Quiz about BBB Bible Series The 1st Letter To Corinth
Quiz about BBB Bible Series The 1st Letter To Corinth

BBB Bible Series: The 1st Letter To Corinth Quiz


Yet another effort in our team's goal of covering ALL of the Bible, book by book, quiz by quiz. This one focuses on the apostle Paul's first letter to the church at Corinth.

A multiple-choice quiz by logcrawler. Estimated time: 10 mins.
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Author
logcrawler
Time
10 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
353,452
Updated
Dec 03 21
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20
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Average
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Last 3 plays: Guest 66 (14/20), Guest 45 (15/20), Guest 207 (16/20).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. The church in the city of Corinth had problems on top of problems. The apostle Paul wrote to them several times concerning existing issues, as well as having to address new situations that arose later. The book of 1st Corinthians was the first time he wrote them about serious matters that were going on in the church.

True
False

2. Oh, the problems! The city was filled to the brim with shrines and temples, mostly to Greek gods and goddess. The temple of Aphrodite (from which we get the word, "aphrodisiac"), was the most prominent, standing on an 1,800 foot promontory called the Acrocorinthus. What had former worshippers of Aphrodite used in their worship practices? (Hint: read the question carefully.) Hint

drums and gongs
consecrated prostitutes
sacrifices of monkeys
blasts of trumpets

3. Not all of Paul's words were of a scolding nature, nor was he totally displeased with the church, although he did have a number of things to correct them on. When he began the epistle (letter) of 1st Corinthians, what words of encouragement did he start with in 1:4? Hint

"Many among you are faithful in all things, and for that I express my approval"
"God shall confirm you and keep you from all harm"
"May God extend his love to you for upholding His precepts and believing His promises"
"I thank my God always on your behalf for the grace of God which is given you by Jesus Christ"

4. Ah. Here we are. The very first thing that Paul had to make an effort to correct in the thinking of the faithful of Corinth.

Some of the people seemed to suffer from the delusion that Paul was "the greatest thing since sliced bread." Others felt that another man was the greater one to follow, while another sect thought that they should follow yet another man's teachings. Paul had to set them straight in verses 10-17 and tell them that CHRIST should be their primary focus, and not him or the other two men mentioned. What were these men's names?
Hint

Barnabas and Mark
Jude and John
Luke and Matthew
Apollos and Cephas

5. The Jewish people required a 'sign' from above, and the Greeks almost worshipped 'wisdom' religiously, according to 1 Corinthians 1:22. (The gnostic teachings of the Greeks meant "knowledge", albeit of a secular nature.)
Paul addressed both of these teachings, wisdom-seeking and sign-seeking, in a particular manner. What did he have to say about them in verses 23-27?
Hint

all power of wisdom is of God through Christ, not of man's efforts
God was not pleased with man's attempts to subvert His authority
man can only understand knowledge as it relates to medicine
not everyone in the church was correct in their assumptions

6. Paul speaks further about heavenly wisdom later in chapter 2, verses 6-16. In verse 8 he points out that the 'princes of this world' did not know anything about such knowledge. What does he say would have been the end result if they had been aware of it? Hint

they would have repented long ago
they would not have crucified the Lord of glory
they would stop resisting the church
they would be more likely to enter heaven

7. Carnal. Spiritual. What did Paul mean as he applied these words to the believers in Corinth? Hint

he was pointing out the difference between earthly thoughts and heavenly thoughts
he merely meant that they were likely to revert to heathenism
he was being deliberately insulting in order to get their attention
he felt that they were totally hopeless cases; useless as Christians

8. In Paul's day, the population of Corinth was fairly large, consisting of about 700,000 people, some of whom were slaves. How many of the residents of the city were enslaved? Hint

9/10
less than 1/10
about 2/3
roughly 1/2

9. In the fourth chapter of the book of 1st Corinthians, Paul has to address some of those who feel that he is too full of "self-importance"; just the opposite of those who think that he is "the greatest". Some among the congregation had also apparently begun to think that their group was "better" than other factions within the church itself. What does Paul ask them in verse 7? Hint

"Which of you is better than Christ?"
"Is there any among you who has a better understanding than I?"
"There is no profit in acting so foolishly. Why do so?"
"For who maketh thee to differ from another?"

