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Quiz about Return of the Foggiest Notion
Quiz about Return of the Foggiest Notion

Return of the Foggiest Notion Trivia Quiz


Here are some more British English expressions used in everyday life, the press, television and novels that sometimes mystify the rest of us. I'll give the North American equivalent. Good luck!

A multiple-choice quiz by Bruyere. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
Bruyere
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
175,354
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
11 / 15
Plays
4738
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: bgjd (12/15), skb99 (15/15), DaMoopies (13/15).
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Question 1 of 15
1. If your trolley has gone missing in the UK, what has happened in American English? Hint


Question 2 of 15
2. If you've "pulled" in a British disco or club, what have you done? Hint


Question 3 of 15
3. What does "to slag off" someone mean in British usage? Hint


Question 4 of 15
4. If you see the term OAP while touring the UK, to whom or to what does it refer? Hint


Question 5 of 15
5. If you're in a Wendy house in the UK, where are you? Hint


Question 6 of 15
6. What is a flytipper or fly tipper in the UK? Hint


Question 7 of 15
7. Which of the following is NOT a beverage in the UK? Hint


Question 8 of 15
8. If you're working as a supply teacher in the UK, what is the American equivalent? Hint


Question 9 of 15
9. If you like your tipple in British usage, what do you like? Hint


Question 10 of 15
10. If you need a "skip" in British English, what do you require? Hint


Question 11 of 15
11. If you're in the bog in Great Britain, where are you in North America? Hint


Question 12 of 15
12. Which of the following British terms does NOT refer to a sandwich or one of its components?

Hint


Question 13 of 15
13. Which one of these food items is NOT sweet in the UK? Hint


Question 14 of 15
14. Do you want to go to a boot sale in the UK? You'll need to know what it is first however. Any ideas? Hint


Question 15 of 15
15. If you need your 'cozzie' in the UK, where are we? Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. If your trolley has gone missing in the UK, what has happened in American English?

Answer: You've lost your shopping cart.

This is one of those things that we wouldn't guess in North American usage unless it was in context. To lose your trolley or be off of it could also mean your temper or your mind though. A trolley in North American usage would be like the one in the 'Rice-a-Roni' commercial, a San Francisco treat.

They may exist elsewhere, in their bus or track form, but the SF trolleys are legendary. Sometimes you'll see the term trolley used on the internet for shopping basket on a site which sells things.
2. If you've "pulled" in a British disco or club, what have you done?

Answer: You've attracted someone.

I gradually realized I'd thought this was something different as I read more contemporary British novels. I suppose it's absolutely clear but the British and American versions vary quite a bit. It's not quite the more aggressive "hit on", as it's closer to the effect rather than the action.
3. What does "to slag off" someone mean in British usage?

Answer: To speak badly about someone or rag them playfully

Once again, I hadn't ever heard this term in the States growing up, but it doesn't mean it's never used. I just tested it out on a few Americans of different ages first. Sounds rather geological when you think about it.
4. If you see the term OAP while touring the UK, to whom or to what does it refer?

Answer: A senior citizen or retiree

OAP refers to Old Age Pensioner. The soft bread roll is a bap. Funnily enough, though normally British English is known for its euphemisms, in this instance they actually use the O word or Old. You might see this for rates for the cinema or other things. You'll also see it used in articles in newspapers where that status is slightly unusual, "OAP wins rollerblading competition".

In America, you're guaranteed a senior discount in many places, restaurants etc, but, it's embarrassing to give in and ask for it to be applied I'm told! I believe they're using the euphemism "Golden" in the States, at least I've seen it a few times.

In the UK, you'll even see the careful for elderly people signs with a person using a stick aka cane.
5. If you're in a Wendy house in the UK, where are you?

Answer: You're in a playhouse for children, so you'd better duck.

I'll never forget learning this term. A young Englishwoman teaching at a French university hadn't traveled a great deal but had had quite a bit of 'book learnin' and simply couldn't understand why the Americans present couldn't fathom what she meant by a Wendy house. We were obviously ignorant Yanks if we didn't know that. "Why everybody knows that!" However, I assure my British friends, this term isn't in use in the states. Never assume something's obvious when you travel around.
6. What is a flytipper or fly tipper in the UK?

Answer: An illegal rubbish or trash dumper in the countryside

I first saw this a while back in newspapers. When Britain stepped up its ecological protective measures, people began dumping things illegally, or tipping, in the countryside so they wouldn't have to pay the fees. The measures to catch flytippers are drastic, and the police are trying to encourage people to give information to them.
7. Which of the following is NOT a beverage in the UK?

