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Quiz about Sexing the Cherry
Quiz about Sexing the Cherry

Sexing the Cherry Trivia Quiz


This quiz is on Jeanette Winterson's incredible novel "Sexing the Cherry."

A multiple-choice quiz by serapheim. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
serapheim
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
101,985
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
251
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Question 1 of 10
1. In what time periods are the characters situated? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. What are the icons heading each chapter that denote the character? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. The main characters are Jordan and a giantess who is compared to what animal?

Answer: (one word, just the animal's name)
Question 4 of 10
4. Winterson re-writes history and embellishes it with magic realism. She also re-writes a famous fairytale which grants more female autonomy to an otherwise patriarchal story. Which fairytale does she re-write? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. What magical talent does the elusive Fortunata have? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. What disasters coincide in different centuries in the novel? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Whose dismembered body parts does the monstrous female protagonist collect? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. What body part does she collect in large quantities?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 9 of 10
9. Winterson's narrative style in "Sexing the Cherry" is very similar to Nights at the Circus, which depicts a giantess much like Winterson's portagonist, who performs in the cirus along with a motley crew in the 19th Century. Which author wrote ths precursor to "Sexing the Cherry"? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. This may be a bit more difficult. Winterson uses the worldview of a particular tribe as paradigm for her collapsing of space and time throughout the novel. For instance, both centuries are presented as simultaneous epochs. Jordan discusses this tribe in his speculations on the nature of the jouney and the tribe is also mentioned in an inscription before the first chapter. What tribe has no tenses for past, present, and future?

Answer: (one word, four letters)

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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In what time periods are the characters situated?

Answer: 17th and 20th Centuries

Winterson's novel conflates space-time divisions most prominently by fusing the 17th and 20th centuries. The characters are situated 17th Century London before the great fire of 1666 and during the war between Puritans and Loyalists at the same time as a capitalistic 20th Century.
2. What are the icons heading each chapter that denote the character?

Answer: banana, pineapple

Although all of these are used to symbolize various fragments of the text, pineapples and bananas are used to symbolize the two protagonists' narratives. The symbols are manipulated throughout-- for instance-- the pineapple is dismembered in the 20th century.
3. The main characters are Jordan and a giantess who is compared to what animal?

Answer: dog

Jordan is a foundling of the river Thames who is cared for by Dog-Woman, a giantess who literally smothers men against her magnanimous body.
4. Winterson re-writes history and embellishes it with magic realism. She also re-writes a famous fairytale which grants more female autonomy to an otherwise patriarchal story. Which fairytale does she re-write?

Answer: The Twelve Dancing Princesses

Winterson's version of the Twelve Dancing Princesses is radically reformulated and culminates in Twelve individual narratives of how the Princesses eventually leave (or murder!) their husbands. My particular favourite is the Princess who runs away with a mermaid to live in "perfect salty bliss"("Sexing the Cherry 48).
5. What magical talent does the elusive Fortunata have?

Answer: spinning into points of light

"At a dancing school in a remote place, Fortunata teaches her pupils to become points of light"("Sexing the Cherry" 72).

"She believes that we are fallen creatures who once knew how to fly. She says light burns in our bodies and threatens to dissolve us at any moment. How else can we account for so many of us who disappear"("Sexing the Cherry" 72)?
6. What disasters coincide in different centuries in the novel?

Answer: the Great fire, a factory fire

Dog Woman and Jordan create the Great Fire of 1666 and their 21st century counterparts set fire to a factory that is bleeding phosphorus into the river.
7. Whose dismembered body parts does the monstrous female protagonist collect?

Answer: Puritans

Dog Woman is a fierce Royalist and strongly opposed to Puritanical strictures on the body and mind.
8. What body part does she collect in large quantities?

Answer: eyes

Dog Woman's collection of eyes is perhaps a metaphor for the spiritual blindness of the Puritans.
9. Winterson's narrative style in "Sexing the Cherry" is very similar to Nights at the Circus, which depicts a giantess much like Winterson's portagonist, who performs in the cirus along with a motley crew in the 19th Century. Which author wrote ths precursor to "Sexing the Cherry"?

Answer: Angela Carter

Although Jeanette Winterson is highly influenced by all of these authors, she is most indebted, as many critics have suggested, to Carter's narrative style in "Sexing the Cherry," sharing similar themes and magic realist elements with "Nights at the Circus." Both authors also poke fun of literary criticism in an unabashedly cheeky manner.

At times, I can see them trying to get away with whatever they can.
10. This may be a bit more difficult. Winterson uses the worldview of a particular tribe as paradigm for her collapsing of space and time throughout the novel. For instance, both centuries are presented as simultaneous epochs. Jordan discusses this tribe in his speculations on the nature of the jouney and the tribe is also mentioned in an inscription before the first chapter. What tribe has no tenses for past, present, and future?

Answer: hopi

"The Hopi, an Indian tribe, have a language as sophisticated as ours, but no tenses for past, present, and future. The division does not exist. What does this say about time?"("Sexing the Cherry 8).

For further interest on this amazing writer, you may want to check out winterson.com, a fabulous site where Winterson submits posts on discussion boards, in addition to monthly columns, news, and exerpts from her novels.
Source: Author serapheim

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Bruyere before going online.
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