10. More problems!
A litigious bunch, these church members just seemed to LOVE to sue anyone, including each other! Frequently they would take each other to court over the most trivial matters.
Paul had to address this type of behavior in his letter as well. In what chapter of 1 Corinthians did he do so?
Hint

6th
5th
9th
7th

11. Paul had already addressed the issue of sexual immorality with his example of how to handle the situation with the man who was involved with his father's wife, but he had to revisit the topic in the latter part of chapter 6. Here, his aim seems to be directed in a more general way. Apparently this was not merely an isolated incident, and others were engaged in sexual promiscuities of their own. What does Paul say regarding the value of the human body of a Christian? Hint

it is more valuable than gold
it really doesn't concern anyone else
as a temple it belongs to God
the only value the body has is to produce offspring

12. There was a faction among the inhabitants of Corinth that actually discouraged people from getting married, claiming that it was a sin to do so.
How did Paul address this issue, in 1 Corinthians 7:28?
Hint

He plainly stated that there was no sin in getting married
He acknowledged the sin, but said that it could be forgiven
He said that the only sin involved was that of adultery
His statement did not address sin in marriage; only outside of marriage

13. A common practice of the city of Corinth and surrounding regions was the eating of foodstuffs that had been offered to idol gods previously. I suppose that since the idols couldn't eat it (after all, they weren't exactly alive), the rationale must have been something like this, "There is no need in allowing perfectly good food to go to waste."
Some people in the church took issue with other members of the congregation who engaged in such behavior. What feelings does Paul express about it, in chapter 8 of 1 Corinthians?
Hint

he is adamantly opposed to the concept
he feels that it should never occur for any reason except when the food was also offered to God
it's not a big deal, unless you know it to have been offered to idols first, and unless someone else is hurt by the action
he approves of idol worship as being necessary and he engages in the practice also

14. In the 9th chapter of 1 Corinthians, Paul states the obvious: that he is a Jew. What else does he say about himself, in verses 19-22? Hint

that he believes that Christ was a good example to follow, and that he acknowledges His word
that he is a descendant of Benjamin and that his strength comes from Roman authority
that he is a representative of gentiles and that he is weak
that he knows the truth and the truth will set people free, and that he is mighty in Christ

15. One of my personal favorite verses in the entire Bible is found in 1 Corinthians chapter 10. It speaks of temptations and Paul enumerates a listing of those that faced the children of Israel as they escaped the bondage of Egypt, centuries before his birth. In verse 13, what particularly does he have to say about such temptations? Hint

the devil tempts everyone, and no one is perfect
all people are different and not all are tempted the same way, and Jesus was also tempted
everyone is tempted in much the same manner, but God provides an "escape route"
no one is immune to temptation, but sheer will-power can be used to combat it

16. Well, it seems that Paul was not through with addressing issues of food and drink. What did he have to say about things sacrificed to idols, in chapter 10, verses 14-21? Hint

do not have fellowship with devils; eat as you please, but not with knowledge of things that have been sacrificed to idols
Jesus is the bread of life; so all foods belong to Him and there are no demons to worry about
it doesn't matter what a person eats or drinks; only that they say grace over their food
flee from idolatry; but if your neighbor offers food that has been offered to idols, eat with him and convert him to Christ

17. Paul addressed the issue of abuse of the Lord's supper in chapter 11 of 1st Corinthians. In what ways were some of the people involved failing to honor God with their actions? Hint

they were holding candlelight vigils to false gods and swearing loudly
many were laughing while participating and entertaining each other with ribald jokes
some were taking up collections for charity for themselves and lying
they were getting drunk and allowing people to go hungry while others stuffed themselves

18. Paul covers the topic of the "body" of Christ in chapter 12 of 1st Corinthians. What does he say about the body of believers that allegorically represents the body of Christ, in verse 12-14? Hint

the body of Christ is the same as the body of Adam
not every part of the body is necessary for the betterment of the whole
only the best-behaved men and women are part of the body of Christ
the body is one entity with many members

