FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about McSurfies Medical Misadventures
Quiz about McSurfies Medical Misadventures

McSurfie's Medical Misadventures Quiz


Welcome to the latest quiz, going towards my Adventures in Authoring badge. This time it's a medical quiz about various ailments and injuries I have sustained in my life. I hope you enjoy playing this quiz, and learn a bit about the human body.

A multiple-choice quiz by mcsurfie. Estimated time: 4 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Science Trivia
  6. »
  7. Miscellaneous Health
  8. »
  9. Mixed Health Questions

Author
mcsurfie
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
365,928
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
702
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. My first medical mishap occurred when I was a child. Whilst playing with my cousin, I fell down a set of stairs, hitting my head. Some time afterwards I was diagnosed with epilepsy. What is the name of one of the tests which epileptics undergo while they have the condition? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Another mishap I had as a child was displacing my right elbow joint, suffering a greenstick fracture. What best describes a greenstick fracture? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. As a child you can guess I was pretty accident prone. A few years after injuring my arm I injured my knee. As a result, I was diagnosed with Still's disease. What is this condition better known as now? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Whilst playing with a school friend, they threw their grandfather's rusty old helmet at me, resulting in my requiring me to have butterfly stitches to the cut under my chin. What are butterfly stitches?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Another illness I have had since childhood is the occasional bout of anterior uveitis. What part of the body does anterior uveitis affect? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. This next illness I suffered is highly infectious but can be prevented by vaccination. What common name is given to the condition known as either morbilli or rubeola? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Another illness I suffered from as an adult is infectious mononucleosis, caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. What is this condition better known as? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Recently I was diagnosed with having high cholesterol levels. What is the name of the controversial drugs used to help combat high levels of cholesterol? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. When the weather gets cold, I occasionally suffer from cold sores. What is the common medical name for this condition? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. My latest mishap was carpal tunnel syndrome. What part of the body does carpal tunnel syndrome affect? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Jun 21 2024 : marianjoy: 8/10
Jun 03 2024 : Guest 173: 6/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. My first medical mishap occurred when I was a child. Whilst playing with my cousin, I fell down a set of stairs, hitting my head. Some time afterwards I was diagnosed with epilepsy. What is the name of one of the tests which epileptics undergo while they have the condition?

Answer: Electroencephalography (EEG)

Electroencephalography (EEG) involves placing a number of electrodes on the scalp of the patient to record fluctuations in neuron activity. To stimulate brain activity various coloured, flashing lights are shown to the patient.

Electroencephalography can also be used when diagnosing sleep disorders, and to determine brain death in the event of a person being in a coma. In addition, X-ray computed tomography (CT Scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to monitor brain activity in those diagnosed with epilepsy.

When most people think of epilepsy, they picture that person collapsing to the ground, shaking and possibly foaming at the mouth, but this is not the case in everyone suffering from epilepsy as there are several different types of seizure.
2. Another mishap I had as a child was displacing my right elbow joint, suffering a greenstick fracture. What best describes a greenstick fracture?

Answer: A partial fracture of the bone

A greenstick fracture commonly occurs amongst children, where their bones have not properly formed and are still soft. The term itself derives from the type of break that usually occurs in fresh wood which breaks on the outside when bent.The condition was discovered by two orthopedists, John Insall and Michael Slupeki.

Greenstick fractures usually occur when there is an extreme bending force in the area of the fractures, causing a partial break in the bones. Treatment can involve either removable splints, or in some cases, a cast over the damaged area. Once the fracture has healed, there can be a bend in the bone. In the case of my elbow, my lower right arm is slightly bent out when I hold my arms out straight.
3. As a child you can guess I was pretty accident prone. A few years after injuring my arm I injured my knee. As a result, I was diagnosed with Still's disease. What is this condition better known as now?

Answer: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

The medical term juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is used to describe a form of rheumatoid arthritis that occurs in those under the age of 16. The idiopathic part of JIA refers to the fact there is no defined cause for this condition. Other terms for this condition are juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile chronic arthritis.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis can vary from child to child, with some only suffering limited movement in the affected area, to a more chronic, long lasting condition. The disease itself is an autoimmune disease where the body's own immune system attacks cells - especially in the joints, causing inflammation and pain. Treatment can involve a combination of physiotherapy, pain management, medication and, in some cases, surgery.
4. Whilst playing with a school friend, they threw their grandfather's rusty old helmet at me, resulting in my requiring me to have butterfly stitches to the cut under my chin. What are butterfly stitches?

