Quiz about All You Need is Anger
Quiz about All You Need is Anger

All You Need is Anger Trivia Quiz


How many of these idiomatic expressions related to anger can you recognise?

A photo quiz by looney_tunes. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
looney_tunes
Time
3 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
357,988
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
3634
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 98 (9/10), Guest 175 (9/10), Guest 172 (6/10).
photo quiz
1. What organ, part of the lymphatic system, might you be said to vent when you express your anger about something? Hint

Pancreas
Duodenum
Kidney
Spleen

photo quiz
2. In Australian idiom, an angry person might be said to be as mad as what reptile? Hint

Lizard
Snake
Salamander
Gecko

photo quiz
3. When you are angered by someone's actions, you might say that you want to pick what bodily part? Hint

Head
Ear
Nose
Bone

photo quiz
4. What might a resident of the United Kingdom who is angry be said to want to do with the instrument pictured? Hint

Wave it
Polish it
Swing it
Grind it

photo quiz
5. Someone who is extremely angry is sometimes said to be foaming at what bodily orifice? Hint

Nose
Mouth
Ear
Eye

photo quiz
6. What part of a building such as the one shown here might you be said to go through if you lose your temper? Hint

Door
Roof
Window
Wall

photo quiz
7. This woman is wearing quite a noticeable collar. What collar-related sensation might she be said to have if she were to feel enraged about something? Hint

Sore around the collar
Wet behind the collar
Chilly above the collar
Hot under the collar

photo quiz
8. What anger-related phrase is suggested by this image? Hint

Spit chips
Spit the dummy
Blow a gasket
Up in arms

photo quiz
9. In British idiom, someone who is feeling angry with the world may be said to be acting like a bear with a sore body part. Which of these is it? Hint

Paw
Tooth
Tail
Head

photo quiz
10. What colour is commonly associated with anger? If you're irritated enough, you'll be seeing it! Hint

Black
Green
Blue
Red


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. What organ, part of the lymphatic system, might you be said to vent when you express your anger about something?

Answer: Spleen

To vent one's spleen means to express anger, usually by shouting, rather than leaving it pent up inside. The Greek "four-humour" classification of emotions associated the spleen with black bile, and melancholy. This has evolved from just describing a morose temperament to being associated with the expressions of anger such a disposition often produces.
2. In Australian idiom, an angry person might be said to be as mad as what reptile?

Answer: Snake

The expression "mad as a snake" presumably has its origins in the aggressive attacks made by Australia's snakes on early settlers who often disturbed the snakes while clearing land. The fact that so many native species are venomous made their behaviour all the more intimidating, so it's a good idea to avoid being too close to someone who is as mad as a snake.

More recently, the expression has evolved to be "mad as a cut snake" - if they get angry when just disturbed, imagine their fury if you accidentally injured one!
3. When you are angered by someone's actions, you might say that you want to pick what bodily part?

Answer: Bone

"I've got a bone to pick with you" is an ominous start to the conversation, especially if the encounter was meant to be a social occasion such as a family reunion (which is the kind of event where the long-suppressed feelings of anger that might lead to the confrontation do often surface).

This opening may be followed by putting a flea in their ear, and getting right up their nose, until they lose their head and it's on for young and old.
4. What might a resident of the United Kingdom who is angry be said to want to do with the instrument pictured?

Answer: Grind it

The image shows a block splitter, which is a kind of axe. When you have an axe to grind, in British usage, you are upset about something, and want to get it sorted out. In American usage, the phrase is also used to mean that your behaviour has an ulterior motive. Used in that sense, the phrase is attributed to Benjamin Franklin.

It then seems to have crossed the Atlantic and gained a slightly different meaning.
5. Someone who is extremely angry is sometimes said to be foaming at what bodily orifice?

Answer: Mouth

The phrase "foaming at the mouth" raises images of rabid dogs, whose symptoms often include excessive salivation that may appear to produce foam around the mouth. Since their bites are extremely dangerous, it is best to stay well away from them. If a person is foaming at the mouth in anger, it is probably a good idea to steer clear until things settle down.
6. What part of a building such as the one shown here might you be said to go through if you lose your temper?

Answer: Roof

The phrase suggests a state of agitation so strong that wild gesticulation could lead to a damaged ceiling. When the price of a commodity increases rapidly, it is also said to go through the roof. When the cost of petrol went up by thirty cents a litre between the morning when I didn't have time to buy it and the evening when I stopped to refuel, I went through the roof about the fact that the price had gone through the roof.
7. This woman is wearing quite a noticeable collar. What collar-related sensation might she be said to have if she were to feel enraged about something?

Answer: Hot under the collar

The presumed origin of this idiom is that anger often leads to increased blood flow, and a sense of warmth in body parts. If you're wearing a tight collar, the sensation around your neck might be particularly noticeable. Another description for your state of mind might be hot and bothered.
8. What anger-related phrase is suggested by this image?

Answer: Spit the dummy

While all of these phrases can be used to describe various states of anger, someone whose anger leads them to act irrationally, like a child throwing a temper tantrum, is often said to have spit the dummy (especially in Australia). The phrase often carries a suggestion that their behaviour was unjustified, or at least an overreaction to the situation. They might also be said to be throwing a hissy fit, or having a cow.

One has to wonder how the dummy in the image ended up hanging from a tree - possible the result of a spectacular dummy-spit?
9. In British idiom, someone who is feeling angry with the world may be said to be acting like a bear with a sore body part. Which of these is it?

Answer: Head

If you are like a bear with a sore head, you are in a grumpy mood, and likely to snap at those around you for reasons that wouldn't ordinarily be irritating enough to merit that response. I haven't been able to find a definitive reason why the sore head is particularly appropriate - I would think that a bear with any sore body part would be grumpy, and well avoided.

It is possible that the expression may be intended to combine the known touchiness of bears with that of someone experiencing a hangover and associated headache.
10. What colour is commonly associated with anger? If you're irritated enough, you'll be seeing it!

Answer: Red

Someone who is extremely angry might be said to be seeing red. The increased blood pressure associated with a state of intense anger often leads to a reddening of the face, along with the adoption of a fixed glare. This characteristic appearance of anger could be the source of the expression.

Another, more imaginative origin, has also been proposed. It may be a reference to the use of a red cape to anger the bull during a bullfight. The fact that bulls don't actually see the colour, and are simply responding to its motion, doesn't detract from the possible derivation. Another anger-related phrase that refers to bullfighting is saying that something is "like a red rag to a bull", first used by Charlotte Mary Yonge in "The Pillars of the House", published in 1873.
Source: Author looney_tunes

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor LadyCaitriona before going online.
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