FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about The Foggiest Notion
Quiz about The Foggiest Notion

The Foggiest Notion Trivia Quiz


This is a quiz about some reasonably common British terms that sometimes leave other English speakers in the fog. They are taken from newspapers, broadcasts and contemporary books. I'll give the North American equivalent. Good luck!

A multiple-choice quiz by Bruyere. Estimated time: 4 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Humanities Trivia
  6. »
  7. Varieties of English
  8. »
  9. Cross-Atlantic Differences

Author
Bruyere
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
143,922
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
12 / 15
Plays
9288
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: sarahpplayer (14/15), Guest 23 (13/15), mermie316 (9/15).
- -
Question 1 of 15
1. What is a "boffin" in British usage? Hint


Question 2 of 15
2. What does "snog" mean in British English? Hint


Question 3 of 15
3. In British English the term "pudding", besides referring to the Christmas pudding or plum pudding we've all heard about, also is used in a more general way for something else. What does it mean? Hint


Question 4 of 15
4. If you need to hire a marquee for an event in the U.K., to what are you referring? Hint


Question 5 of 15
5. What does the term "en-suite" mean in British English? Hint


Question 6 of 15
6. If someone's getting "stroppy" in British English, what are they becoming?

Hint


Question 7 of 15
7. What is a "spin doctor"?

Hint


Question 8 of 15
8. If you are driving in the British countryside and see a sign saying "no tipping" next to the roadside, what does it mean? Hint


Question 9 of 15
9. What does the British term "gormless" mean?

Hint


Question 10 of 15
10. What does a "full stop" refer to in British English? Hint


Question 11 of 15
11. What does the term "jab" mean in British English? Hint


Question 12 of 15
12. If someone asks if you're "taking the mickey", what do they mean in British English? Hint


Question 13 of 15
13. What is a "duvet" in British English?

Hint


Question 14 of 15
14. If you're "chuffed" about something in British English, what are you? Hint


Question 15 of 15
15. What is an "anorak" in British English? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Jun 12 2024 : sarahpplayer: 14/15
Jun 11 2024 : Guest 23: 13/15
Jun 11 2024 : mermie316: 9/15
Jun 08 2024 : batkp: 12/15
Jun 04 2024 : CLeetz: 13/15
May 24 2024 : Jennifer5: 15/15
May 21 2024 : Terri2050: 11/15
May 11 2024 : DCW2: 15/15
May 09 2024 : Thbigbopper: 15/15

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. What is a "boffin" in British usage?

Answer: A scientist, brainiac or researcher (sometimes with nerdish tendencies)

This term is still used widely for a person and has been extended to software in some instances. It is often used like egghead or nerd however. "Some boffin's come up with this idea".
2. What does "snog" mean in British English?

Answer: To kiss or to pet (as in to make out)

This term is used widely though you must admit it doesn't sound too appealing from an onomatopoeic standpoint. When you read "then we snogged and it was so nice" in a teen romance novel it does tend to make you uncomfortable until you find out what it means.
3. In British English the term "pudding", besides referring to the Christmas pudding or plum pudding we've all heard about, also is used in a more general way for something else. What does it mean?

Answer: Dessert in general

"What's for pudding tonight?" means what's for dessert no matter what it is. It's the familiar term rather than the term used on a menu though. The proof may be in the pudding (is in the eating), but you aren't asked to provide pudding instead of evidence.
4. If you need to hire a marquee for an event in the U.K., to what are you referring?

Answer: You're renting a large tent or canopied room in which to hold an event

If you look up "marquee hire" you'll see the lovely array of these tents to rent. If you look at any of the ever-popular wedding films coming out of Britain, you'll probably spot one. In the U.S however, a theater marquee is of course the illuminated sign above a theater entrance and many of the older ones are considered historical monuments of architectural significance.
5. What does the term "en-suite" mean in British English?

Answer: The room you're in includes its own bathroom and toilet facilities

This term has become more and more common as the British hotels and B and Bs are almost all converted to en suite accommodations in order to respond to the wishes of guests. Prior to this, you would often find the bathroom (this often just means the room with the bath and not necessarily the toilet itself) separate and shared between several guests.

