FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Eponymous Locales
Quiz about Eponymous Locales

Eponymous Locales Trivia Quiz


Certain words in the English language are derived from the names of countries, cities, and places, some of which are no longer extant. See how much you know about them. Good Luck!

A multiple-choice quiz by jouen58. Estimated time: 5 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Humanities Trivia
  6. »
  7. Etymology
  8. »
  9. Eponyms (Words from Names)

Author
jouen58
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
163,464
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
8536
Awards
Editor's Choice
Last 3 plays: parrotman2006 (6/10), jxhsutt (3/10), Guest 212 (7/10).
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. This word has several meanings; it describes certain designs or patterns which use interlacing lines and, in some cases, floral and animal motifs. It also describes a position in ballet in which the dancer stands "en pointe" on one foot and raises the other perpendicularly behind her. It can also describe a type of short, elaborate musical composition (especially for piano or other solo instrument) or a style of writing. It is of French origin, but is derived from the name of a prominent Middle Eastern country. Which is it? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. This word describes someone who lives entirely for pleasure and is derived from the name of an ancient Greek city which was destroyed in 510 B.C. The city was famous for its luxury and opulence. Which word is it? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Which of these fabrics does NOT derive its name from a place or country? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Each of these paleontological/geological terms is derived from a place name. One of them, however, is something of a double eponym, since the place in question is itself named after a person; specifically, after a 17th century theologian, teacher, and hymnist who lived (and died) in the valley where a number of Stone-Age fossils were found. Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. A type of radioactive metallic element, a stately dance popular in the 18th - 19th centuries, and an elaborate overdress worn by fashionable ladies of the aristocracy in the 18th century all derive their name from this Eastern-European country. Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. This word describes a type of fabric, as well as a type of cat. It also forms part of the screen name of an eminent FT quizmaster. It derives from the name of a quarter in Baghdad. Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. If you are in a listless or depressed state, you are said to be in this area, which is in the ocean near the equator. Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. A crass, uncultured person preoccupied with material things and devoid of transcendental values may be called by this name, which derives from an ancient Middle-Eastern civilization. Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Artemis, the Greek goddess of the moon (and of the hunt) was also called by this popular feminine name which derives from the mountain in Delos where, according to tradition, she was born. Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. One of these elements is named for a European country, another is named for a European city, a third is named for a group of European countries. Which one is NOT named after a place in Europe? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Feb 24 2024 : parrotman2006: 6/10
Feb 21 2024 : jxhsutt: 3/10
Feb 15 2024 : Guest 212: 7/10
Feb 11 2024 : Guest 93: 4/10
Feb 06 2024 : Maggiebella: 9/10
Feb 05 2024 : comark2000: 6/10
Feb 02 2024 : Guest 73: 8/10
Feb 02 2024 : mulder100: 5/10
Jan 10 2024 : sieska: 6/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This word has several meanings; it describes certain designs or patterns which use interlacing lines and, in some cases, floral and animal motifs. It also describes a position in ballet in which the dancer stands "en pointe" on one foot and raises the other perpendicularly behind her. It can also describe a type of short, elaborate musical composition (especially for piano or other solo instrument) or a style of writing. It is of French origin, but is derived from the name of a prominent Middle Eastern country. Which is it?

Answer: arabesque

This term derives from the elaborate interlacing designs which are a prominent feature of the art and architecture of Arabia (some of these are similar to Celtic ornamentation of the kind found in the Book of Kells), as well as of other Middle Eastern countries.

The curvelinear lines of the arms and legs in the ballet position known as "arabesque" were apparently also thought to be suggestive of the Orient. In music, the arabesque is a short, ornate, rather whimsical composition (similar to a bagatelle), usually for piano; some notable examples are by Schumann and Debussy.

In literature, the term generally applies to an intricate, fanciful, and grandiloquent style of writing (Edgar Allen Poe's 2 volume collection of stories, published in 1839, was entitled "Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque").
2. This word describes someone who lives entirely for pleasure and is derived from the name of an ancient Greek city which was destroyed in 510 B.C. The city was famous for its luxury and opulence. Which word is it?

Answer: sybarite

Sybaris was a city on the Gulf of Tarentum; the land was once known for its extraordinary fertility and the city became proverbial in Greece for the lavishness and sumptuousness of its quality of life. Alas, it was destroyed and razed during a war with the nearby rival city of Crotona, after which the conquering Crotoniats diverted the waters of the nearby river Crathis to flow over the ruins of the once glorious city.
3. Which of these fabrics does NOT derive its name from a place or country?

Answer: gingham

Gingham derives its name from the Malaysian word "genggang", meaning a checkered fabric. Calico, a type of cotton fabric usually with a printed figural pattern, derives its name from the city of Calicut in India from which such fabrics were imported. The word cashmere is also of Indian derivation; the fabric is made from the wool of the Kashmir goat, which in turn is named for its place of origin. Damask, a type of silk, satin, or linen fabric featuring a flat pattern made by cross-weaving the fabric, derives its name from the Syrian city of Damascus.
4. Each of these paleontological/geological terms is derived from a place name. One of them, however, is something of a double eponym, since the place in question is itself named after a person; specifically, after a 17th century theologian, teacher, and hymnist who lived (and died) in the valley where a number of Stone-Age fossils were found.

Answer: Neanderthal

Joachim Neander (1650 - 1680) was a school teacher and rector of the Reformed church in Dusseldorf (the family name was originally Neumann before its alteration to the Greek Neander by Joachim's grandfather). He spent much time in contemplation in the nearby Dussel valley, with its flowing river, and composed many hymns, of which the best known is "Lobet den Herren, den Machtigen" ("Praise to the Lord, the Almighty").

