explorer Alan Cunningham.
Its shell is very hard, but can be cracked with a blunt instrument or a nutcracker. It has the highest amount of unsaturated fat in any known nut, and is poisonous to dogs. It can be eaten raw, or roasted, and goes well in stuffings, fruit salads, or just as a tasty snack.
4. Hurray, we're off to bake a wedding cake for the happy couple. We have most of the ingredients, but ... we're missing the nuts used to create the marzipan icing. In a nutshell, marzipan is made primarily of sugar and certain ground nuts, with variants including egg whites, corn syrup and rosewater. To save the day from disaster, which nuts are used in the creation of marzipan?

Answer: Almonds

Marzipan is made out of ground almond and sugar, and egg whites or corn syrup, and it is sometimes flavoured with rosewater, a by-product of distilling rose petals. Almonds are drupes, and are native to the Middle East and South Asia. They are low in saturated fat, and are a good source of magnesium, calcium, fibre, phosphorus, potassium, manganese, iron, protein and Vitamin E. Almonds have been suggested to help against coronary heart disease and diabetes, and may help lower cholesterol.

And, it's the almonds that give marzipan its distinct flavour. Sweet or bitter almonds can be used, although bitter almonds contain cyanide, albeit in very minute quantities, which can be removed by roasting the nuts. The bitterness is caused by Amygdalin (sometimes called Vitamin B17), specifically.
5. Squirrels know the good nuts from the bad, although to be fair they are not particularly picky. However, we as humans are not squirrels, and wouldn't necessarily know off hand if we were out gathering. Can you sort the good from the bad and tell me which of these nuts is NOT fit for human consumption in an unprocessed state, due to the caustic resin urushiol - the same as poison ivy's - within its shells?

Answer: Cashews

Cashew nuts are native to South America, coastal Brazil specifically, and grow on the end of cashew apples, edible but fragile fruits which makes them unsuitable for transport. Cashews are always sold pre-shelled due to their caustic resin named urushiol (the same as in poison ivy!) within the shell. This resin is typically removed through steaming before being sold to consumers, yet can be roasted off as well. It is corrosive and gloves should be used if one wants to open wild cashew shells. This resin can be used by industries to make varnishes and insecticides. And, for anyone concerned, squirrels are resistant to urushiol.

Cashews contain a lower amount of fat than most other nuts, and about 75% of this fat is oleic acid - also found in olive oil - which is said to promote good cardiovascular health, particularly for those with diabetes. Health-promoting minerals such as iron, copper and magnesium, are also present. It is possible to have a cashew allergy, and concerns should be discussed with a doctor or allergy specialist. Examples of how they can be eaten include consumption with other nuts and fruit, as a snack, or cooked with Thai cuisine, such as Thai Green curry.
6. I scream for ice cream. We all scream for ice cream. Except the lactose intolerant, perhaps, but there are alternatives for them, so we can all be happy. Which of these nuts often used as an addition to ice cream is harvested from a desert tree and was produced in the greatest quantity in Iran in 2005?

Answer: Pistachio

Pistachio ice cream is slightly green when home-made, owing to the green flesh on the nuts. Commercially, food colouring is often added to make the colour appear more like mint ice-cream, yet this colour intensity would not come naturally.

A pistachio is a drupe contained in a fairly hard shell, and should be stored in a cool, dry area away from sunlight, or it will spoil more quickly. Pistachio trees take 6-10 years to create any significant amount of nuts at all, and 15 years to reach peak production. Ripe pistachio nutshells will split, and whilst unsplit pistachios are edible, their taste may not be as palatable.

According to Red Rock Ranch Pistachio Orchard's website, 20% of their pistachios will not contain nut meat in the rinsing process and are discarded, and 30% of the remaining nuts are unsplit and thus are unripe, and they claim not to sell these, (although, it is not rare to see shelled pistachios amongst unshelled pistachios in shops, so this practice may not be upheld by all). Therefore it is indicated there is a fair amount of waste in commercial harvesting of these nuts.
7. An intrepid explorer is searching through age old untouched ruins. Through booby traps he has endured, puzzles he has solved. Surely he is near some buried treasure? He proceeds to find... Several wrinkled nuts on an indented stand, arranged in a certain pattern. They spell the word DOOM. Without sensing the obvious descending from above, the explorer exclaims whilst cracking a nut open: "Ah, yes, this nut is native to Persia, of course! And, it hasn't even gone off... its antioxidants aren't that effective, so it can't have been here long!". Sadly, he is crushed by a stereotypical falling ceiling. Which of these punny phrases best describes his situation and the nuts which spelt doom?

