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Quiz about JustCouldntReach It
Quiz about JustCouldntReach It

Just...Couldn't....Reach It Trivia Quiz


Not being about reaching the check with alligator arms, this match is about baseballers who fell just short of a lifetime accomplishment. Hopefully educational if you want it and strike the match!

A matching quiz by dg_dave. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
dg_dave
Time
5 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
385,034
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
218
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. This Hall of Fame player fell just three RBIs short of becoming the first in history to reach 2300.  
  Rickey Henderson
2. If I could just have scored five more times in my career, I would have been the first in history to score 2300 times.  
  Derek Jeter
3. If this pitcher had just 125 more strikeouts over his 22 seasons, he would have been the second in history to reach 5000.  
  Randy Johnson
4. This manager fell just one league pennant short of being only the third manager in history to win 10.  
  Connie Mack
5. With just 10 more career shutouts I could have added the 100-shutout milestone to my three Triple Crowns.  
  Joe Torre
6. Not that I wanted it but if my bat had just one more World Series strikeout I would have been the second slugger in history to reach a career 40.  
  Robin Roberts
7. If I had managed for just one more season, I would have been the fourth manager in history to reach 30 seasons of managing.  
  Nolan Ryan
8. With only eight more career losses, I would have been only the third player in history to lose 300 games.  
  Hank Aaron
9. With playing for 19 seasons overall, if I had just 62 more stolen bases then I would have been the first in history to steal 1000.  
  Pete Alexander
10. If I had just given up four more home runs in a certain season then I would have been the first pitcher in history to give up 50.  
  Lou Brock





Select each answer

1. This Hall of Fame player fell just three RBIs short of becoming the first in history to reach 2300.
2. If I could just have scored five more times in my career, I would have been the first in history to score 2300 times.
3. If this pitcher had just 125 more strikeouts over his 22 seasons, he would have been the second in history to reach 5000.
4. This manager fell just one league pennant short of being only the third manager in history to win 10.
5. With just 10 more career shutouts I could have added the 100-shutout milestone to my three Triple Crowns.
6. Not that I wanted it but if my bat had just one more World Series strikeout I would have been the second slugger in history to reach a career 40.
7. If I had managed for just one more season, I would have been the fourth manager in history to reach 30 seasons of managing.
8. With only eight more career losses, I would have been only the third player in history to lose 300 games.
9. With playing for 19 seasons overall, if I had just 62 more stolen bases then I would have been the first in history to steal 1000.
10. If I had just given up four more home runs in a certain season then I would have been the first pitcher in history to give up 50.

Most Recent Scores
Mar 29 2024 : Guest 12: 8/10
Feb 17 2024 : Guest 169: 10/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This Hall of Fame player fell just three RBIs short of becoming the first in history to reach 2300.

Answer: Hank Aaron

Aaron played 21 of his 23 seasons with the Braves. He retired in 1976 after two seasons with the Brewers. When Aaron retired, he bumped the great Babe Ruth off the top spot to number two. Of course, Aaron was known for breaking Babe Ruth's career home run record when he hit number 715, then retired with 755.
2. If I could just have scored five more times in my career, I would have been the first in history to score 2300 times.

Answer: Rickey Henderson

Rickey played in 25 seasons and retired with 2295 runs scored. He led the league in runs scored five times. Playing for nine teams in his 25 seasons, it wasn't that nobody really wanted him, they did for his legs. Rickey was most noted for being the first player to steal over 1000 bases.

He retired with 1406. Henderson also set a season record in 1982 by stealing 130. The Hall inducted him in 2009.
3. If this pitcher had just 125 more strikeouts over his 22 seasons, he would have been the second in history to reach 5000.

Answer: Randy Johnson

Johnson pitched from 1988-2009. Randy played for six teams but spent 18 seasons between the Mariners and Diamondbacks. He led the league an amazing nine times with the most strikeouts. He won four consecutive Cy Young Awards along with a separate fifth, and was runner-up another three times. Johnson walked away with 4875 career strikeouts just short of joining the great Nolan Ryan in the 5000 Strikeout Club.
4. This manager fell just one league pennant short of being only the third manager in history to win 10.