Answer: Bubble and Squeak

Horlicks is a brand name for a malted milk beverage. Ribena is another brand name for a black currant flavoured drink. Squash is usually lemon or orangeade, also coming in concentrated form. (I loved this in India, after drinking Campa Cola for weeks). Bubble and Squeak is an Old English breakfast dish of leftover greens and potatoes. I confess I haven't eaten it yet, but, I have eaten fried tomatoes quite often, so it can't be much different, can it? I'm just wary of the greens part. What could it mean, spinach? Brussels sprouts? I have my limits. But I suppose when in Rome, do as the Romans do.
8. If you're working as a supply teacher in the UK, what is the American equivalent?

Answer: A substitute teacher

I suppose this is self-explanatory to the British, but I still had to read it twice for a long while before I understood it first time. Sorry about that economics one, where else would you learn about Supply and Demand?
Eddie Izzard the comic uses this term in one of their filmed sketches and I doubt if the American crowd catches the reference.
9. If you like your tipple in British usage, what do you like?

Answer: Booze, alcoholic beverages, wine

The headline in "The Connexion", a small British paper for expatriates in France, that inspired this was announcing that a British hospital was going to give patients two glasses of Bordeaux per day as it was good for the heart. They did add that patients with problems with alcohol wouldn't be included in the program. Nor would people waiting twice in the queue I suppose.
10. If you need a "skip" in British English, what do you require?

Answer: A trash dumpster

This might be something you'd have in front of a construction site or at a larger building.
11. If you're in the bog in Great Britain, where are you in North America?

Answer: The john (or bathroom in more familiar terms)

Sorry, I suppose your bog might be a mess, perhaps I shouldn't have given that answer! By the way, it is ok to say you're going to the toilet in British English whereas Americans wouldn't say that ever, it would sound odd or even vulgar in some instances. We'd use the euphemistic word bathroom in a home or between us and restroom when out and about.

The euphemism "lounge" is used in a large place, like a casino or a hotel. (I won't tell you that lounge means living room in Britain for many folks, it will complicate matters). Perhaps in an airplane the word toilet is used, but if you do ask for the toilet in an American home, it would sound a bit unrefined. And if you said you were in the toilet that would sound even worse! Isn't life complicated? May I commend the Brits on the availability of public facilities and also, handicapped facilities in every town square? It's one of the best things about travelling there.
12. Which of the following British terms does NOT refer to a sandwich or one of its components?

Answer: Bupa

BUPA is a British private health insurance scheme. You'll hear it used often on the television and in the papers as being an alternative when the National Health scheme fails. A bap is a soft roll, the term supposedly originating from Scot's English, from pap, or breast as it was shaped similarly! A sarny is the word used for sandwich in areas of Britain.

A butty is also a word used very often for a sandwich and a chip butty is a sandwich made out of chips or French fries with, I'm told, vinegar and tomato sauce or ketchup. If you're a fan of "Keeping Up Appearances" Onslow often awakes and asks his wife to make him a bacon butty. And don't forget to pronounce the t's or it's not the same thing.
13. Which one of these food items is NOT sweet in the UK?

Answer: Cream cracker

A fairy cake is a cupcake. Flake is Cadbury's chocolate, if you ask for it on ice cream it's supposedly a heavenly treat though I haven't had it yet. A digestive biscuit is, despite the sound of it, something close to a graham cracker, or a plain cookie. Cream crackers are just a sort of plain cracker.
14. Do you want to go to a boot sale in the UK? You'll need to know what it is first however. Any ideas?

Answer: A tailgate sale, or perhaps, flea market from your vehicle

These are fun, if you see a sign while you're travelling around, it's worth a visit to see what Brits sell at these things. Americans have tailgate parties at sporting events, but as far as I know, the flea market has registered vendors and occasional vendors, not just people near their cars. I haven't seen any trunk sales and I'd avoid any merchandise that 'fell off a truck.'
15. If you need your 'cozzie' in the UK, where are we?

Answer: Going swimming, it's a swimsuit

Well, it's actually short for bathing costume, or swimming costume.
Hope you enjoyed this. As always, great care was taken to ensure the general meanings for these words, therefore if I've slipped up on the meaning in your neck of the woods, it's an oversight. I thank my friends from all over the world for helping me with their impressions on these quizzes. Bruyere aka Heather
Source: Author Bruyere

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