19. The 13th chapter of 1st Corinthians is often referred to as "The Love Chapter." Love is called "charity" in the King James Version, but the meaning is clearly the same. Which of the following aspects or facets of love is NOT mentioned in this chapter? Hint

love never fails
love hopes for all things
love is not envious
love is self-centered

20. Most everyone who has read at least some portion of the Bible, and may have studied a little bit about Christ's ministry on Earth, has been told that He was resurrected on the third day. Many people believe that He appeared to His disciples, Mary Magdalene, and others after His resurrection. Paul also claims to have seen Him, much later on the road to Damascus. In 1 Corinthians 15:4-6, though, Paul states a specific number of people who saw the resurrected Christ besides all these folks. How many people did he say that Christ once appeared to, all at the same time? Hint

over 500
exactly 120
about 80
nearly forty


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The church in the city of Corinth had problems on top of problems. The apostle Paul wrote to them several times concerning existing issues, as well as having to address new situations that arose later. The book of 1st Corinthians was the first time he wrote them about serious matters that were going on in the church.

Answer: False

No, this was not the first occasion that Paul used to speak with the members of the church of Corinth. According to his own words in 1st Corinthians 5:9, we read the following statement:

"I wrote unto you in an epistle not to company with fornicators:"

This was a remonstrance concerning a man WITHIN the church who had apparently engaged in a most disturbing type of sexual sin. The entire chapter is devoted to how the church SHOULD have dealt with the situation, rather than compromising its position. Without getting too grossly explicit, the man had been having a relationship with his father's wife (probably his step-mother).

Paul said in essence:
Stop.
Deal with him.
Do NOT allow God's church to suffer embarrassment.
Remove him from your midst.
He should repent; if not, quit associating with him.
2. Oh, the problems! The city was filled to the brim with shrines and temples, mostly to Greek gods and goddess. The temple of Aphrodite (from which we get the word, "aphrodisiac"), was the most prominent, standing on an 1,800 foot promontory called the Acrocorinthus. What had former worshippers of Aphrodite used in their worship practices? (Hint: read the question carefully.)

Answer: consecrated prostitutes

Yes, at one time there had been 1,000 prostitutes called Hieroduli that were dedicated to "service" in the Temple of Aphrodite. The city had long thrived on commerce, vice and corruption. Hedonists (pleasure-seekers) came from all over the region to spend a holiday from morality, and while there they engaged in such evil acts that to be called a "Korinthiazomai" (meaning to act like a Corinthian) became synonymous with debauchery and prostitution.

While the practice of visiting the "girls" in the temple may have abated a few centuries before Paul's address to the church at Corinth, the mind-set and the methods were still well known to the people of the city.

Paul had to spend a good deal of his address to the church in dealing with the lack of morality of the city, which was rapidly rubbing off onto the church that stood in its midst.
3. Not all of Paul's words were of a scolding nature, nor was he totally displeased with the church, although he did have a number of things to correct them on. When he began the epistle (letter) of 1st Corinthians, what words of encouragement did he start with in 1:4?

Answer: "I thank my God always on your behalf for the grace of God which is given you by Jesus Christ"

Paul tells the people of Corinth that he thanks God for them for the grace that God has extended to them. He seems to be trying to prepare them for the not-so-flattering things that he knows he must tell them shortly in the letter, and is using this opportunity to tell them the "good" things that will enable them to hear the "bad" things without being totally offended.

In verses 4-9, we see his prayer of thanksgiving that is directed to them, preparatory to the first problem that he feels forced to address.
4. Ah. Here we are. The very first thing that Paul had to make an effort to correct in the thinking of the faithful of Corinth. Some of the people seemed to suffer from the delusion that Paul was "the greatest thing since sliced bread." Others felt that another man was the greater one to follow, while another sect thought that they should follow yet another man's teachings. Paul had to set them straight in verses 10-17 and tell them that CHRIST should be their primary focus, and not him or the other two men mentioned. What were these men's names?

Answer: Apollos and Cephas

Apollos, a Greek convert to Christianity, and Cephas (Kee-phas), also known as Peter, who had been a Jewish disciple of Christ, were also busy working in the early church. Divisions had sprung up among the members at Corinth as to which one was the greatest to follow, and Paul simply had to tell them that it was Christ that they should be following and NOT personalities of their "favorite" evangelists.

