FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Stateside Writing
Quiz about Stateside Writing

Stateside Writing Trivia Quiz


In this quiz, I'll give you the name and some information about American authors, and you choose the state they're from. All locations are states or districts within the United States. Good luck!

A photo quiz by PootyPootwell. Estimated time: 3 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. People Trivia
  6. »
  7. Writers & Authors
  8. »
  9. Writers and Places

Time
3 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
395,199
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Very Easy
Avg Score
10 / 10
Plays
493
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: polly656 (10/10), dee1304 (10/10), Guest 175 (8/10).
-
Question 1 of 10
1. John Steinbeck had deep roots in his home state, and he wrote about farmers making their way to this location from Oklahoma in his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "The Grapes of Wrath." In what sunny state was Steinbeck born? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Flannery O'Connor is considered a Southern Gothic writer who lived much of her short life in Milledgeville. Her state is named after the British King who granted it a charter in 1732. What is the name of this state? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Bill Bryson may speak with a British accent for all the years he spent in the United Kingdom, but he was born in a midwestern state, the same one where President Hoover and Elijah Wood were born. What is the name of this state? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Anne Rice is a prolific writer who was written books in various genres and is particularly known for her books about the vampire Lestat. Her home state has both Cajun and Creole roots. What is it? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote a famous book set in his home state, which is called the Bay State. It's associated with infamous witch trials of the late 1600s. What is the name of this state? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Willa Cather, chronicler of life on the American frontier, was born in a state that was the location of one of the earliest European settlements in America. What is the name of this state, which was named after Elizabeth I? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Hemingway wrote that all American novels trace their roots to Mark Twain, a native of the "Show Me State." What is the name of this midwestern state that is also the setting for the thriller "Gone Girl"? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Michael Chabon may be famous for his first novel, "The Mysteries of Pittsburgh ", but he was born in a different location just south of the Mason-Dixon line. What is the name of his home, named after an important American president? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Ralph Waldo Ellison, author of "Invisible Man", was named after Ralph Waldo Emerson, as Ellison's father loved literature. His home state has a musical named after it, and it was where the migrants in Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" launched their sad journey. What is the name of this state? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Stephen King sets the vast majority of his stories in his home state, which is known for its rocky coastline and snowy winters. What is his home state, which borders Canada? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




View Image Attributions for This Quiz

Most Recent Scores
Jun 21 2024 : polly656: 10/10
Jun 03 2024 : dee1304: 10/10
May 28 2024 : Guest 175: 8/10
May 12 2024 : briarwoodrose: 10/10
May 08 2024 : PurpleComet: 10/10
Apr 30 2024 : pointparkchic: 10/10

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. John Steinbeck had deep roots in his home state, and he wrote about farmers making their way to this location from Oklahoma in his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "The Grapes of Wrath." In what sunny state was Steinbeck born?

Answer: California

John Steinbeck was born to German immigrants in Salinas, California, which was a center for agricultural growing and trading. He studied at Stanford for a while and traveled around the U.S. as he worked on his writing. His first novel, "Cup of Gold: A Life of Sir Henry Morgan, Buccaneer, with Occasional Reference to History" was a pirate adventure story published in 1929.

This image is of California poppies, the state flower. It is illegal to pick this flower.
2. Flannery O'Connor is considered a Southern Gothic writer who lived much of her short life in Milledgeville. Her state is named after the British King who granted it a charter in 1732. What is the name of this state?

Answer: Georgia

O'Connor wrote with passion, and critics have said she may have been influenced by knowing she had a serious disease, lupus. Her story "A Good Man is Hard to Find" is often anthologized. Its theme, that divine grace can be found everywhere, even behind violence, is a tenet of the southern Gothic movement.

This image is of a peach tree; George is known as the peach state.
3. Bill Bryson may speak with a British accent for all the years he spent in the United Kingdom, but he was born in a midwestern state, the same one where President Hoover and Elijah Wood were born. What is the name of this state?

Answer: Iowa

Des Moines is the capital of Iowa and the home town of Bill Bryson, who has written multiple books, with "Notes from a Small Island" a particularly popular one. He traveled to Europe while on a break from college, and fell in love with a British psychiatrist nurse. They married, and he has split his time between the U.S. and the U.K.

Not all Iowans (my mother included) like being associated with corn, but Iowa corn really is delicious! Iowa produces more corn than any other state, generally.
4. Anne Rice is a prolific writer who was written books in various genres and is particularly known for her books about the vampire Lestat. Her home state has both Cajun and Creole roots. What is it?