His Pietist leanings earned him the disapprobation of the established church, and led to his dismissal as schoolteacher.

In May of 1680, at the age of 30, he was found dead in a cave in the valley, probably of phthisis. The valley was named after him in the early 19th century and gained greater notoriety in 1856, when the skeletal remains of what is now known as Neanderthal man were found in the valley. The term "Jurassic" is an Anglicization of the French word "Jurassique", which derives from the Jura mountain range, a part of the Alpine system which borders Switzerland and part of France.

The fossil-rich limestone deposits in this area have helped define the "Jurassic period" in paleontology. The Permian period, the sixth and last period of the Paleozoic era, was named after the Russian city of Perm, near the Ural mountains. The Cambrian period, also a part of the Paleozoic era, derives its name from Cambria, the old Latin name for Wales, where fossils characteristic of this period were first discovered.
5. A type of radioactive metallic element, a stately dance popular in the 18th - 19th centuries, and an elaborate overdress worn by fashionable ladies of the aristocracy in the 18th century all derive their name from this Eastern-European country.

Answer: Poland

Polonium (symbol Po) was the first element discovered by the Polish-born scientist Marie Curie; it was discovered in the summer of 1898 and is named for the country of her birth. She discovered radium a few months later; sadly, it was probably prolonged exposure to radium that eventually caused her death from leukemia in 1934.

In fashion, a polonaise was an elaborate one-piece waistcoat and overskirt, worn over a draped underskirt; it enjoyed great popularity in 18th century Europe. The word polonaise also describes a rather stately dance of Polish origin, as well as the music which accompanied such a dance, or a concert piece of similar style. Chopin's many polonaises (notably the "Military" Polonaise in A major and the ever-popular A flat major Polonaise, which enjoyed additional fame as the Tin-Pan Alley ballad "'Til the End of Time") are probably the best known, though there are also famous examples by the Russian composers Tchaikovsky (in his opera "Eugene Onegin") and Mussorgsky (in the "Polish Act" of his opera "Boris Goudinov").
6. This word describes a type of fabric, as well as a type of cat. It also forms part of the screen name of an eminent FT quizmaster. It derives from the name of a quarter in Baghdad.

Answer: Tabby

Tabby describes any fabric with a simple basket weave pattern, particularly a type of watered silk or taffetta which was originally produced in the Attabi quarter of Baghdad. The term has also been used to describe the irregularly striped or mottled pattern found on the fur of most domestic and mongrel cats, as well as the cats themselves (it does not, however, refer to a particular breed of cat).

It is commonly used in reference to female cats, though tabby markings are found in both genders and all cats are, to some extent, genetically predisposed to such markings.

In slang usage, female gossips have been variously called "tabbies", "pussies", or simply "cats". The QM alluded to above is, of course, Tabby Tom (who, incidentally, is neither female, nor irregularly striped nor, so far as I know, a gossip).
7. If you are in a listless or depressed state, you are said to be in this area, which is in the ocean near the equator.

Answer: The Doldrums

The doldrums form a sort of belt slightly north of the equator, where the intense heat and rising humidity, along with the comparably light winds, results in wild shifts in the weather and ocean conditions. These can include violent thunderstorms, squalls, and hurricanes; however, the area has achieved eponymous fame as a result of the contrasting windless, deadly calm periods, which have been known to trap seafaring vessels for seemingly endless stretches of time.
8. A crass, uncultured person preoccupied with material things and devoid of transcendental values may be called by this name, which derives from an ancient Middle-Eastern civilization.

Answer: philistine

Ancient Philistia was actually a pentapolis which comprised the cities of Ashkelon, Ashdod, Ekron, Gath, and Gaza. The Philistines were the ancient enemies of the Israelites and are condemned throughout the Old Testament for their ungodly and uncivilized ways and their numerous transgressions against the God of Israel. Clashes between the Philistines and the Israelites generate some of the most memorable stories in the Old Testament, most notably the battle between David and Goliath and the tragic love story of Samson and Delilah.
9. Artemis, the Greek goddess of the moon (and of the hunt) was also called by this popular feminine name which derives from the mountain in Delos where, according to tradition, she was born.

Answer: Cynthia

Artemis (Diana to the Romans) was the daughter of Zeus and Leto and the twin sister of Apollo. According to tradition, she was born under Mount Cynthos and was thus alternately known as Cynthia, as well as Delia (after Delos).
10. One of these elements is named for a European country, another is named for a European city, a third is named for a group of European countries. Which one is NOT named after a place in Europe?

Answer: samarium (Sm)

Samarium, a magnetic metallic element, was discovered in 1879 by the French scientist Lecoq de Boisbaudran. It is a component of the mineral samarskite, from which it takes its name (samarskite, in turn, was named after a Russian mine official, Col. Samarski). Ruthenia is a transition metal; it was discovered in Russia by scientist G.W. Osann at the University of Tartu around 1827.

It was named ruthenium in honor of the country in which it was discovered (Ruthenia is an ancient Latin name for Russia). Scandium is a soft, silvery metallic element discovered in 1879 by the Swedish scientist Lars Nilsson and named for Scandinavia, where the minerals thortveitile and wiikite (in which scandium principally occurs) are abundant. Lutetium, like scandium, is a rare-earth metallic element; it was discovered in Paris in 1907 by Georges Urbain.

The name is derived from Lutetia (or Lutecia) the ancient Latin name for the city of Paris.
Source: Author jouen58

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor fringe before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
2/26/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us