Quiz about The Poetic Stylings of Poems Themselves
Quiz about The Poetic Stylings of Poems Themselves

The Poetic Stylings of Poems Themselves Quiz


Poetry is a wonderful art, and poems can be free, or very structured. I'll give you part of a poem I've written; you choose the closing line, based on the poem's style.

A multiple-choice quiz by Tchochkekop. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Tchochkekop
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
318,925
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
2033
Awards
Editor's Choice
Last 3 plays: Coachpete1 (10/10), Guest 73 (1/10), Guest 72 (1/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. What is the best closing line for the following limerick?

This quiz is on poetry style.
'Tis simple; I shall use no guile.
Elim'nate the rest,
Pick the answer that's best,
Hint

The answer is obvious to all.
Or else I shall think you a pest!
Pick me! Pick me! I am the one with the right style!
It should not take you quite a while.

2. What is the best closing line for the following Shakespearean sonnet? (Only the second-to-last line is given, but that should be enough.)

This quiz, I fear, is taxing on my mind;
Hint

And yet, the answer, swiftly will I find.
My choice shall obviously to my fingers bind.
I hope, in all, to answer all aright.
Old William definitely would choose this line!

3. What is the best closing line for the following acrostic poem?

Can you guess what's in my mind?
Only the wisest shall know!
Reflect on answers of various kind,
Rejecting those that come to you too slow.
Each possibility presents itself anew,
Catching your fleeting thoughts, 'tis true.
Hint

For if you guess correctly, you'll not be blue.
Thus this is that which gets the points for you.
Maybe this choice brings joy to more than few.
Correct this answer, or incorrect it may be, too.

4. What is the best closing line for the following haiku?

This quiz is not hard!
For those who like poetry,
Hint

And want to learn more.
This quiz is not hard at all.
And whose knowledge won't be barred.
The answer comes quickly.

5. Which of the choices could be a proper closing line for the following free verse?

Can poetry bare what's in our hearts?
It is more elegant than prose,
Than narrative,
Than tale.
And yet, all poems must end, so...
Hint

My heart, as well, no longer can be on show.
Any of these will work.
What? So what? Sew what? Sew lines of poetry 'round my heart.
This must be the final line for now.

6. What is the best closing line for the following diamante poem (to replace the question mark)? (Ignore the hyphens; they're just to give the poem shape.) As two hints, diamante means "diamond-shaped", and this is an antonymic diamante, one that contrasts two ideas.
- - - - - - - - - -Poetry
- - - - - -Lyrical, metaphoric
- -Exposing, exploring, suggesting
Verses, meter, sentences, clauses
- -Telling, displaying, stating
- - - - - -Exact, literal
- - - - - - - - - -?
Hint

Poetry
Just words
The end
Prose

7. What is the best closing line for the following elegy?

Poets may come, and some poets may go, but we no more shall see this one.
Hint

Until such a time as he joyfully returns to us.
So look to the future; bright promise it brings.
But others, far better, shall come in his place.
To the beyond, ne'er returning again, he has passed, alas.

8. Which of the following would be the best closing line for an epic?
Hint

Alas, his tragic end due not to victor's skill, but inward cowardice felt.
And thus he returned, yet brave, ever stalwart, a hero for e'er more.
The river ever flowing, carrying our cargo and our dreams.
Epics are made by fools like me, but only Homer can write the Odyssey.

9. What is the best closing line for the following quatrain?

This poem may have something wrong.
Can you discern what the problem may be?
Is there no meter; should this be a song?
Think upon it and you yet may see.
Hint

A poem written just for you from me.
The bells toll their mournful notes, "ding dong."
None of these
If you know not, you may just take a guess.

10. What is the best closing line for the following (miniature version of an) ode?

To write a quiz so well, is tough for mortal minds.
And writing one on poetry harder still.
But should that quiz replete with poems be,
...
Hint

You get a quiz no one can understand.
These odes I hope shall never odious be.
Then weavers of dreams shall dream forever more.
All hail the genius shown by Tchochkekop!


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. What is the best closing line for the following limerick? This quiz is on poetry style. 'Tis simple; I shall use no guile. Elim'nate the rest, Pick the answer that's best,

Answer: It should not take you quite a while.

A limerick is a five-line poem with an "aa bb a" rhyme scheme, so the last word here has to rhyme with "style" and "guile". The meter of lines 1, 2, and 5 is "ua uua uua", where "u" and "a" are "unaccented" and "accented" respectively.
2. What is the best closing line for the following Shakespearean sonnet? (Only the second-to-last line is given, but that should be enough.) This quiz, I fear, is taxing on my mind;

Answer: And yet, the answer, swiftly will I find.

