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Quiz about OneHit LABELS of the 60s USA specific
Quiz about OneHit LABELS of the 60s USA specific

One-Hit LABELS of the 60s (U.S.A. specific) Quiz


You're familiar with the term "one-hit wonder"? This quiz covers the record labels, rather than the artists, that managed this dubious feat. (Sorry I made it so hard...)

A multiple-choice quiz by SomeCallMeTim. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
399,307
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
75
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. In 1963, this label, an imprint of ABC-Paramount, saw a cover of "Misty" by an artist dubbed Mr. Personality peak at number 21 for its only Top 40 appearance. Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. The Beatles' decision not to release any singles from their eponymous 1968 double-LP (more familiarly known as The White Album) may have been instrumental in a Wisconsin garage band, the Underground Sunshine, landing a hit with their cover of "Birthday" in 1969. On what label did the only "hit" version of this tune appear? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. In early 1964, Gladys Knight & the Pips were not yet the household name they would soon become upon moving to Motown, but their talent was obvious and they had already seen success on the Vee-Jay and Fury labels. The song this time was called "Giving Up," and managed number 38 Pop (and number six R&B). What was the label? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. The Red Bird label rode the girl-group craze of the early 60s to fame, charting unforgettable tales of teen angst from the Shangri-La's, Dixie Cups and the Jelly Beans. In late 1964, it spawned a sister label that launched just one hit (but what a hit!) by the Ad Libs. That label was... Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. San Antonio's Bubble Puppy rode the wave of psychedelia during its brief period of crossover success in 1967-1970. The tune was "Hot Smoke and Sasafrass." What was the label? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The one-hit label this time bears the rather clumsy but all-inclusive moniker Fox Family - TCF - Hall. In April of 1965, it would release its only Top 40 single, a retelling of a spooky urban legend by the Tennessean who gave us "Patches" in 1962, Dickey Lee. What was the title of this song? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. The Five Americans. I know what you're thinking, but they managed three Top 40 hits for the tiny Abnak label. Their first hit, 1965's early psychedelic "I See the Light," was a hit on which label? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Esther Phillips has placed two songs in the Top 40, in two different decades, on two different labels. Both labels managed just a solitary hit thanks to Ms. Phillips' vocal talents. Which one flourished briefly in 1962, thanks to her rendition of "Release Me"? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. In 1968, Bull & the Matadors barely nudged the Top 40 with their contribution to the brief judicial craze sparked by Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In's "Here Comes the Judge" sketch. Their song was "The Funky Judge" and their label was... Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. In between his days as a solo artist and his bubblegum work with Dawn, Tony Orlando took uncredited lead with a band called Wind, which placed "Make Believe" at number 28 in late 1969. The label? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In 1963, this label, an imprint of ABC-Paramount, saw a cover of "Misty" by an artist dubbed Mr. Personality peak at number 21 for its only Top 40 appearance.

Answer: Double-L

The artist was Lloyd Price and the label's name echoed the twin consonants beginning his first name. It would be Price's and the label's final excursion into the pop Top 40, though Price would continue with moderate success on the R&B charts into the 1970s.
2. The Beatles' decision not to release any singles from their eponymous 1968 double-LP (more familiarly known as The White Album) may have been instrumental in a Wisconsin garage band, the Underground Sunshine, landing a hit with their cover of "Birthday" in 1969. On what label did the only "hit" version of this tune appear?

Answer: Intrepid

Intrepid was a subsidiary of Chicago's Mercury Records. "Birthday" would be both its and the Underground Sunshine's only Top 40 hit. The band and label further managed a solitary entry on the album charts with "Let There Be Light," the song's parent album.
3. In early 1964, Gladys Knight & the Pips were not yet the household name they would soon become upon moving to Motown, but their talent was obvious and they had already seen success on the Vee-Jay and Fury labels. The song this time was called "Giving Up," and managed number 38 Pop (and number six R&B). What was the label?

Answer: Maxx

The Maxx label was the distribution arm of Larry Maxwell Productions, and released just twelve singles in 1964 and 1965 - "Giving Up" was its second. In addition to Gladys Knight and the Pips, the label also featured new material by Ed Townsend, of 1950s "For Your Love" renown.
4. The Red Bird label rode the girl-group craze of the early 60s to fame, charting unforgettable tales of teen angst from the Shangri-La's, Dixie Cups and the Jelly Beans. In late 1964, it spawned a sister label that launched just one hit (but what a hit!) by the Ad Libs. That label was...

Answer: Blue Cat

It was Blue Cat, and the hit single it was never able to match again was "Boy from New York City." The Ad Libs managed just one further Hot 100 single for the label, "He Ain't no Angel," later in 1965.
5. San Antonio's Bubble Puppy rode the wave of psychedelia during its brief period of crossover success in 1967-1970. The tune was "Hot Smoke and Sasafrass." What was the label?

Answer: International Artists

International Artists was actually an American label owned by some Houston businessmen. In its brief lifespan (1965-1970, with a brief 1980 revival), it introduced audiences to the 13th Floor Elevators, Lightnin' Hopkins and the Red Crayolas...all of them Houston-based.
6. The one-hit label this time bears the rather clumsy but all-inclusive moniker Fox Family - TCF - Hall. In April of 1965, it would release its only Top 40 single, a retelling of a spooky urban legend by the Tennessean who gave us "Patches" in 1962, Dickey Lee. What was the title of this song?

Answer: Laurie (Strange Things Happen)

"Laurie" was the tale of a boy who meets a girl at a dance. As he escorts her home, he lends her his jacket. When he returns to the house to retrieve it, the girl's father informs the would-be beau that Laurie died a year ago. He finds his jacket draped over her grave. (I'd have bought a new jacket.)

TCF-Hall released 27 singles in 1965 and 1966. In addition to Dickey Lee, the label was also home to post-"Running Bear" Johnny Preston.
7. The Five Americans. I know what you're thinking, but they managed three Top 40 hits for the tiny Abnak label. Their first hit, 1965's early psychedelic "I See the Light," was a hit on which label?

Answer: HBR

HBR was Hanna-Barbera's foray into the music industry. If you grew up watching Saturday morning TV, you're probably familiar with their far greater success as producers of children's entertainment. The record label released singles and albums from 1965 to 1968.
8. Esther Phillips has placed two songs in the Top 40, in two different decades, on two different labels. Both labels managed just a solitary hit thanks to Ms. Phillips' vocal talents. Which one flourished briefly in 1962, thanks to her rendition of "Release Me"?

Answer: Lenox

Phillips scored the first hit with what would later become Engelbert Humperdinck's signature song. It was the Lenox label's first release, despite a catalog number of 5555. She'd return in the 70s with a disco version of "What a Diff'rence a Day Makes."
9. In 1968, Bull & the Matadors barely nudged the Top 40 with their contribution to the brief judicial craze sparked by Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In's "Here Comes the Judge" sketch. Their song was "The Funky Judge" and their label was...

Answer: Toddlin' Town

Toddlin' Town Records was named for the then-not-unknown sobriquet for Chicago, from a song dating to 1922 and most popularized by Frank Sinatra in his 1957 rendition. Of the 39 singles released in its six-year lifespan, this would be its only pop Top 40 hit.
10. In between his days as a solo artist and his bubblegum work with Dawn, Tony Orlando took uncredited lead with a band called Wind, which placed "Make Believe" at number 28 in late 1969. The label?

Answer: Life

It was the tiny Life label, which released just three singles, all of them in 1969, and two of them by Wind. (The other was "Lord" by an artist known as Spencer Barefoot.)
Source: Author SomeCallMeTim

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