FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Eponymous Noblemen
Quiz about Eponymous Noblemen

Eponymous Noblemen Trivia Quiz


Many things are named after their discoverers or inventors. If these were British noblemen, the name that's used may be the title, not the surname. Can you work out the titles of the following nobs who have left their mark on the language?

A multiple-choice quiz by TabbyTom. Estimated time: 5 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Humanities Trivia
  6. »
  7. Etymology
  8. »
  9. Eponyms (Words from Names)

Author
TabbyTom
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
148,091
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
3761
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: loriannie (4/10), cinnam0n (8/10), cdecrj (8/10).
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. Anthony Cary was a 5th Viscount who became Treasurer of the Royal Navy. In 1690 Captain John Strong, R. N., made the first known landing on a group of islands in the South Atlantic and claimed them for the Crown. The sound between the islands was named after Cary; and the name was later applied to the archipelago as a whole. So Cary's title was Viscount ____________? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Another nobleman with naval connections was John Montagu, a 4th Earl who was First Lord of the Admiralty from 1748 to 1751, from 1763 to 1765 and from 1771 to 1782. He is popularly remembered for his addiction to gambling. It is said that, rather than leave the gaming tables to eat, he would get servants to bring him snacks that he could eat while he played. What was the title of Montagu's earldom? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Edward Stanley was a 12th Earl with a great interest in the turf. England's greatest classic horse race, first run in 1780, is named after him, so what was the title of his earldom?

Answer: (One Word (5 letters))
Question 4 of 10
4. Thomas Bruce was a 7th Earl, diplomat and art connoisseur. In 1799 he was appointed as His Majesty's Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary at the Sublime Porte in Constantinople. While he was there he acquired certain sculptures from the Parthenon in Athens and arranged for them to be transported to Britain. What was Bruce's earldom? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Arthur Wellesley was a younger son of an Irish Earl who rose to become a Field-Marshal and a Duke. His first successful campaigns were in India, and he is best remembered for his role in the Napoleonic wars, which culminated in a victory at a place to the south of Brussels. He has given his name to a boot: what was his dukedom? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Fitzroy James Henry Somerset was an army officer. He first saw service in the Napoleonic wars, where he lost his sword arm. He then spent many years at the War Office, becoming Master-General of the Ordnance. In 1852 he was made a peer, and in 1854 he was made a Field-Marshal and put in command of a force that was sent to the Crimea. He gave his name to an overcoat without shoulder-seams, having sleeves that extend to the neck. What was the title of the barony that he took in 1852? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. James Thomas Brudenell was a 7th Earl. Like the previous man, he was a soldier who served in the Crimea, where he led a famous charge. He gave his name to a knitted woollen jacket with buttons. What was his earldom? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. John Sholto Douglas was a 9th Marquess who is remembered for drawing up a code of rules for boxing. What was his marquisate? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Hugh Cecil Lowther was a 5th Earl who also had an interest in boxing. He instituted the award of a belt for outstanding boxers. What was his earldom? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Charles Anderson Worsley was a 2nd Earl who was fond of a game of whist. He used to offer to bet 1,000 to 1 against anyone holding a hand with no card higher than a nine. Such a hand was therefore called after him: what was his earldom? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Dec 09 2023 : loriannie: 4/10
Dec 05 2023 : cinnam0n: 8/10
Dec 05 2023 : cdecrj: 8/10
Dec 04 2023 : antarctican: 8/10
Dec 02 2023 : Buddy1: 10/10
Nov 11 2023 : SueLane: 9/10
Nov 10 2023 : Guest 31: 10/10
Nov 04 2023 : donkeehote: 8/10
Oct 29 2023 : Guest 136: 7/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Anthony Cary was a 5th Viscount who became Treasurer of the Royal Navy. In 1690 Captain John Strong, R. N., made the first known landing on a group of islands in the South Atlantic and claimed them for the Crown. The sound between the islands was named after Cary; and the name was later applied to the archipelago as a whole. So Cary's title was Viscount ____________?

Answer: Falkland

The first verifiable sighting of these islands was by a Dutch navigator in 1600. The islands were uninhabited when Strong landed, but the British didn't stay. It was French explorers, mainly from Saint-Malo, who first made a serious attempt at settlement: they named the islands "Les Īles Malouines" after their home port, and this is the origin of the Spanish name Malvinas. Sovereignty was the subject of disagreements between Britain, France, Spain and later the newly independent republic of Argentina: the dispute flared up memorably in 1982.
2. Another nobleman with naval connections was John Montagu, a 4th Earl who was First Lord of the Admiralty from 1748 to 1751, from 1763 to 1765 and from 1771 to 1782. He is popularly remembered for his addiction to gambling. It is said that, rather than leave the gaming tables to eat, he would get servants to bring him snacks that he could eat while he played. What was the title of Montagu's earldom?