The Shakespearean sonnet's rhyme scheme is abab cdcd efef gg, so the last word here must rhyme with "mind". Each line must be iambic pentameter. An iamb has a "ua" meter, such as "today", or "alike". There must be five iambs in each line. "Obviously" is obviously not iambic!
3. What is the best closing line for the following acrostic poem? Can you guess what's in my mind? Only the wisest shall know! Reflect on answers of various kind, Rejecting those that come to you too slow. Each possibility presents itself anew, Catching your fleeting thoughts, 'tis true.

Answer: Thus this is that which gets the points for you.

In this case, the rhyme scheme and meter are not important! In an acrostic, the initial letters of each line spell a word (often, but not always, a name). Here, you need to choose the answer whose first letter completes the word "correct".
4. What is the best closing line for the following haiku? This quiz is not hard! For those who like poetry,

Answer: And want to learn more.

A haiku is a three-line poem with 5, 7, and 5 syllables in the three lines. Rhymes are optional.
5. Which of the choices could be a proper closing line for the following free verse? Can poetry bare what's in our hearts? It is more elegant than prose, Than narrative, Than tale. And yet, all poems must end, so...

Answer: Any of these will work.

This should be easy! Free verse does not require a certain number of lines, meter, rhyme, or any structure whatsoever. Any of the answers, including "Any of these will work," are perfectly valid. (Not very "poetic", perhaps, but valid for free verse.)
6. What is the best closing line for the following diamante poem (to replace the question mark)? (Ignore the hyphens; they're just to give the poem shape.) As two hints, diamante means "diamond-shaped", and this is an antonymic diamante, one that contrasts two ideas. - - - - - - - - - -Poetry - - - - - -Lyrical, metaphoric - -Exposing, exploring, suggesting Verses, meter, sentences, clauses - -Telling, displaying, stating - - - - - -Exact, literal - - - - - - - - - -?

Answer: Prose

As mentioned, a diamante poem is so named because it forms a diamond. There are two types of diamante, synonymic and antonymic. In synonymic diamante, the first word and last word are related. In antonymic diamante, the first and last words contrast (they don't have to be opposites, strictly speaking). This antonymic diamante contrasts poetry and prose. The poem is always seven lines, with the following structure:
Line 1 - One word, opening theme.
Line 2 - Two adjectives describing the opening word.
Line 3 - Three words, ending in "ing", describing the opening word.
Line 4 - Four words, two relating to the opening word, and two relating to the closing word.
Line 5 - Three words, ending in "ing", describing the closing word.
Line 6 - Two adjectives describing the closing word.
Line 7 - One word, closing theme.
As you can see (I hope!), a diamante poem is symmetric about the middle words of the middle line. The trick is to make that line flow. I hope this one did!
7. What is the best closing line for the following elegy? Poets may come, and some poets may go, but we no more shall see this one.

Answer: To the beyond, ne'er returning again, he has passed, alas.

An elegy is a sad poem, generally about someone's death. In the original elegiac form it consists of two lines, the first of dactylic hexameter, and the second of dactylic pentameter. A dactyl is a set of three syllables with the stress pattern "auu", as in "baseball bat" or, fittingly, "poetry". Regardless of how well I did with the meter, only one of the answers was sufficiently sad for an elegy.
8. Which of the following would be the best closing line for an epic?

Answer: And thus he returned, yet brave, ever stalwart, a hero for e'er more.

An epic is a very long poem (ain'tcha glad I left out the other 1,768 lines?), usually about a hero or a great adventure. The Iliad and Odyssey are classic examples (pun intended).
9. What is the best closing line for the following quatrain? This poem may have something wrong. Can you discern what the problem may be? Is there no meter; should this be a song? Think upon it and you yet may see.

Answer: None of these

As the name suggests, a quatrain has four lines. The "sample" already had four, so any extra line would render it a quatrain no longer! Quatrains also have alternating rhymes, "abab", but that's not really relevant once you try to make a five-line quatrain.
10. What is the best closing line for the following (miniature version of an) ode? To write a quiz so well, is tough for mortal minds. And writing one on poetry harder still. But should that quiz replete with poems be, ...

Answer: All hail the genius shown by Tchochkekop!

An ode is a poem of praise, extolling or honoring a person. OK, so this ode was very self serving, but, hey, it was tough writing all these poems! By the way, the "dreamy" line refers to the team I play for (and with), Dream Weavers.
Source: Author Tchochkekop

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor LadyCaitriona before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Most Recent Scores
Jan 29 2023 : Coachpete1: 10/10
Jan 21 2023 : Guest 73: 1/10
Jan 17 2023 : Guest 72: 1/10
Jan 17 2023 : WesleyCrusher: 8/10
Jan 15 2023 : Guest 107: 2/10
Jan 13 2023 : Guest 176: 1/10
Dec 27 2022 : cjb1: 5/10
Dec 11 2022 : haydenspapa: 5/10

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