FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Finally You Realize I Was Write
Quiz about Finally You Realize I Was Write

Finally! You Realize I Was Write Quiz


These ten authors gave detailed descriptions of events or inventions which did not yet exist. Looking back from the future, it seems they may have been write!

A multiple-choice quiz by Godwit. Estimated time: 3 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Literature Trivia
  6. »
  7. Mixed Literature
  8. »
  9. Specific Subjects & Themes

Author
Godwit
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
371,250
Updated
Feb 25 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
1299
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: MariaVerde (9/10), Guest 209 (8/10), teachdpo (5/10).
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. In 1865 fiction author Jules Verne wrote a novel about a space launch, which did happen much as he said, but in 1969. Jules took readers "From the Earth to..." where? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. In "Gulliver's Travels", written in 1726, astronomers discover two small moons orbiting Mars. Which author saw far ahead of his time? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. The fiction crime novel "Debt of Honor" described a terrorist attack very like that of September 11th, 2001 upon the USA. But who wrote it, in 1994? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Which forward-seeing author with political views wrote "The World Set Free" in 1914, describing an "atomic bomb"? It wasn't Oceania who designed it. Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. What did "Looking Backward", an 1887 utopian novel by Edward Bellamy, describe from the future? It allowed citizens to shop without cash. (Just don't forget your PIN.) Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. In 1879 author Ed Mitchell wrote about a machine that rolls out information a person can then read. What machine did Mitchell foretell, first available in homes some 100 years later? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. In the 1909 story "The Machine Stops", humans lived underground attached to a machine through which they met their needs, and communicated with each other. Who wrote "The Machine Stops"? He might be a friend of Howards. Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. In 1987 this author correctly predicted the invention of on-demand video services, later known as Netflix and Hulu, for instance. Who had broad knowledge in the world of film, and died in 2013 of thyroid and gland cancer? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. In 1898 Morgan Robertson wrote about the biggest ship ever made, which crashed into an iceberg and sank. Was he describing the Titanic?


Question 10 of 10
10. Which 16th century author has been said to predict the death of Henry II of France, the French Revolution, Napoleon, Adolf Hitler, both world wars and the nuclear bomb, as well as the assassination of both Kennedy brothers? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
May 08 2024 : MariaVerde: 9/10
May 08 2024 : Guest 209: 8/10
May 01 2024 : teachdpo: 5/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In 1865 fiction author Jules Verne wrote a novel about a space launch, which did happen much as he said, but in 1969. Jules took readers "From the Earth to..." where?

Answer: the Moon

In 1865, 104 years before Apollo 11 took men to the moon, Jules Verne wrote his novel "From the Earth to the Moon". Verne described a launch into space from the state of Florida, with three astronauts, who experienced changes in gravity. He even fairly accurately made rough calculations required for a launch. Apollo 11 launched from Florida in July, 1969, shooting three men toward the moon, very like what Verne had described.

This story had great influence on future space travel scientists and authors.

Some believe Verne also predicted airships and submarines, though the technology did exist during his lifetime.
2. In "Gulliver's Travels", written in 1726, astronomers discover two small moons orbiting Mars. Which author saw far ahead of his time?

Answer: Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) was a writer and clergyman, author of the novel "Gulliver's Travels" written possibly as early as 1713, but certainly by 1726. In it, astronomers discover two tiny moons orbiting Mars. The actual two moons of mars, Phobos and Deimos, were not discovered until 1877 by Asaph Hall, using the largest telescope in the world at that time. "Gulliver's Travels" was originally titled "Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World...".

The writer Voltaire presumably was influenced by Swift when he wrote a 1750 short story, "Micromegas", in which an alien visitor to Earth refers to two moons of Mars.

The Swift crater on the Mars moon Deimos is named after Jonathan.
3. The fiction crime novel "Debt of Honor" described a terrorist attack very like that of September 11th, 2001 upon the USA. But who wrote it, in 1994?

Answer: Tom Clancy

Thriller master Tom Clancy (1947-2013) wrote "Debt of Honor" in 1994, in which he described an airplane crashing into the US capitol, similar to the September 11, 2001 aircraft attacks. Clancy is well known for description of fictional events that later come to pass.

Another is found in his 2010 novel, coauthored with Grant Blackwood, "Dead or Alive". A public enemy named Yasin is captured by a Navy SEAL team, but not in the mountain caves where everyone assumed him to be. He's found in an upscale house a short drive from a major city. Clancy got it right--Osama bin Laden was captured just that way in May, 2011.
4. Which forward-seeing author with political views wrote "The World Set Free" in 1914, describing an "atomic bomb"? It wasn't Oceania who designed it.

Answer: H.G. Wells

Englishman Herbert George Wells (1866-1946) authored textbooks, political works, novels and science fiction. In 1914 he wrote about an "atomic bomb". Some think Wells inadvertently inspired the bomb, when physicist Leo Szilard read "The World set Free" in 1932.

He then co-patented the nuclear reactor, which enabled design of the bomb in 1942. Wells wrote "The Future of America" (1906) discussing "The Tragedy of Colour"--a future denial of much to black Americans. He penned a "ray gun" (the laser), a wireless intercom with voice mail (cell phone), moving conveyer belts (airport walkways), automatic sliding doors, and genetic engineering. Something he was wrong about: "The Time Machine". Oceania was the ruling party in George Orwell's "Nineteen Eighty Four".
5. What did "Looking Backward", an 1887 utopian novel by Edward Bellamy, describe from the future? It allowed citizens to shop without cash. (Just don't forget your PIN.)

