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Quiz about Festa Italiana
Quiz about Festa Italiana

Festa Italiana Trivia Quiz


You are at a very Italian party for Italians only (even though you may not be). At this party are famous Italians (and others) from throughout history. Can you identify who is there (or not supposed to be!)?

A multiple-choice quiz by George95. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
George95
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
346,040
Updated
Feb 14 24
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
5178
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: pusdoc (9/10), tosca17 (8/10), Johnmcmanners (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Upon arrival, you start up a conversation with somebody who seems familiar from your school textbooks. Your nervousness gets to you, and struggling to figure out something to ask this man, you ask "How did you get here", to which he replies "I walked, I always walk or march. I'll always remember walking in to Rome back in 1922.". "That's it", you think. Who is this man? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. So as you get brought to your table, your hostess shows you past two tables with only one person sitting at them. The next table has two people, and the next three, the next five, the next eight. The table he seats you at has twelve, and as you sit, he says, "Good, with you that's thirteen. Now to seat the next twenty-one people." You think, "There's only one person who would sit us this way, and that's _______." Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. As you sit down to eat, you can't help but notice the guy sitting beside you keeps staring up at the ceiling. Eventually, your curiosity gets to you, and you ask if he is all right, to which he replies "I painted a ceiling before, made it look all good too. Took four years, I can't help but look up now, expecting to see my work". What Renaissance man is sitting next to you? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. As you're about to dig into an enormous helping of gelato, your neighbour across the table spits his mouthful out. "I must have a word with the chef!" he exclaims. "This is Genoan gelato. I must eat only Florentine food, and I'm willing to pay very good money to have it modeled after my face!"

Who is this "magnificent" ruler of the 1440s?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. As he was sitting enjoying an antipasto with pepperoni, olives, chunks of various cheeses and cubes of a specific meat, this mariner said, "This plate make me so homesick". Who was he? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. A loud slurping sound from the other side of the table alarms you of the presence of nondescript young man rapidly gulping his minestrone soup. His tablemates seem repulsed by his bad manners, and draw back, as though afraid that they might be the next to be eaten. The good-natured man notices their expressions and concedes, "Alas! I suppose it is better to be feared than loved, if one cannot be both." After saying this he resumes eating.

Who was this philosopher, best known for a political tract giving advice to a royal ruler?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. For some of us who aren't in to the exotic and expensive foods, you have a more basic table with different dishes. The Italian inventor, known as the "Father of Modern Radio" visited here and, fittingly, walked away with what on his plate? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. After your lovely dinner, the evening's entertainment began. You were blinded by being able to hear, in the flesh, one of the internationally best-known singers since 1994 when he won the Newcomers section of the Sanremo Music Festival. Who is this marvellous tenor? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. "Bring on the opera!" someone shouts from behind you. The strains of Wagnerian overtures burst forth from the stage, to the cacophonous sounds of whistles and hisses. Someone hollers, "This is the land of opera! Dare you bring in that noise? Play some Puccini!" With that request, the overture of one of Giacomo Puccini's most famous works luxuriously emanates from the stage. Of these four, which will the opera NOT be? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. To end the night, four phenomenally talented opera singers took to the stage to do some of their trademark songs. You have Maria Callas, Enrico Caruso, Montserrat Caballe, and Nellie Melba all attempting to outstage the rest. But soon the stage director storms on and says to three of them, "How did you get in here? You're not Italiani!" and drags them all off in embarrassment. That left whom to finish the gig all alone? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Upon arrival, you start up a conversation with somebody who seems familiar from your school textbooks. Your nervousness gets to you, and struggling to figure out something to ask this man, you ask "How did you get here", to which he replies "I walked, I always walk or march. I'll always remember walking in to Rome back in 1922.". "That's it", you think. Who is this man?

Answer: Benito Mussolini

Mussolini became Prime Minister in 1922, after his "March on Rome", a seven day long march from October 22 to 29, 1922. Mussolini remained in power until 1943, when his Grand Council of Fascism dismissed him, following the Allied invasion of Italy in World War II. Mussolini was imprisoned, but was rescued by German special forces in the Gran Sasso Raid. On April 28, 1945, "Il Duce" was captured by Italian partisans while attempting to flee to neighbouring and neutral Switzerland.

He was executed, and his corpse was hanged upside down at a Milan gas station for public viewing.
2. So as you get brought to your table, your hostess shows you past two tables with only one person sitting at them. The next table has two people, and the next three, the next five, the next eight. The table he seats you at has twelve, and as you sit, he says, "Good, with you that's thirteen. Now to seat the next twenty-one people." You think, "There's only one person who would sit us this way, and that's _______."

Answer: Leonardo Fibonacci

Fibonacci's sequence (0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34 ...) is obtained by each number being the sum of the previous two in the sequence. He is not the originator of the sequence; he merely introduced it to Western civilization in the 12th century.
3. As you sit down to eat, you can't help but notice the guy sitting beside you keeps staring up at the ceiling. Eventually, your curiosity gets to you, and you ask if he is all right, to which he replies "I painted a ceiling before, made it look all good too. Took four years, I can't help but look up now, expecting to see my work". What Renaissance man is sitting next to you?