Perhaps some folks today might be wise to recall this concept, as they view only their "favorite" televangelist, or abruptly change the church they attend, just to follow along with their "favorite" pastor.
5. The Jewish people required a 'sign' from above, and the Greeks almost worshipped 'wisdom' religiously, according to 1 Corinthians 1:22. (The gnostic teachings of the Greeks meant "knowledge", albeit of a secular nature.) Paul addressed both of these teachings, wisdom-seeking and sign-seeking, in a particular manner. What did he have to say about them in verses 23-27?

Answer: all power of wisdom is of God through Christ, not of man's efforts

Rather than rewriting all the verses involved, as I believe that you are quite capable of reading them on your own, I would like to emphasize a couple of things found in verses 24 and 27.

"But unto them which are CALLED, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God."

And,

"But God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise..."

God must CALL any man to repentance before man can respond. If I don't call you on the phone, you cannot answer, now can you? That seems to be the concept used in verse 24. Since God calls ALL men everywhere to repent, then it falls upon us to respond either negatively or positively TO that call.

Man's 'wisdom' is profoundly un-wise; but Paul says God's perfect wisdom can guide a person through any circumstance if that person's spirit aligns itself up with HIS spirit.

Paul chooses to end this chapter with a praise to God. "...He that glorieth, let him glory in the Lord."
6. Paul speaks further about heavenly wisdom later in chapter 2, verses 6-16. In verse 8 he points out that the 'princes of this world' did not know anything about such knowledge. What does he say would have been the end result if they had been aware of it?

Answer: they would not have crucified the Lord of glory

Verse 8 states: "Which none of the princes of this world knew; for had they known it, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory." These "princes" referred to in this text are probably not human princes as we might think, but may actually be "princes of darkness", embued with a certain amount of demonic powers.

In the prophetic book of Daniel, chapter 10:12-13, we see a "prince" who interfered with an answer to Daniel's prayer that had been answered by God, and it took the archangel Michael and another angelic "prince" to get the answer delivered to Daniel.
"Then said he unto me, Fear not, Daniel: for from the first day that thou didst set thine heart to understand, and to chasten thyself before thy God, thy words were heard, and I am come for thy words. But the prince of the kingdom of Persia withstood me one and twenty days: but, lo, Michael, one of the chief princes, came to help me; and I remained there with the kings of Persia."

Principalities, as spoken of in Romans 8:38-39, are angelic beings. Some are fallen angels that were cast out with Lucifer from heaven, while others are those who remained loyal to God during the war in heaven that Lucifer started before the world began. "For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, Nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord."

Lucifer or Satan is called the prince of the power of the air as in Ephesians 2:2:
"Wherein in time past ye walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience:"

And in Daniel he is referred to as the prince of princes in 8:25.

Principalities, powers, thrones, dominions, as seen in Colossians 1:16, may be interpreted as angelic beings as well. "For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him:"

One third of heaven's angels were cast out during Lucifer's rebellion in heaven, and today we call them demons. The remaining two thirds we call angels.

"And there was war in heaven: Michael and his angels fought against the dragon; and the dragon fought and his angels, And prevailed not; neither was their place found any more in heaven. And the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him." (Revelation 12:7-9)

While Jesus was in heaven He had observed Satan's fall to earth and later described it to 70 of His disciples in Luke 10:17-18. "And the seventy returned again with joy, saying, Lord, even the devils are subject unto us through thy name. And he said unto them, I beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven."
7. Carnal. Spiritual. What did Paul mean as he applied these words to the believers in Corinth?

Answer: he was pointing out the difference between earthly thoughts and heavenly thoughts

Paul is addressing the people of the church as "little babies"; not in an effort to belittle or demean them, but to cause them to want to grow in God's grace. In chapter 3, he repeatedly points out to them that they are immature in their thinking, at least from a spiritual perspective, and encourages them to put their "spiritual eyes" into action.

In verse 3 he pointedly tells them that they are walking "carnally", meaning after fleshly desires. They are engaged in envious behaviours, in-fighting, divisions of opinions; they are attempting to follow men rather than Christ.

