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Quiz about Cult Films
Quiz about Cult Films

Cult Films Trivia Quiz


What is a cult film? "Entertainment Weekly" defined a cult film as "a movie that attracts a small but devoted group of fans and that has remained popular over successive years among a small group of followers". Here are few that meet this criteria.

A multiple-choice quiz by Rehaberpro. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
Rehaberpro
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
269,151
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
7399
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 12 (6/10), tluvgrandpa (3/10), Guest 202 (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. "Reefer Madness" (1936) was purported to warn youth of the dangers of marijuana. Modern audiences found it difficult to take it seriously. What was the reason for this? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. David Lynch gained recognition for his early film "Eraserhead" (1970) that featured the struggles of a wild-haired protagonist, strange hissings and clangings on the soundtract, and a tiny band that played under the radiator. Lynch went on to direct many films that echo this style. Which one of these films was not directed by David Lynch? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Probably the most famous cult film of all time was "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" (1975). This satire on horror movies, with a musical and comic twist, was a staple of the cult film genre. Which of these actors was not in the film? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. "Freaks"(1932) was one the oldest classic cult films with sound. Tod Browning, who directed the orginal "Dracula", chose to use real carnival freaks rather than using actors with makeup. Three actors, Victor McLaglen, Myrna Loy, and Jean Harlow all turned down roles in the movie, as they considered the film distasteful. Two actors in the film, Harry Earles (Hans) and Daisy Earles (Frieda) had very restrained love scenes. Why was this? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. "Pink Flamingos" (1972) was one of the most disturbing gross-out films of all time. Nearly every type of perversion was explored. In the film there was a "Filthiest Person Alive" contest. Edie Massey plays Divine's mother. She lives in a crib, is very messy, and has a passion for a particular food. What was this food? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. "El Topo" (1970) opened quietly in New York, without publicity, at midnight and was the cult sensation of the early 1970s. It was generally accepted as the first of the midnight movie genre. It was violent, bloody, and burdened with symbolism. It became a cult favorite of many celebrities. After it closed its run in the mid-1970s, it disappeared from the market. What was the reason for this? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. "Repo Man" (1984) told the story of a repo man (Harry Dean Stanton) breaking in a young apprentice, played by Emilio Estevez. A repo man reclaims cars from those unfortunate people who don't make payments and who are not always happy to surrender the vehicle. A one point in the film, the trunk of a car was opened. What was found?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. "Entertainment Weekly" rated "This Is Spinal Tap" (1984) as number one in a ranking of the fifty best cult films. It told, though a mockumentary, the strivings of a Rock and Roll Band. Who was the director? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. "Harold and Maude" (1971) told the story of a teenager (Bud Cort) and his relationship with a 79 and three quarter year old woman (Ruth Gordon). They shared a common interest in funerals and death in general. Harold liked to play tricks on his mother. What did he do? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. If a cult movie is a film that appeals to a small but devoted audience, then "Slap Shot" (1977) qualifies. Youth hockey players related to the exploits of the hapless Charlestown Chiefs. Three brothers joined the team in mid-season and turned the team's fortunes around. What was the name of these brothers? Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "Reefer Madness" (1936) was purported to warn youth of the dangers of marijuana. Modern audiences found it difficult to take it seriously. What was the reason for this?

Answer: All of these

"Reefer Madness" was financed by several church groups and was one of the films that was on the exposition tours of the 30s and 40s, where these types of films found an audience. The orignal name was "Tell Your Children". The film was not particularly successful and was not shown for about 35 years.

In the 70s it was rediscovered and became a hit on college campuses and with pot smokers. It was frequently shown as a midnight movie.
2. David Lynch gained recognition for his early film "Eraserhead" (1970) that featured the struggles of a wild-haired protagonist, strange hissings and clangings on the soundtract, and a tiny band that played under the radiator. Lynch went on to direct many films that echo this style. Which one of these films was not directed by David Lynch?

Answer: Polyester

"Eraserhead" took Lynch five years to finish and depended, in part, on family and friends for financing. Eraserhead was a nerdish character stuck in modern society, burdened with a loveless marriage and a deformed child. Lynch is also renowned for his TV series "Twin Peaks". "Polyester" was a John Waters' film.
3. Probably the most famous cult film of all time was "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" (1975). This satire on horror movies, with a musical and comic twist, was a staple of the cult film genre. Which of these actors was not in the film?

Answer: Vincent Price

The movie was based on the musical staged both in London and New York. It has had a wide release for over thirty years and was generally shown as a "midnight movie" It was so popular that fans duplicated the costumes, learned the dialogue by heart, and replicated the dancing sequences.