Answer: Louisiana

Anne Rice was born in New Orleans, "The Big Easy" city in Louisiana. Although she lived and studied in San Francisco and Berkeley, she returned to New Orleans after finding success as a published writer. Louisiana is a state largely influenced by the giant Mississippi River that runs through it, as well as its Cajun and Creole roots. Cajuns are descendants of French who settled in the area in the late 1600s. Creole refers to people with background that mixes French, African, Spanish, and Native American culture and can include other European heritages as well.

This image is of a bayou, or a marsh.
5. Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote a famous book set in his home state, which is called the Bay State. It's associated with infamous witch trials of the late 1600s. What is the name of this state?

Answer: Massachusetts

Massachusetts is one of the original colonies and is rich with American history; American students learn how the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock in Massachusetts. Hawthorne was born in Salem in 1804, the son of a sea captain who died when Nathaniel was young. An uncle watched over him and sent him to college at Bowdoin.

Hawthorne wrote the literary classic "The Scarlet Letter."
6. Willa Cather, chronicler of life on the American frontier, was born in a state that was the location of one of the earliest European settlements in America. What is the name of this state, which was named after Elizabeth I?

Answer: Virginia

Virginia has been the setting for many important vents in U.S. history. Cather was the eldest of seven and a sixth-generation Virginian on her father's side. Despite those deep roots, the family relocated to Nebraska. Cather began her writing career with a magazine, then moved to short stories and novels. She won the Pulitzer Prize for her 1922 novel "One of Ours."

This image is of a statue of the Virgin Mary. Elizabeth I was known as the Virgin Queen.
7. Hemingway wrote that all American novels trace their roots to Mark Twain, a native of the "Show Me State." What is the name of this midwestern state that is also the setting for the thriller "Gone Girl"?

Answer: Missouri

Mark Twain was born in the small town of Florida, Missouri. It had fewer than 100 people at the time of his birth in 1835, and has been considered essentially uninhabited for decades. Missouri was a launching point for the U.S.'s westward expansion. Though not a flashy state, Missouri has spawned many people important to American culture, including Chuck Berry, T.S. Eliot, Walt Disney, and of course Twain.

This is a picture of a famous U.S. landmark, the St. Louis arch.
8. Michael Chabon may be famous for his first novel, "The Mysteries of Pittsburgh ", but he was born in a different location just south of the Mason-Dixon line. What is the name of his home, named after an important American president?

Answer: Washington, D.C.

The United States is made up of 50 states plus one district, and that district is the District of Columbia, also called Washington, D.C. Named after the first President, George Washington, D.C. was described by another president, John F. Kennedy, as "a city of Southern efficiency and Northern charm." This is funny to people who understand the perceptions of the two regions, as Southerners are considering charming and Northerners are considered no-nonsense do-ers. Michael Chabon was born to a lawyer mother and a doctor/lawyer father in 1963. He has won the O. Henry Award, a Pulitzer, and a Hugo.

This is an image of some of the most famous residents of Washington, D.C., from the National Zoo.
9. Ralph Waldo Ellison, author of "Invisible Man", was named after Ralph Waldo Emerson, as Ellison's father loved literature. His home state has a musical named after it, and it was where the migrants in Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" launched their sad journey. What is the name of this state?

Answer: Oklahoma

Oklahoma is called "The Sooner State" because of the people who rushed in sooner than expected to claim land. Ellison lost his literature-loving father as a boy, and the family stayed afloat financially while Ellison worked as a busboy, a waiter, and a dentist's assistant. He was admitted at age 20 to the famous Tuskegee Institute.

The musical "Oklahoma!" has a famous song in it titled "The Surrey with the Fringe on Top."
10. Stephen King sets the vast majority of his stories in his home state, which is known for its rocky coastline and snowy winters. What is his home state, which borders Canada?

Answer: Maine

Stephen King has set many of his novels in Maine, where he was born in 1947. He has reported his deep affection for his state, but not so much for the small town of Durham, where he spent a rough part of his childhood. His father had left the family, and his mother worked very hard to support Stephen and his brother David. King graduated from the University of Maine. He is married to writer Tabitha King and two of his three children are also published writers.

Maine is also known for its seafood, particularly its lobsters.
Source: Author PootyPootwell

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
6/24/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us