Answer: Michelangelo

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni was born on March 6, 1475 and considered the greatest painter of his lifetime and one of the best of all time. Michelangelo started work on the Sistine Chapel's ceiling in 1508, a job that took him four years to complete. According to Michelangelo himself, rival painters Bramante and Raphael convinced Pope Julius II to give the job to Michelangelo because it was a medium unfamiliar to any of them, and hoping that Michelangelo would do a bad job, hurting his reputation.

This story is not been accepted by modern historians.
4. As you're about to dig into an enormous helping of gelato, your neighbour across the table spits his mouthful out. "I must have a word with the chef!" he exclaims. "This is Genoan gelato. I must eat only Florentine food, and I'm willing to pay very good money to have it modeled after my face!" Who is this "magnificent" ruler of the 1440s?

Answer: Lorenzo de' Medici

During the Italian Renaissance, Lorenzo de' Medici was the de facto ruler of the Florentine Republic. During the 16th century, and de' Medici's reign, gelato was served for the first time, to the ruler himself. Gelato is the Italian word for ice cream, made from milk, cream and different sugars, and flavours. Medici died in 1492, at the age of 43.
5. As he was sitting enjoying an antipasto with pepperoni, olives, chunks of various cheeses and cubes of a specific meat, this mariner said, "This plate make me so homesick". Who was he?

Answer: Christopher Columbus

The man credited with discovering the New World was looking at the Genoa salami on the antipasto plate thinking of his birthplace in Genoa, Italy. He was born on Hallowe'en in 1451 and died in 1506. His most famous voyage would most probably be the one in 1492 with the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, although he made more voyages to the New World.
6. A loud slurping sound from the other side of the table alarms you of the presence of nondescript young man rapidly gulping his minestrone soup. His tablemates seem repulsed by his bad manners, and draw back, as though afraid that they might be the next to be eaten. The good-natured man notices their expressions and concedes, "Alas! I suppose it is better to be feared than loved, if one cannot be both." After saying this he resumes eating. Who was this philosopher, best known for a political tract giving advice to a royal ruler?

Answer: Niccolo Machiavelli

Born it Florence, Machiavelli was a philosopher who revolutionized modern political science. A staple in many college programs, his book, "The Prince", is one of the first books written on modern political philosophy. The term "Machiavellian" is used still to this day as one who feels the ends justify the means, no matter how ruthless.
7. For some of us who aren't in to the exotic and expensive foods, you have a more basic table with different dishes. The Italian inventor, known as the "Father of Modern Radio" visited here and, fittingly, walked away with what on his plate?

Answer: "Marconi" and Cheese

Guglielmo Marconi is often credited as being the inventor of the radio, as well as the founder of a radio telegraph system, and Marconi's Law, the relation between the height of antennae and the maximum signalling distance. Marconi was a co-winner the 1909 Nobel Prize for Physics, and was ennobled in 1924, becoming Marchese Marconi.
8. After your lovely dinner, the evening's entertainment began. You were blinded by being able to hear, in the flesh, one of the internationally best-known singers since 1994 when he won the Newcomers section of the Sanremo Music Festival. Who is this marvellous tenor?

Answer: Andrea Bocelli

Andrea Bocelli was born with poor eyesight but, after a sporting accident at age 12, became blind. He has not only performed in opera, but has made a great mark in cross-over music. Bocelli is also quite a musician being skilled on at least ten instruments. Luciano Pavarotti plyed a somewhat mentor role for him. A wonderful all around musician, despite his serious handicap.
9. "Bring on the opera!" someone shouts from behind you. The strains of Wagnerian overtures burst forth from the stage, to the cacophonous sounds of whistles and hisses. Someone hollers, "This is the land of opera! Dare you bring in that noise? Play some Puccini!" With that request, the overture of one of Giacomo Puccini's most famous works luxuriously emanates from the stage. Of these four, which will the opera NOT be?

Answer: I Pagliacci

"I Pagliacci" is an opera by Ruggero Leoncavallo, who was not nearly as prolific at Rossini or Giuseppe Verdi, but did produce one of the most identifiable solos in "Vesti La Giubba", often used to portray sadness and loss in melodramatic moments. No disrespect to Wagner, but you are in Italy.
10. To end the night, four phenomenally talented opera singers took to the stage to do some of their trademark songs. You have Maria Callas, Enrico Caruso, Montserrat Caballe, and Nellie Melba all attempting to outstage the rest. But soon the stage director storms on and says to three of them, "How did you get in here? You're not Italiani!" and drags them all off in embarrassment. That left whom to finish the gig all alone?

Answer: Enrico Caruso

All four can wow a crowd with their voices, but Callas was actually born in the United States and is of Greek heritage. Montserrat Caballe was born in Spain. Nellie Melba is an Australian. Naples-born Enrico Caruso is the first great Italian opera tenor, long before "The Three Tenors" were in existence. His recording of "Vesti La Giubba" was the first platinum selling recording, achieving one million copies.
Source: Author George95

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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