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Quiz about People Who Became Words  2
Quiz about People Who Became Words  2

People Who Became Words - 2 Trivia Quiz


Some more questions featuring eponyms - persons whose names became words in the English language.

A multiple-choice quiz by deepakmr. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
deepakmr
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
293,410
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
3087
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 212 (9/10), Dizart (10/10), RedRobin7 (8/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. William Archibald Spooner was a professor after whom a term 'spoonerism' was named. Which of the following is an example of spoonerism? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. A silhouette is a view of an object consisting an outline and a featureless interior. The word is derived from the name of Etienne de Silhouette; who was he? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. A popular facial hairstyle was named after Ambrose Burnside. What was the name of this hairstyle? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. The word Quisling is used to refer to a traitor. Who was the man Quisling from whose name this word is derived? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The term 'Achilles heel' is named after a Greek mythological character named Achilles. Which of the following best describes the meaning of this term? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The word 'casanova' is derived from the name of a person called Giacomo Casanova. He was a fictional character who was a womanizer and libertine.


Question 7 of 10
7. Mikhail Kalashnikov was a Russian who is famous in history for having invented the object named after him. What was this object? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Charles Lynch was an American revolutionary from whose name the word 'lynch' is derived. What does this word mean? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. The word 'Machiavellian' is derived from the name of Niccolo Machiavelli. Who was he? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The word 'hooligan' is used to refer to a thug. The word is derived from the name of a Irish person/persons.



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Feb 15 2024 : Guest 212: 9/10
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Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. William Archibald Spooner was a professor after whom a term 'spoonerism' was named. Which of the following is an example of spoonerism?

Answer: It is kisstomary to cuss the bride

William Archibald Spooner (1844-1930) was the warden of New College, Oxford who used to get his words in a tangle. He would switch consonants or vowels unintentionally, which would lead to hilarious statements. An example being 'It is kisstomary to cuss the bride' instead of 'It is customary to kiss the bride'.

The statement 'He is the very pineapple of politeness' is an example for malapropism; here the word pineapple is used instead of pinnacle. 'She sells sea shells by the sea shore' is an example of a tongue twister and the "Round the rugged rock ..."is an example for both alliteration and tongue twister.
2. A silhouette is a view of an object consisting an outline and a featureless interior. The word is derived from the name of Etienne de Silhouette; who was he?

Answer: A French finance minister

Etienne de Silhouette was the finance minister of King Louis XV in 1759, who imposed such harsh economic demands on the people of France that people started equating his name with anything done very cheaply. A silhouette was an inexpensive portrait that had only the person's profile in black.
3. A popular facial hairstyle was named after Ambrose Burnside. What was the name of this hairstyle?

Answer: Sideburns

Ambrose Everett Burnside (1824-1881) was an American General in the Civil war. He had a unique facial hair style, where strips of hair in front of his ears were joined to his moustache. This style was named initially as burnsides after the General. Later on it was renamed as Sideburn. This hair style can be connected with a moustache (eg : Burnside) or without (eg : Elvis).
4. The word Quisling is used to refer to a traitor. Who was the man Quisling from whose name this word is derived?

Answer: He was Minister President of Norway

Vidkun Quisling (1887-1945) was a Norwegian politician. He was the founder of the 'Nasjonal Samling' party and he supported Nazi Germany during the Second World War. He was named as Minister President of Norway by the Nazis. The word quisling is thus used to refer to a traitor, some one who betrays his own country/side by collaborating with the enemies. On the conclusion of the war, he was executed after being convicted of treason.
5. The term 'Achilles heel' is named after a Greek mythological character named Achilles. Which of the following best describes the meaning of this term?

Answer: A weakness

Achilles was a Greek mythological character who appeared in the Trojan War. According to legend, his mother had dipped him (as a child) in special waters which made him invulnerable. But one part was left out, the heel by which she held him. As a result the heel was his weakness and he was killed in the war by an arrow at his heel.

The term 'Achilles heel' is used to refer to a weakness, weak area or vulnerable spot.
6. The word 'casanova' is derived from the name of a person called Giacomo Casanova. He was a fictional character who was a womanizer and libertine.

Answer: False

Gian Giacomo Girolamo Casanova was not a fictional character. Casanova (1725-1798) was an adventurer and writer in Venice. He was known as a womanizer and a master in the art of seduction. The word Casanova which means 'a womanizer' is derived from his name. Don Juan was a fictional character who was also a womanizer and libertine.

The word 'Don Juan' is thus used to refer to a 'womanizer'. The only difference in the two words is that Don Juan was a fictional character whereas Casanova was a real person.
7. Mikhail Kalashnikov was a Russian who is famous in history for having invented the object named after him. What was this object?

Answer: AK-47 gun

Mikhail Kalashnikov (born 1919) was a Russian tank commander injured in the Second World War. During his recuperation from injury, he started work on developing a submachine gun, which later was improvised to become AK-47 (Avtomat Kalashnikova model 1947).

The AK-47 gun has become a popular weapon of terrorists. Mikhail Kalashnikov reportedly said that he was sad that the weapon was used by terrorists and that he would rather have invented something useful to farmers like a lawnmower.
8. Charles Lynch was an American revolutionary from whose name the word 'lynch' is derived. What does this word mean?

Answer: Extrajudicial punishment

Charles Lynch (1736-1796) was a planter in Virginia and an American revolutionary. He reportedly had his own court where he punished loyalist supporters. The word 'lynch' refers to 'hanging or punishment meted out by a mob which is extrajudicial in nature'. Lynching was popular in the United States where mobs would take the law into their own hands by usually hanging a suspected criminal without a trial. Lynching was also used by the Ku Klax Klan to kill their victims. Even though lynching is banned by law, there are some instances reported even in the 21st century in some places.
9. The word 'Machiavellian' is derived from the name of Niccolo Machiavelli. Who was he?

Answer: An Italian politician

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527) was an Italian politician, diplomat and writer. He was a Secretary of the Republic of Florence. He was known for his political treatises. His best known work was 'The Prince' where he outlines his political philosophies. The word 'Machiavellian' is used to denote a political strategy that is devious or cunning.
10. The word 'hooligan' is used to refer to a thug. The word is derived from the name of a Irish person/persons.

Answer: True

The word hooligan refers to a thug, hoodlum or ruffian. This word is reportedly derived from the name of one Patrick Hooligan who was a small-time thief. Several sources indicate that the word may have been named after an Irish family name called Hoolihan or Hooligan. One of the first persons to use this word in a literary work was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who used the word in a Sherlock Holmes story called 'The Adventure of the Six Napoleons'.
Source: Author deepakmr

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