He continues throughout the chapter by encouraging them to lay aside their differences and work together for the sake of Christ, and not for their own selfish purposes. He brings Jesus to the forefront of the entire discussion and lets them know that HE is preeminent in all things, and that they, along with Apollos, Peter and himself are all to be in subjection to the will of God and not engaging in their childish behaviors.
8. In Paul's day, the population of Corinth was fairly large, consisting of about 700,000 people, some of whom were slaves. How many of the residents of the city were enslaved?

Answer: about 2/3

About 2/3 of the population lived in slavery. There were no "great thinkers" in the area, but Greek philosophy influenced any creative thinking that there was in the region. These factors, along with sensual and immoral attitudes of the city, greatly impeded the gospel at times, but through Paul's oversight and that of others, the church was able to continue functioning, if not thriving.
9. In the fourth chapter of the book of 1st Corinthians, Paul has to address some of those who feel that he is too full of "self-importance"; just the opposite of those who think that he is "the greatest". Some among the congregation had also apparently begun to think that their group was "better" than other factions within the church itself. What does Paul ask them in verse 7?

Answer: "For who maketh thee to differ from another?"

In this segment of Paul's letter, he is continuing to address the issue that some elevate him above Apollos, and that some elevate themselves above other members, and he concludes this passage by telling them that those who are ministering to them are in a state of suffering, despised, hungry, thirsty, and weak. He further tells them that THEY are the strong ones in Christ, that they have places to live and that they are much better off than he or Apollos. He begins his conclusion by telling them this, in verse 14-15: "I write not these things to shame you, but as my beloved sons I warn you. For though you have ten thousand instructors in Christ, yet have not many fathers: for in Christ Jesus I have begotten you through the gospel."

Later he speaks directly to those who are acting as if he doesn't care about them, and he is only out to "make a name" for himself. In verse 18-19, he tells them - "Now some are puffed up, as though I would not come to you, But I will come to you shortly, if the Lord will, and will know, not the speech of them that are puffed up, but the power."
10. More problems! A litigious bunch, these church members just seemed to LOVE to sue anyone, including each other! Frequently they would take each other to court over the most trivial matters. Paul had to address this type of behavior in his letter as well. In what chapter of 1 Corinthians did he do so?

Answer: 6th

In the first part of the 6th chapter we see Paul essentially telling the church members to cease and desist with such behavior. He points out to them that they are wrong to take each other as believers in Christ to those who are non-believers outside the church in the secular courts. One reason for this is the obvious spiritual brother-against-brother mentality that creates a divisive atmosphere within the church body itself, but perhaps another equally disturbing concern of Paul may have been that the church was giving itself a bad name in the public eye by engaging in such actions.

After he finishes scolding them roundly for this unbecoming behavior, he then reminds them of their roots. In verses 9-11, he tells them the following:

"Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with mankind, nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor extortioners, shall inherit the kingdom of God?
And such were some of you, but ye are washed, but ye are sanctified, but ye are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God."
11. Paul had already addressed the issue of sexual immorality with his example of how to handle the situation with the man who was involved with his father's wife, but he had to revisit the topic in the latter part of chapter 6. Here, his aim seems to be directed in a more general way. Apparently this was not merely an isolated incident, and others were engaged in sexual promiscuities of their own. What does Paul say regarding the value of the human body of a Christian?

Answer: as a temple it belongs to God

In the last verse of 1 Corinthians 6, Paul has this to say to the believers in Corinth: "For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God's."

The purchaser? Christ, as far as Christians are concerned.
The price? His blood sacrifice for mankind.
The benefit? Eternal life.
12. There was a faction among the inhabitants of Corinth that actually discouraged people from getting married, claiming that it was a sin to do so. How did Paul address this issue, in 1 Corinthians 7:28?

Answer: He plainly stated that there was no sin in getting married

The 28th verse begins this way: "But and if thou marry, thou hast not sinned..."

Paul had to repeatedly address some of the teachings that ran contrary to what he felt was revealed to him by God, not the least of which concerned those of human-to-human relationships of all sorts. He constantly had to reiterate his beliefs that God was not pleased with those who treated their fellow man in a shabby fashion, because Paul felt that to do so was in essence treating God in the same manner.