As many hotels or B and B's were in older homes, the plumbing facilities require an investment however so you'll find they advertise proudly the en suite facilities in the rooms they offer. Though most Americans would take this for granted, it's still not as widespread as you'd think.

The term can be used for private homes too. When you're looking for accommodations, you'll want to check that.
6. If someone's getting "stroppy" in British English, what are they becoming?

Answer: They are becoming difficult, obstinate, or irritable

This one isn't quite as obvious to people as one might think. Whenever I see several people who don't get a term, I note it down.
7. What is a "spin doctor"?

Answer: A speech writer/PR person for politicians

The term refers to a speech writer or PR person who puts the right "spin" or effect on a speech. The term was used in the states for the Clinton administration but the person for whom allegedly the term was used in the UK is Alistair Campbell working for Prime minister Tony Blair. At the time of "press" Alistair is probably not going to spin much longer.
8. If you are driving in the British countryside and see a sign saying "no tipping" next to the roadside, what does it mean?

Answer: No dumping

As the British commitment to the environment means that they charge a heavy environmental fee to dispose of large objects such as refrigerators, cars, or similar things, people have unfortunately taken to dumping them in the countryside to escape the fee.

Therefore the signs are all around to warn them. I assumed that this meant no impromptu horse racing in the fields or tipping to anyone standing there asking for handouts. I ignored the obvious, dump trucks tip!
9. What does the British term "gormless" mean?

Answer: Stupid, ignorant, without a clue

I'm not sure why this word always took me a while to catch on, but it did, perhaps I'm gormless and I don't know it!
10. What does a "full stop" refer to in British English?

Answer: A period (punctuation)

This one comes up often as we edit in Quizzyland. Though this is really obvious when you see it, we have to remember that the British and American usage aren't terribly close in this instance.
11. What does the term "jab" mean in British English?

Answer: a shot (as in inoculation or vaccination)

Yes, you get your flu jab.
12. If someone asks if you're "taking the mickey", what do they mean in British English?

Answer: You're pulling his or her leg, putting them on.

This one has never made sense to me...as aren't you giving the mickey rather than taking it? Nevertheless, I'm putting it in this quiz in the interests of international understanding.
I have Wajo to thank for the following information as the expression used more commonly is "to take the piss", we have a Cockney rhyming slang origin for the Mickey term, "Mickey Bliss" was apparently a Vaudevillian figure therefore, the slang omitted the Bliss which rhymes with piss. Oh well, think you get the picture.
By the way, to slip someone a mickey in older American slang was to knock someone out.
13. What is a "duvet" in British English?

Answer: A comforter (the type on which you put a loose cloth cover)

"Duvet" comes from the French for down or fuzz, however they use the word "couette" for the bedding. "Duvet" in French now refers to soft downy hair that people like to rid themselves of in some areas and gain on their heads if they're worried about their hair loss! The duvet is a wonderful style of bedding as your sheet encases your blanket and you just shake it and make your bed in a snap.

It is a hassle getting the thing into its cover, though. The Swedish chain IKEA was one of the first to market this style of bedding in the States. I suppose it's difficult to market with queen and king size beds though, it would cost a fortune!
14. If you're "chuffed" about something in British English, what are you?

Answer: Excited, proud

It might sound obvious to our British friends, however I tested it on several Americans and like me, few caught on at first. You might say, "I was really chuffed when I got a 19 on the daily quiz" and well you might!
15. What is an "anorak" in British English?

Answer: A sort of large coat and by extension the person who wears it, perceived as boring and conventional

The anorak is used for this style of coat in French as well. If you spot an anorak trainspotting, you're in for a treat in boredom I imagine! Anoraks have a tendency to be interested in details of things that would seem insignificant to mere mortals. The original word is of Inuit origin and the coat was made of seal or caribou and coated with fish oil.
Hope you've enjoyed this and as I said, I've attempted to take those that I've seen on several occasions and which mystified non British English speakers.
Source: Author Bruyere

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor fringe before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
6/13/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us