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Quiz about You say Tomato
Quiz about You say Tomato

You say Tomato . . . Trivia Quiz


Are you bilingual? Each answer in this quiz is two-fold - you must chose the pair of words which answer the definition (the correct pair mean exactly the same thing) - one from each side of the Atlantic!

A multiple-choice quiz by ArleneRimmer. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
ArleneRimmer
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
95,343
Updated
Jun 15 23
# Qns
25
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
20 / 25
Plays
16064
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: PJKing (15/25), kevv342 (20/25), Kankurette (24/25).
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Question 1 of 25
1. These are made of elastic material and are worn over the shoulders. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 2 of 25
2. This is an invention which helps people move from floor to floor in a tall building. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 3 of 25
3. This is an area to the side of a road upon which people walk. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 4 of 25
4. This is when humans are waiting in an orderly fashion. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 5 of 25
5. This is a road which allows for fast movement of traffic, but what is it called in the US and UK? Hint


Question 6 of 25
6. This is a protective, and absorbent, piece of clothing used for babies' bottoms in both the US and UK, but what names does it go by in those countries? Hint


Question 7 of 25
7. This is a sweet food made with gelatine which can be served on its own or with something else. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 8 of 25
8. What would you call the device which, when operated, allows the free flow of water, in the US and the UK? Hint


Question 9 of 25
9. This is a covered walkway or entrance along one or more walls on the outside of a building. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 10 of 25
10. This is part of a car - things may be kept in here for safe-keeping or transport. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 11 of 25
11. This is the part of a car which covers the engine. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 12 of 25
12. These are an item of clothing that covers all or most of the legs. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 13 of 25
13. This is a piece of equipment issued to the police. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 14 of 25
14. If you wanted to relieve yourself you would go to the same place in both the US and the UK, but with different names. What names are these? Hint


Question 15 of 25
15. This is an item of clothing worn to be seen and is often highly coloured / colored; it has no sleeves. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 16 of 25
16. This is a product made from flour, sugar and fat; they are generally flat in appearance. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 17 of 25
17. This is an acted story of an hour and a half or longer which is often seen in cinemas but can also be purchased on video tape or DVD and watched at home. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 18 of 25
18. This is a season of the year, but goes by a different name in the US and UK. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 19 of 25
19. This is the identification of a road vehicle which can be seen by everyone as it is displayed on both front and back. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 20 of 25
20. This is a person who advises clients on matters of law, draws up legal documents and may represent their client in a lower court of law. He or she is often the first 'port of call' for a member of the public who wishes to take a case to court. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 21 of 25
21. This is an entertainment shown on television, and could last anything from five minutes to a couple of hours; it could be of a drama content. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 22 of 25
22. This snack is made of thinly sliced, deep fried potatoes. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 23 of 25
23. This is a shopping area in the US and UK. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 24 of 25
24. This is the man who visits all good children every Christmas Eve with presents, but known differently in the US and UK - which names are these nations' favourites where this man is concerned? What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint


Question 25 of 25
25. This is a small, pin-backed label worn usually on the clothing; it would display a picture or a slogan or the like, often politically-themed. What word is used in the USA / in the UK? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jun 11 2024 : PJKing: 15/25
Jun 03 2024 : kevv342: 20/25
May 29 2024 : Kankurette: 24/25
May 21 2024 : HumblePie7: 19/25
May 18 2024 : Devmac: 21/25
May 11 2024 : doncaijoe: 18/25
May 08 2024 : bruins1956: 20/25
May 07 2024 : demurechicky: 22/25
May 07 2024 : genoveva: 22/25

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. These are made of elastic material and are worn over the shoulders. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: suspenders / braces

'Braces' is also the word for the device used by dentists to straighten teeth.
2. This is an invention which helps people move from floor to floor in a tall building. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: elevator / lift

Well - 'lift' and 'elevate' do mean the same thing! While it could be an escalator, that word refers to the same thing in both countries, so is not a difference between the two.
3. This is an area to the side of a road upon which people walk. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: sidewalk / pavement

Basically a paved area at the side of the street for people to walk on - it is usually slightly higher than the road itself.
4. This is when humans are waiting in an orderly fashion. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: line / queue

A group of people may 'form a queue', 'get in line', join a 'queuing system', 'cut in line' or 'jump the queue' - to name just a few variations of this.
5. This is a road which allows for fast movement of traffic, but what is it called in the US and UK?

Answer: freeway / motorway

This fast road was first built in Germany, and there it is called an 'autobahn'.
6. This is a protective, and absorbent, piece of clothing used for babies' bottoms in both the US and UK, but what names does it go by in those countries?

Answer: diaper / nappy

Whether these are terry towelling or disposable, both words cover all types of 'rear end protection for babies'! The word 'napkin' is sometimes used in Britain as well.
7. This is a sweet food made with gelatine which can be served on its own or with something else. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: jello / jelly

Jello (US) and Jelly (UK) are the words used to describe this - a fruit-flavoured clear desert set with gelatine. Jelly (US) and Jam (US and UK) describes a preserve, sometimes containing fruit, which has been boiled with sugar until the mixture sets - this is not usually eaten on its own.

The word 'preserve' is sometimes used to describe this, but it is far more often called 'jam' or 'jelly'.
8. What would you call the device which, when operated, allows the free flow of water, in the US and the UK?

Answer: faucet / tap

In the US both 'faucet' and 'spigot' are used, but in the UK only 'tap' is used.
9. This is a covered walkway or entrance along one or more walls on the outside of a building. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: porch / veranda

In Britain a 'porch' is a small enclosed area built around the front door, usually only large enough to keep a few plants in pots. A 'veranda' is a much larger covered walkway, usually open on the side away from the house, which runs around the house or on one side of the house. Like the word 'bungalow', 'veranda' comes from India and was borrowed from that country in the late Victorian era. 'Porch' is commonly used to refer to both situations in the U.S. (although in some parts the term veranda is also used, just to make life difficult).