Answer: The writing was on the walnuts

Walnuts are known for their wrinkled shell and wrinkled kernels. Their name derives from the old English wealhhnutu, meaning foreign nut. Walnuts are a good source of antioxidants, the best of any commonly eaten nuts, and these antioxidants may protect the body from free radicals, said to cause cancer, cardiovascular disease and some neurological diseases. Whilst its skin is somewhat bitter, there are nutritional benefits to eating it, as the skin contains most of the nut's phenols. The walnut shells can be used for cleaning and polishing, paint thickener and even as a filler in dynamite.

'The writing was on the wall' is an idiom which suggests a rather negative occurrence will take place for an individual or group, and originates in the Bible. It is said that King Belshazzar of Babylon blasphemed by worshipping other gods, and an omen - which only Daniel was able to decipher - spelt imminent doom for their kingdom. The King supposedly died that same night.
8. One of these nuts is guilty of murder! After eating one, a victim suffered an anaphylactic shock, which turned out to be fatal. An expert believes this nut is one of the leading causers of fatalities or near-fatalities in the nut world, and is also known as arachis hypogaea. Can you arrest the right nut and close the case?

Answer: Peanut

Peanut is a type of groundnut, and other groundnuts include specific roots and tubers. Arachis hypogaea is the specific name of this species. Anaphylactic shock is an extreme allergic reaction which has a fatality rate of up to 1%, causing around 1500 deaths per year in the U.S.
Other foods such as eggs and shellfish can also trigger anaphylactic shocks, however antibiotics and certain insect bites are also culprits.

Common symptoms include red blotchy skin due to blood vessels dilating, air passages constricting thus restricting breathing, and the heart, brain and lungs may suffer a large drop in oxygen supply. Epinephrine injectors (adrenaline) are provided to those at risk, and the adrenaline improves airways and blood pressure, which may be life saving. If you're not sure whether you are at risk for anaphylaxis or not, see a doctor. However, in general, severe allergic reactions in the past may be a marker for this condition.
9. As a woman waves off her lover from a balcony, Romeo and Juliet style, she appears sorrowful at her lover leaving. To stave these feelings, she starts eating some chocolate and some aptly named nuts, which are also known in some cases for leaving a non-dangerous but irritating metallic lingering taste which lasts for up to 2 weeks after ingesting them. Which nuts are these?

Answer: Pine nuts

Pine nuts come from pine trees (and has nothing to do with pining in the lost love sense), which are a member of the Pinaceae family. Pines typically grow in alpine areas, although if it is too cold, the pine cones will denature. Specifically, pine cones yield the edible pine nuts, however shelled pine nuts will spoil due to their high oil content if not stored in a cool area and in a (preferably) airtight container.

Pine mouth is the official name for the metallic lingering taste that is said to be in a minority of pine nuts cultivated in China, however this taste will leave from a few days up to 2 weeks after ingestion and does not appear to have any other ill health effects. Pine nuts are also known for their high protein content, around 31 grams per 100, as well as their appetite suppressing qualities and high concentration of oleic acids, known for their cardiovascular benefits. They're a common ingredient in pesto, but also in other meat, vegetable and fish dishes.
10. A perhaps less well known nut is also known as the Philippine nut, and the Philippines is one of the only countries that produces this nut commercially. The kernel is a major ingredient in the Chinese delicacy moon cake, and its tree is tropical and can not withstand cold at all. Which nut is this?

Answer: Pili nut

Pili nuts are native to Malesia. The Philippines, the principal producer of pili trees, lie in this region. Specifically, Bicol, one of the 17 regions of the Philippines, creates over 80% of the exported pili nuts. Coconuts also grow in similar conditions to pili trees, and have some similarities. For example, when ripe, the pili fruit, a drupe, has a shiny black skin with a yellowy/green fibrous pulp, and the seed is protected by a hard shell. These three layers can also loosely be observed in coconuts.

The kernel tastes like roasted pumpkin seed when raw, and when roasted, its nutty flavour and tender crispy texture has been said to be superior to the almond. In addition to moon cake, chocolate, ice cream and other baked goods use the pili nuts' kernels. However, the shells can be used for fuel and crafts, the pulp can be cooked, eaten - it is said to have a similar consistency to avocado - or fed to pigs. The oil is useful for cooking with, or for making cosmetics and insect repellents. None of the pili fruit needs go to waste.
Source: Author malik24

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
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