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Quiz about Pauls Love Chapter I Corinthians 13 Three Ways
Quiz about Pauls Love Chapter I Corinthians 13 Three Ways

Paul's Love Chapter (I Corinthians 13): Three Ways Quiz


This quiz explores I Corinthians 13 in three translations: King James, NIV, and The Message. This is one of my favorite chapters in the whole Bible. I hope that you enjoy this quiz.

A multiple-choice quiz by SterlingT. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
SterlingT
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
356,501
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
355
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Question 1 of 10
1. Modern translation uniformly translate the Greek word "agape" as "love." In the King James Version, how is agape translated? (Hint: Faith, hope, and _____.) Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. A highly evocative phrase in the King James Version is in verse 12, "For now we see through a glass, darkly." How is this phrase translated in the NIV? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. In 1 Corinthians 13:1, the NIV says that if I speak and do not have love, "I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal." This is very close to "sounding brass or tinkling cymbal" in the KJV. Eugene Peterson uses a different image in The Message. To what does The Message compare speaking without love? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In verse 11, The Message reads, "When I grew up, I left those infant ways for good." This is a famous quote in the King James Version. How does it read? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In the second half of verse 12, the King James Version reads, "But then shall I know even as also I am known." The period English strikes me as somewhat confusing. How does this passage read in the NIV? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Verses 4 through 9 describe what love is. Verse 7 is a particularly beautiful verse in the King James Version. In the NIV, it reads, "It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres." What is the King James translation? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Peterson's colorful prose in The Message reads well in the opening clause of I Corinthians 13:1. The NIV and the KJV are almost identical, "Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels" (KJV) and "If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels" (NIV). What is this phrase in The Message? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Verse 5 contains further descriptions of love. The first half of the verse in the King James Version reads, "Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own." How is this translated in the NIV? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. The second half of verse 5 in the King James Version reads, "is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil." What is the NIV translation? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Peterson outdoes himself in verse 13. Where the other translations just note that these three "abide" (KJV) or "remain" (NIV), The Message advises us how to apply them. It reads in part, "Trust steadily in God, hope unswervingly." How does it instruct us to love? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Modern translation uniformly translate the Greek word "agape" as "love." In the King James Version, how is agape translated? (Hint: Faith, hope, and _____.)

Answer: Charity

The word "agape" is one of several Greek words that may be translated into English as "love." It is used especially for the love of God, both God's love for His people and believers' love for God. Other Greek words for love include "philia" (brotherly love) and "eros" (romantic love).
2. A highly evocative phrase in the King James Version is in verse 12, "For now we see through a glass, darkly." How is this phrase translated in the NIV?

Answer: "For now we see only a reflection as in a mirror"

In my opinion, this phrase illustrates both one of the strengths and one of the problems of using the King James Version. The phrase "Through a glass darkly" is memorable and poetic. However, few modern readers are likely to immediately recognize "glass" as meaning a mirror, as in "looking glass." The Holy Bible can be difficult enough to understand in modern translations. It is my view that we don't always need the additional problems of Elizabethan English, no matter how beautiful!

Incidentally, Ingmar Bergman's film "Through a Glass Darkly" is a memorable title. However, the original Swedish simply translates "As in a Mirror."
3. In 1 Corinthians 13:1, the NIV says that if I speak and do not have love, "I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal." This is very close to "sounding brass or tinkling cymbal" in the KJV. Eugene Peterson uses a different image in The Message. To what does The Message compare speaking without love?

Answer: "The creaking of a rusty gate"

I like The Message very much. It is so contemporary that it feels like a paraphrase, although technically it is not. Peterson translated from the original languages. He often illuminates difficult passages for me. Still, it is such a free translation that I would not recommend it as one's only Bible.
4. In verse 11, The Message reads, "When I grew up, I left those infant ways for good." This is a famous quote in the King James Version. How does it read?

Answer: "But when I became a man, I put away childish things."

The King James Version of the Holy Bible is easily the greatest work of literature in English produced by a committee. It often rivals the greatest of all writers in English, William Shakespeare. Having used the word "famous" in the question, I could not resist throwing in a bit of Polonius' speech to Laertes from "Hamlet" -- that's the part about "To thine own self be true."
5. In the second half of verse 12, the King James Version reads, "But then shall I know even as also I am known." The period English strikes me as somewhat confusing. How does this passage read in the NIV?

Answer: "Then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known."

This is a passage where I prefer the unadorned, dignified modern English of the NIV. The Message reads, "knowing him directly just as he knows us."
6. Verses 4 through 9 describe what love is. Verse 7 is a particularly beautiful verse in the King James Version. In the NIV, it reads, "It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres." What is the King James translation?

Answer: "Beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things."

In my opinion the NIV is pretty good, but can't hold a candle to the King James Version's sonorous cadences. There is a difference between "always trusts" and "trusts in everything."
7. Peterson's colorful prose in The Message reads well in the opening clause of I Corinthians 13:1. The NIV and the KJV are almost identical, "Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels" (KJV) and "If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels" (NIV). What is this phrase in The Message?

Answer: "If I speak with human eloquence and angelic ecstasy"

In this instance, one might accuse Peterson of over-elaboration, but I personally like the juxtaposition of "eloquence" and "ecstasy." (I thought it time for a little more Shakespeare. The "muse of fire" is from the Prologue to "Henry V.")
8. Verse 5 contains further descriptions of love. The first half of the verse in the King James Version reads, "Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own." How is this translated in the NIV?

Answer: "It is not rude, it is not self-seeking."

Both the KJV and the NIV have the advantage on The Message here, in my opinion. "Isn't always 'me-first'" is not one of Peterson's more graceful phrases.
9. The second half of verse 5 in the King James Version reads, "is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil." What is the NIV translation?

Answer: "It is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs."

I give The Message a split decision on this one. "Doesn't fly off the handle" seems unnecessarily colloquial to me, but "Doesn't keep score of the sins of others" is more specific and vivid than either of the other translations.

I'm not crazy about "Thinketh no evil." I can't help feeling that it's the lost fourth monkey of the "See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil" grouping.
10. Peterson outdoes himself in verse 13. Where the other translations just note that these three "abide" (KJV) or "remain" (NIV), The Message advises us how to apply them. It reads in part, "Trust steadily in God, hope unswervingly." How does it instruct us to love?

Answer: "Love extravagantly"

"Love extravagantly!" What a magnificent directive!

Here's all of verse 13, according to The Message: "But for right now, until that completeness, we have three things to do to lead us toward that consummation: Trust steadily in God, hope unswervingly, love extravagantly. And the best of the three is love."
Source: Author SterlingT

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor CellarDoor before going online.
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