The alternative spelling of verandah is also used.
10. This is part of a car - things may be kept in here for safe-keeping or transport. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: trunk / boot

In Britain a 'trunk' is a large packing case or an elephant's nose, and in both countries a 'boot' is also a form of footwear.
11. This is the part of a car which covers the engine. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: hood / bonnet

A 'bonnet' is also a type of hat, generally associated with Easter festivities. A 'hood' is the head covering which is usually attached to a coat, and in the US it describes a type of criminal.
12. These are an item of clothing that covers all or most of the legs. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: pants / trousers

American references to 'pants' often has amusing undertones in the UK! 'Pants' are underwear, especially for children, but for all genders and ages in Britain.
13. This is a piece of equipment issued to the police. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: nightstick / truncheon

As carried by policemen on both sides of the Atlantic! The word 'truncheon' is being used less and less in the UK as they are now issued with retractable truncheons called asps.
14. If you wanted to relieve yourself you would go to the same place in both the US and the UK, but with different names. What names are these?

Answer: bathroom / toilet

In the UK this room is only called a 'bathroom' if it contains a bath or a shower; if the room does not have either of these, it is a 'toilet'. The word 'john' is also used, but this is an American word, not English. There are reams of words used on both sides of the pond for this room - bog, little room, loo, head, dunny, restroom - etc. You may be interested in another of my quizzes, 'The Littlest Room', which is about toilets in general.
15. This is an item of clothing worn to be seen and is often highly coloured / colored; it has no sleeves. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: vest / waistcoat

In Britain a vest is a garment worn directly next to the skin, under the shirt, jumper or similar. The American (and Australian) 'vest' is the English 'waistcoat'.
16. This is a product made from flour, sugar and fat; they are generally flat in appearance. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: cookies / biscuits

These come in various types, but are generally similar to each other. In the UK one would be offered biscuits with a cup of tea or coffee. (Mind you, my cakes fit the description as well!)
17. This is an acted story of an hour and a half or longer which is often seen in cinemas but can also be purchased on video tape or DVD and watched at home. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: movie / film

As with a lot of American words, 'movie' is finding its way into English English, but the word 'film' is still by far the more popular in the UK.
18. This is a season of the year, but goes by a different name in the US and UK. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: fall / autumn

One can see the logic behind the choice of 'Fall' for the season when the trees lose their leaves, but in the UK the word 'Autumn' is here to stay! I understand that 'Autumn' is sometimes used in America, especially in more formal situations, but by far the more popular term is 'Fall'.
19. This is the identification of a road vehicle which can be seen by everyone as it is displayed on both front and back. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: license plate / number plate

These two phrases appear to be interchangeable on both sides of the Atlantic, but generally speaking the Americans use the phrase 'license plate' and the British the phrase 'number plate' to describe the plate containing the identification number (registration number) on both ends of a road vehicle. (In the UK 'license' is spelt 'licence')
20. This is a person who advises clients on matters of law, draws up legal documents and may represent their client in a lower court of law. He or she is often the first 'port of call' for a member of the public who wishes to take a case to court. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: lawyer / solicitor

There is a tendency to use the word 'lawyer' more and more in the UK, but technically speaking, 'solicitor' is correct given the description in the question, even though the word actually derives from the Old English word 'lauier' and has always been used as a general encompassing term for the legal profession in Britain. I think the reason for its return to everyday use lies with countless American shows (programmes) and movies (films) being shown in this country.

A Barrister is able to represent a client in the higher courts, and a QC is a Queen's Counsel (a title only used when the sovereign is female, otherwise it is a KC - King's Counsel); both of these are British terms.
21. This is an entertainment shown on television, and could last anything from five minutes to a couple of hours; it could be of a drama content. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: show / programme

In the UK a 'show' is something that is watched in a theatre - such as a variety show. In America the word is used to encompass all entertainments put on public television.

The spelling 'program' in England is used only for computer programs - with the 'me' at the end it is used to describe television programmes and also the printed material sold/given at theatres to describe the performance and actors.
22. This snack is made of thinly sliced, deep fried potatoes. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: chips / crisps

These are called 'potato chips' in America and 'potato crisps' in Britain, and eaten as a snack (confectionery). Potatoes which are cut into strips and deep fried and served with fish, burgers or any other meals, are called 'fries' in America and 'chips' in the UK (where fish and chips is a national favourite); these are not a confectionery.
23. This is a shopping area in the US and UK. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: mall / precinct

Sometimes the shopping area would be called the town centre in the UK, but the equivalent of the American 'mall' would be a 'precinct'.
24. This is the man who visits all good children every Christmas Eve with presents, but known differently in the US and UK - which names are these nations' favourites where this man is concerned? What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: Santa Claus / Father Christmas

Although 'Santa' is becoming more popular in Britain, it will be a long time before 'Father Christmas' is obsolete! 'Pere Noel' and 'Kris Kringle' are other names by which Santa Claus / Father Christmas is known by, but these are not generally used in the US and the UK.
25. This is a small, pin-backed label worn usually on the clothing; it would display a picture or a slogan or the like, often politically-themed. What word is used in the USA / in the UK?

Answer: button / badge

Buttons, in both countries, are also clothing fasteners frequently seen on shirts and coats. Badges, again in both countries, can be fabric decorations sewn on clothing to indicate some level of accomplishment or achievement. The pins used to display slogans, commonly during an election campaign, are called campaign buttons in the US, and political badges in the UK.
Source: Author ArleneRimmer

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor thejazzkickazz before going online.
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