Not being married and having an intimate relationship with a person was considered by Paul to be much more damaging than to have a marital relationship with someone, and marriage was much more preferable from his point of view. As he stated in the aforementioned verse: "...if thou marry, thou hast NOT sinned..."
13. A common practice of the city of Corinth and surrounding regions was the eating of foodstuffs that had been offered to idol gods previously. I suppose that since the idols couldn't eat it (after all, they weren't exactly alive), the rationale must have been something like this, "There is no need in allowing perfectly good food to go to waste." Some people in the church took issue with other members of the congregation who engaged in such behavior. What feelings does Paul express about it, in chapter 8 of 1 Corinthians?

Answer: it's not a big deal, unless you know it to have been offered to idols first, and unless someone else is hurt by the action

Paul's rationale went something like this: Since an idol is a non-living entity, it really doesn't matter if a person UNKNOWINGLY eats something that had first been offered as a "sacrifice" to an idol god. In verse 4 he states, "...we know that an idol is nothing..." He goes further to advise those who don't have a problem with doing so, however, that they should not be offensive to others who might be weaker in the faith than them; tempting them, so to speak. If a person KNEW that the food had been offered to idols first, though, that became a completely different matter, and he advised against such. In verses 8 and 9, he makes this point rather clearly. "But meat commendeth us not to God: for neither, if we eat, are we the better: neither if we eat not, are we the worse. But take heed lest by any means this liberty of yours become a stumblingblock to them that are weak."
He takes this concept a step further in verse 12. "But when ye sin so against the brethren, and wound their weak conscience, ye sin against Christ."

I believe this to mean that Paul was saying in essence; 'Don't worry about what you eat, if you can do so with a clear conscience, BUT if it causes your fellow believers to have a problem, then by all means, refrain from being offensive to them.'
14. In the 9th chapter of 1 Corinthians, Paul states the obvious: that he is a Jew. What else does he say about himself, in verses 19-22?

Answer: that he is a representative of gentiles and that he is weak

In the beginning of chapter 9, we see that Paul is justifying his role as a minister of the gospel, yet in the latter portion of the chapter, he illustrates the limitations of his office. In verse 19 he states that he is a free-born man, but has become a willing servant to others.

In verse 20 he states that he is attempting to reach his fellow Jews with the gospel of Christ, and in verse 21, he points out that the gentiles (those without the law of God) are also a part of his ministry. He concludes this train of thought in verse 22 by saying that he is made weak, so that the weak can relate to him as well.

He says that he is representative of all things to all men, if he can reach at least some of them with the good news of Christ's ultimate sacrifice for mankind.
15. One of my personal favorite verses in the entire Bible is found in 1 Corinthians chapter 10. It speaks of temptations and Paul enumerates a listing of those that faced the children of Israel as they escaped the bondage of Egypt, centuries before his birth. In verse 13, what particularly does he have to say about such temptations?

Answer: everyone is tempted in much the same manner, but God provides an "escape route"

I am going to put the entire verse into capital letters, not something I usually do, but I LOVE this verse because it describes EVERYONE! Please read this excerpt from the King James Version carefully.

"THERE HATH NO TEMPTATION TAKEN YOU BUT SUCH AS IS COMMON TO MAN: BUT GOD IS FAITHFUL, WHO WILL NOT SUFFER YOU TO BE TEMPTED ABOVE THAT YE ARE ABLE: BUT WILL WITH THE TEMPTATION ALSO MAKE A WAY TO ESCAPE, THAT YE MAY BE ABLE TO BEAR IT."

We must look for the escape route; it IS provided, but we have to find it. We do NOT find it by looking at the thing that is tempting us, but rather by looking AWAY from it and focusing our attention on God and His will.

(Granted, that is MUCH easier said than done! I believe that it is possible, though, or it wouldn't be so plainly stated by Paul.)
16. Well, it seems that Paul was not through with addressing issues of food and drink. What did he have to say about things sacrificed to idols, in chapter 10, verses 14-21?