It became an audience participation phenomenon. No other film quite captured the cult appeal of "The Rocky Horror Picture Show". Vincent Price made a lot of movies but not this one.
4. "Freaks"(1932) was one the oldest classic cult films with sound. Tod Browning, who directed the orginal "Dracula", chose to use real carnival freaks rather than using actors with makeup. Three actors, Victor McLaglen, Myrna Loy, and Jean Harlow all turned down roles in the movie, as they considered the film distasteful. Two actors in the film, Harry Earles (Hans) and Daisy Earles (Frieda) had very restrained love scenes. Why was this?

Answer: Harry and Daisy were brother and sister.

The shocking casting of real life carnival freaks to participate in the film drew criticism, as many thought these performers were being exploited. The film was banned in the UK and Australia. After thirty years it was finally taken from the banned list.

There is little doubt that viewers at that time were made uncomfortable by the real life freaks and the film preyed on some of our deepest fears.
5. "Pink Flamingos" (1972) was one of the most disturbing gross-out films of all time. Nearly every type of perversion was explored. In the film there was a "Filthiest Person Alive" contest. Edie Massey plays Divine's mother. She lives in a crib, is very messy, and has a passion for a particular food. What was this food?

Answer: eggs

John Waters, a reject from film school, made a career of bad taste. It is hard to think of any of his films as not being a cult film. Many of his movies starred Divine (real name Harris Glen Milstead) an obese actor who played his parts in drag. Many of the grossest parts of the movie were real, not camera tricks.
6. "El Topo" (1970) opened quietly in New York, without publicity, at midnight and was the cult sensation of the early 1970s. It was generally accepted as the first of the midnight movie genre. It was violent, bloody, and burdened with symbolism. It became a cult favorite of many celebrities. After it closed its run in the mid-1970s, it disappeared from the market. What was the reason for this?

Answer: A dispute between the director and the distributor

This is the only film in this quiz that I have not seen, except for short clips, but it was reported that John Lennon, David Lynch, and Marilyn Manson declared this as their favorite movie. The director, Alejandro Jodorowsky, did not agree with the distributor about withdrawing it from circulation, to increase its value at a later date.
7. "Repo Man" (1984) told the story of a repo man (Harry Dean Stanton) breaking in a young apprentice, played by Emilio Estevez. A repo man reclaims cars from those unfortunate people who don't make payments and who are not always happy to surrender the vehicle. A one point in the film, the trunk of a car was opened. What was found?

Answer: We never learn but it glowed.

The first part of the film was pretty straight-forward but veered to weird characters, bizarre occurances, and violence. The video game "Grand Theft Auto" was reported to be based on this movie. The glowing trunk effect was also used by Quentin Tarantino in "Pulp Fiction" but was a briefcase that time.
8. "Entertainment Weekly" rated "This Is Spinal Tap" (1984) as number one in a ranking of the fifty best cult films. It told, though a mockumentary, the strivings of a Rock and Roll Band. Who was the director?

Answer: Rob Reiner

Reiner the younger takes credit for this satire of the R&R music scene and also appeared in the film. Preview audiences sometimes did not realize that it was a satire and not real. Although it had characteristics of a midnight movie, VCR and DVD have been adopted by cult audiences in recent years.
9. "Harold and Maude" (1971) told the story of a teenager (Bud Cort) and his relationship with a 79 and three quarter year old woman (Ruth Gordon). They shared a common interest in funerals and death in general. Harold liked to play tricks on his mother. What did he do?

Answer: Faked his own death and mutilation

The May/December relationship was the heart of the movie. The Cort character represented the alienated youth of the 60s and 70s; Gordon's free spirit reflected a good deal of the war protesters' spirit of the time and the hope of social change on the horizon.
10. If a cult movie is a film that appeals to a small but devoted audience, then "Slap Shot" (1977) qualifies. Youth hockey players related to the exploits of the hapless Charlestown Chiefs. Three brothers joined the team in mid-season and turned the team's fortunes around. What was the name of these brothers?

Answer: Hansen brothers

An interesting aside was that "Slap Shot" was voted the Best Foreign Film in 1977 in Japan. The real life Hansens made a living by making personal appearences in hockey rinks all over the United States and Canada, based on their roles in the film. Paul Newman's performance, as the ageing player/coach, was the glue that held the film together. My son played youth hockey for ten years and this film has remained one of his favorites.
Source: Author Rehaberpro

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor skunkee before going online.
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