Answer: Thin strips of sticking plaster

Butterfly stitches are thin strips of sticking plasters, applied over a wound to pull the skin together, and can be also used in conjunction with stitches that doctors or surgeons use when closing a wound.

Butterfly stitches can also be found in first aid kits, as they do not need a doctor or nurse to apply them to a wound.
5. Another illness I have had since childhood is the occasional bout of anterior uveitis. What part of the body does anterior uveitis affect?

Answer: The eyes

Anterior uveitis (or iritis as it is sometimes known) affects the iris of the eye. Symptoms include inflammation of the iris and anterior chamber resulting in blurred vision, sensitivity to bright light, redness of the eye, and pain in the eye. Treatment of this condition can involve use of glucocorticoid steroids, atropine or homatropine.

The condition can reoccur if the eyes are placed under too much strain, perhaps by exposure to bright light, or by such activities as spending prolonged periods of time staring at a computer monitor.
6. This next illness I suffered is highly infectious but can be prevented by vaccination. What common name is given to the condition known as either morbilli or rubeola?

Answer: English measles

Not to be confused with German measles, English measles does share some similarity in its symptoms in that it is an airborne disease that is spread by airborne fluid from either the mouth or nose. Symptoms include a rash, flu like symptoms and red eyes. English measles is highly contagious, but can be prevented by inoculation with a combined Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine.

Measles is caused by a virus of the Morbillivirus genus, part of the Paramyxoviridae family of viruses. Although treatable, measles can lead to further complications such as pneumonia, bronchitis and encephalitis.
7. Another illness I suffered from as an adult is infectious mononucleosis, caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. What is this condition better known as?

Answer: Glandular fever

Infectious mononucleosis is known more commonly as glandular fever or mono. It affects the lymph nodes found in the neck, causing them to become inflamed.

Symptoms include a sore throat, fever, fatigue and headaches. The disease can be transmitted orally, which also gives glandular fever the nickname of "the kissing disease", and is caused by the Epstein-Barr Virus. Treatment can involve a combination of pain-killers, anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-viral medication along with a period of rest during the most acute phase of the infection.
8. Recently I was diagnosed with having high cholesterol levels. What is the name of the controversial drugs used to help combat high levels of cholesterol?

Answer: Statins

Statins are a class of drugs used to lower cholesterol levels, inhibiting the HMG-CoA reductase enzyme that is produced in the liver. Due to the nature of the side effects of the drug, their benefits have been questioned in helping to prevent cardio vascular disease, especially in those with no history of CVD.

In addition, statins can have side effects such as muscle wastage, cramps, increased risk of diabetes and nerve damage.
9. When the weather gets cold, I occasionally suffer from cold sores. What is the common medical name for this condition?

Answer: Herpes labialis

Herpes labialis is a type of herpes simplex virus is caused by either the HVS1 or HVS2 virus affecting the lips of a person. This infection presents itself in the form of blisters, lasting from a few days to a few weeks. It is often caused when the skin and lips become damaged and infected. Other causes include stress, menstruation and dehydration. Treatment can involve use of either antiviral creams, anaesthetic creams or zinc oxide/zinc sulphate.
10. My latest mishap was carpal tunnel syndrome. What part of the body does carpal tunnel syndrome affect?

Answer: The hands

Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when the median nerve becomes compressed as it runs from the wrist into the hand. Symptoms can range from mild discomfort, to lack or grip, numbness and short term paralysis. If not treated, long term nerve damage may occur.

The operation involves an incision from the wrist into the base of the hand, cutting open the transverse carpal ligament and releasing pressure on the nerve. This operation can be done under local anaesthesia, by either a surgeon or a doctor trained in the procedure. Other treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome can involve splints, steroid injections and physiotherapy to alleviate the condition.
Source: Author mcsurfie

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor rossian before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
7/20/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us