Answer: do not have fellowship with devils; eat as you please, but not with knowledge of things that have been sacrificed to idols

That, admittedly, was a TOUGHIE! Portions of each possible answer were true; but the only one that was totally accurate was the one that stated, "Do not have fellowship with devils; eat as you please, but not with knowledge of things that have been sacrificed to idols."

Please allow me to explain.

I will reprint a few of the verses, or at least portions of them to clarify matters.

vs. 14 "flee from idolatry"
vs. 16 "the cup...the blood of Christ"
vs. 16 "the bread...the body of Christ"
vs. 19 "...that which is offered in sacrifice to idols is anything?"
vs. 20 "the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and I would not that
ye should have fellowship with devils."
vs. 21 "Ye cannot drink the cup of the Lord, and the cup of devils..."
vss.25 & 26
"Whatsoever is sold in the shambles (meat markets) that eat,
asking no question for conscience sake: For the earth is the Lord's
and the fulness thereof."

vs. 31 "Whether therefore ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the
glory of God."

In other words, Paul was telling them not to voluntarily or wittingly partake of things that they KNEW were evil, but at the same time, not to inquire too deeply into such things, so that they would have a clear conscience.

He concludes this object lesson by telling them in verse 32, "Give none offence, neither to the Jews, nor to the Gentiles, nor to the church of God."
17. Paul addressed the issue of abuse of the Lord's supper in chapter 11 of 1st Corinthians. In what ways were some of the people involved failing to honor God with their actions?

Answer: they were getting drunk and allowing people to go hungry while others stuffed themselves

Beginning in verse 17 of the 11th chapter, Paul roundly scolds the people of the church at Corinth for their lack of respect for God and their fellow man.
He tells them that they are of divided opinions and operate in a heretical fashion in the way that they "observe" the Lord's supper. Gluttony and drunkenness are the two primary ways that they are in violation of the respect owed to each other and to God. He then proceeds to remind them of the observation of the Passover meal that Christ shared with His disciples, often called "The Last Supper."

He points out that the somber event has been made a mockery by them as they just do as they please, without regard to the origins of the observation of the meal.

In verses 29 and 30, he tells them what the results of such flippant behavior can cost them.

"For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord's body. For this cause many are weak and sickly among you, and many sleep." Sleep in this context means "die." It is important to note that Paul does not say that they eat or drink damnation to their souls; only to their bodies.
18. Paul covers the topic of the "body" of Christ in chapter 12 of 1st Corinthians. What does he say about the body of believers that allegorically represents the body of Christ, in verse 12-14?

Answer: the body is one entity with many members

Verses 12-14 read as follows:
"For as the body is one, and hath many members, and all the members of that one body, being many, are one body: so also is Christ. For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body, whether we be Jews or Gentiles, whether we be bond or free; and have been all made to drink into one Spirit. For the body is not one member, but many."
19. The 13th chapter of 1st Corinthians is often referred to as "The Love Chapter." Love is called "charity" in the King James Version, but the meaning is clearly the same. Which of the following aspects or facets of love is NOT mentioned in this chapter?

Answer: love is self-centered

There is absolutely no basis for love to be represented as a selfish emotion. Paul gives a very clear and concise definition of all the things that true love is, and of what it isn't. He concludes the chapter in much the same way as he introduces it: by stating that genuine love (or charity) is the greatest of all things, better even than faith or hope.
20. Most everyone who has read at least some portion of the Bible, and may have studied a little bit about Christ's ministry on Earth, has been told that He was resurrected on the third day. Many people believe that He appeared to His disciples, Mary Magdalene, and others after His resurrection. Paul also claims to have seen Him, much later on the road to Damascus. In 1 Corinthians 15:4-6, though, Paul states a specific number of people who saw the resurrected Christ besides all these folks. How many people did he say that Christ once appeared to, all at the same time?

Answer: over 500

Beginning in verse 4 and reading through verse 8, Paul had this to say about the resurrected Jesus:
"And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures: And that he was seen of Cephas (Peter), then of the twelve (disciples): After that, he was seen of above FIVE HUNDRED brethren at once; of whom the greater part remain (are still alive) until this present, but some are fallen asleep (dead). After that, he was seen of James; then of all the apostles. And last of all he was seen of me also, as one born out of due time."
Source: Author logcrawler

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