Answer: Sandwich

The Earl, it is said, would eat slices of meat between rounds of bread at the gaming table, and snacks of this kind came to be known as sandwiches. In his early spell at the Admiralty he seems to have been determined to run the department efficiently and to root out abuses, but his third term there was a period of almost unparalleled ineptitude and corruption.

He did, however, see to it that Captain Cook's vessels were well fitted out, and it was for him that Cook named the Sandwich Islands (i.e. Hawaii).
3. Edward Stanley was a 12th Earl with a great interest in the turf. England's greatest classic horse race, first run in 1780, is named after him, so what was the title of his earldom?

Answer: Derby

Lord Derby had an estate near Epsom called The Oaks, and he gave this name to a race for 3-year-old fillies which he established in 1779. After the first Oaks, he and his friends conceived the idea of a similar race for both colts and fillies. Legend has it that Derby and his friend Sir Charles Bunbury tossed a coin to decide whose name should be given to the race, and Derby won.

When the race was run for the first time in 1780, Bunbury had his revenge: his colt Diomed became the first Derby winner.
4. Thomas Bruce was a 7th Earl, diplomat and art connoisseur. In 1799 he was appointed as His Majesty's Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary at the Sublime Porte in Constantinople. While he was there he acquired certain sculptures from the Parthenon in Athens and arranged for them to be transported to Britain. What was Bruce's earldom?

Answer: Elgin

Bruce was 7th Earl of Elgin and 11th Earl of Kincardine. His acquisition of what we now call the Elgin marbles was controversial, even at the time. There were grounds for believing that he got them not by straightforward purchase but by bribery. Though he originally wanted them for himself, he fell on hard times and had to offer them to the British government, who paid £35,000 for them in 1816. Since Greece gained independence from the Turks in the 1820s, the marbles (housed in the British Museum) have been a bone of contention between the Greek and British authorities.
5. Arthur Wellesley was a younger son of an Irish Earl who rose to become a Field-Marshal and a Duke. His first successful campaigns were in India, and he is best remembered for his role in the Napoleonic wars, which culminated in a victory at a place to the south of Brussels. He has given his name to a boot: what was his dukedom?

Answer: Wellington

Today, a Wellington boot is a knee-length waterproof rubber boot, worn in wet or muddy conditions. But the original nineteenth-century Wellington was a fashionable high leather boot, reaching above the knee at the front and cut away behind. There are quizzes about the Duke by deadmeat and bpykh.
6. Fitzroy James Henry Somerset was an army officer. He first saw service in the Napoleonic wars, where he lost his sword arm. He then spent many years at the War Office, becoming Master-General of the Ordnance. In 1852 he was made a peer, and in 1854 he was made a Field-Marshal and put in command of a force that was sent to the Crimea. He gave his name to an overcoat without shoulder-seams, having sleeves that extend to the neck. What was the title of the barony that he took in 1852?

Answer: Raglan

Raglan was successful at the battles of Alma and Inkerman, but he is chiefly remembered for giving the misunderstood order for the disastrous charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava, and is usually blamed for the failure of the commissariat in the winter of 1854 - 55. He died shortly before the siege of Sebastopol.
7. James Thomas Brudenell was a 7th Earl. Like the previous man, he was a soldier who served in the Crimea, where he led a famous charge. He gave his name to a knitted woollen jacket with buttons. What was his earldom?

Answer: Cardigan

Accounts of Cardigan show him to have been an unpleasant fellow in many ways, but nobody can doubt his courage. George Macdonald Fraser makes him an important character in his novel "Flashman at the Charge."
8. John Sholto Douglas was a 9th Marquess who is remembered for drawing up a code of rules for boxing. What was his marquisate?

Answer: Queensberry

The Queensberry rules were intended to govern boxing with gloves, which was superseding the old bare-knuckle code.
9. Hugh Cecil Lowther was a 5th Earl who also had an interest in boxing. He instituted the award of a belt for outstanding boxers. What was his earldom?

Answer: Lonsdale

A Lonsdale belt was originally presented by the Earl, as President of the National Sporting Club, to the champion in each British weight division: a champion who successfully defended his title twice could keep the belt. Today, the belts are presented by the British Boxing Board of Control, and to keep a belt a boxer must defend it three times. Belts were originally made of gold: today they are of gold-plated silver.
10. Charles Anderson Worsley was a 2nd Earl who was fond of a game of whist. He used to offer to bet 1,000 to 1 against anyone holding a hand with no card higher than a nine. Such a hand was therefore called after him: what was his earldom?

Answer: Yarborough

If the Earl could find enough takers, he ought to have done well out of his bet: the odds against a yarborough are about 1,827 to 1.
Source: Author TabbyTom

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor agony before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
12/10/2023, Copyright 2023 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us