Answer: Debit cards

"Looking Backward, 2000-1887" was written in 1887 by American Edward Bellamy (born 1850). It was about an American utopian society in the year 2000, where people were allotted credit on a card, which they used to buy goods. Initially there was an equal allotment to everyone, but special citizens soon gained additional credit.

This work sold over 200,000 copies and sparked a national political movement. Bellamy also wrote fictional descriptions of what we now call shopping malls. The first shopping mall in the US didn't exist until 1922, long after Bellamy died of tuberculosis in 1898, at just 48 years old.
6. In 1879 author Ed Mitchell wrote about a machine that rolls out information a person can then read. What machine did Mitchell foretell, first available in homes some 100 years later?

Answer: Home printer

Edward Page Mitchell (1852-1927) wrote "The Senator's Daughter" in 1879. It described a home printer. The high-speed printer was designed in 1953 but was not available in homes until 1988, more than 100 years after Mitchell wrote of it: "...an endless strip of printed paper, about three feet wide, was slowly issuing from between noiseless rollers and falling in neat folds into a willow basket placed on the floor to receive it. Mr. Wanlee bent his head over the broad strip of paper and began to read attentively."

Mitchell was instrumental in developing the science fiction genre. He wrote about an invisible guy ("The Crystal Man") years ahead of H.G. Wells. He described a time travel machine, speed of light travel, a cyborg, and teleportation. Accounting machines could print tabs in the 1920s, so that wasn't the answer.
7. In the 1909 story "The Machine Stops", humans lived underground attached to a machine through which they met their needs, and communicated with each other. Who wrote "The Machine Stops"? He might be a friend of Howards.

Answer: E.M. Forster

Perhaps best known for "A Passage to India" and "Howards End", Edward Morgan Forster (1879-1970) penned 6 novels, as well as many essays, short stories and musical text. His 1909 "The Machine Stops" expressed his concerns about overdependence on technology. In this short story humans live underground, attached to a machine very like the Internet. They use what became known more than 90 years later as instant messaging, and video chat. For example:

"...the round plate that she held in her hands began to glow. A faint blue light shot across it, darkening to purple, and presently she could see the image of her son, who lived on the other side of the earth, and he could see her."
8. In 1987 this author correctly predicted the invention of on-demand video services, later known as Netflix and Hulu, for instance. Who had broad knowledge in the world of film, and died in 2013 of thyroid and gland cancer?

Answer: Roger Ebert

Best known as a film critic, Roger Ebert (1942-2013) published more than 20 non-fiction books, and one novel. He was also a journalist, screenwriter, and a wildly popular film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times for over 40 years. He won the first Pulitzer Prize for Criticism.

In a 1987 interview Ebert said of the future, "We will have high-definition wide-screen TV sets, and a push-button dialing system to order the movie you want at the time you want it". Home consumers could access on-demand Internet "streaming" media around 1996, after the first large-scale, live, online concert broadcast. Netflix on-demand media provider was founded in 1997. YouTube.com video site opened in 2005.
9. In 1898 Morgan Robertson wrote about the biggest ship ever made, which crashed into an iceberg and sank. Was he describing the Titanic?

Answer: No

Morgan Robertson wrote "Futility" (later renamed "The Wreck of the Titan") in 1898, fourteen years before the RMS Titanic tragedy of 1912. In his story, the Titan was "800 feet, displacing 75,000 tons" (the Titanic was 882 feet, displacing 53,000 long tons).

The Titan AND the Titanic both carried too few lifeboats, they were moving too fast and struck an iceberg on their starboard sides, at night, in the North Atlantic. Both were 400 nautical miles from Newfoundland. Robertson described his Titan as "unsinkable". Sadly, and weirdly, he was right. William T. Stead, an Englishman who died on the Titanic, had also published an 1892 story about a ship that collided with an iceberg.
10. Which 16th century author has been said to predict the death of Henry II of France, the French Revolution, Napoleon, Adolf Hitler, both world wars and the nuclear bomb, as well as the assassination of both Kennedy brothers?

Answer: Nostradamus

Frenchman Michel de Nostredame, Latinised to Nostradamus, lived in 1503-1566. His most famous book was "Les Propheties" (The Prophecies) written in 1555, which has over 200 editions. He wrote well over six thousand prophecies, while another sixty were lost.

His first wife and children died of the plague, an epidemic that greatly influenced the course of his life and work. He remarried and had six children. Catherine de Medici, wife of King Henry II, was a great admirer. Though many considered him a "prophet" who predicted many future events with accuracy, others saw him as a convoluted, misinterpreted historian.

He rejected the label "prophet". Yet, centuries later, many believe he was right.
Source: Author Godwit

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor looney_tunes before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series Fab Literature Quizzes:

Some wonderful authors (plus me) give us these Literature quizzes

  1. Verdict: Guilty! Average
  2. Finally! You Realize I Was Write Average
  3. The Places You Go Average
  4. World Literature Average
  5. A Novel Approach To Novels Average

Also part of quiz lists:
6/22/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us