Answer: Connie Mack

While John McGraw won 10 league pennants in 33 seasons, Casey Stengel won 10 pennants in 25 seasons. They were the only ones to reach 10. Mack spent 53 seasons of managing and could only muster nine league pennants. Connie managed Pittsburgh for three seasons from 1894-1896, then the Athletics in the American League for 50 seasons.

He retired in 1950 and was already a member of the Hall of Fame in 1937. Manager Joe McCarthy also won nine league pennants.
5. With just 10 more career shutouts I could have added the 100-shutout milestone to my three Triple Crowns.

Answer: Pete Alexander

Grover Cleveland 'Pete' Alexander pitched in 20 seasons with the Phillies, Cubs, and Cardinals. Two of his Triple Crowns came with the Phillies in 1915 and 1916, then in 1920 with the Cubs. He led the league seven times with the most shutouts while topping out at 16 in 1916. Pete would have become only the second player in history to reach 100 shutouts behind the great Walter Johnson's 110. Alexander was a 1938 Hall inductee.
6. Not that I wanted it but if my bat had just one more World Series strikeout I would have been the second slugger in history to reach a career 40.

Answer: Derek Jeter

Yankee Mickey Mantle set a career World Series record by striking out 54 times in 12 World Series. Jeter who appeared in seven World Series with the Yankees struck out 39 times. In the regular season, Mantle averaged 115 strikeouts per season in his 18 seasons. Jeter averaged 109 strikeouts in his 20 seasons.

In the 2016 World Series, the Cubs' Javier Baez tied a single World Series record by striking out 13 times at the arms of the Indians. He tied the record of the Phillies Ryan Howard who struck out 13 times in 2009 against the Yankees.
7. If I had managed for just one more season, I would have been the fourth manager in history to reach 30 seasons of managing.

Answer: Joe Torre

The same goes for managers Bobby Cox and Bucky Harris. Torre as player made his name as a catcher with the Braves in the 1960s. After retiring as a player/manager with the Mets in 1977, he was a solo manager with the team until 1981. From 1982-1984 he took control over the Braves for three seasons. From there he was on to St. Louis to helm the Cardinals in six seasons. Joe then wore the pinstripes where he won four World Series with an additional two AL pennants where he won two Manager of the Year Awards in 1996 and 1998. Torre retired after three seasons with the Dodgers in 2010.

He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014. The other three managers to have 30+ seasons under their belt are Connie Mack, John McGraw, and Tony LaRussa.
8. With only eight more career losses, I would have been only the third player in history to lose 300 games.

Answer: Nolan Ryan

The Hall of Fame great Ryan pitched in 27 seasons with a career 324-292 record. Nolan pitched for four teams throughout his career and retired with a tremendous record of 5714 strikeouts. Pud Galvin was the first to lose 300 over his 15 seasons with a 365-310 record retiring in 1892.

The great Cy Young was the second to lose 300 after his 22 seasons when he retired in 1911 with a 511-316 record.
9. With playing for 19 seasons overall, if I had just 62 more stolen bases then I would have been the first in history to steal 1000.

Answer: Lou Brock

Brock played from 1961-1979 first with the Cubs and then the Cardinals. Brock led the league in stolen bases eight times and in 1974 broke Dodger Maury Wills' record of 104 with 118 of his own. Lou retired with 938 career bases and was on top of the heap when he retired.

When he retired in 1979 there was a 20-year old rookie by the name of Rickey Henderson who went on to break Brock's season and career records. Brock was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.
10. If I had just given up four more home runs in a certain season then I would have been the first pitcher in history to give up 50.

Answer: Robin Roberts

Although Robin who pitched mostly with the Phillies retired in 1966 after 19 seasons. He was the NL MVP runner-up in 1952. The Hall of Famer doesn't care much for his home run records but gave up 46 in 1956. That mark was a Major League season record until Minnesota Twin Bert Blyleven gave up 50 in the 1986 season to the relief of Robin. Roberts gave up a career 505 home runs which was a record until Jamie Moyer came along and gave up a career 522 when he retired in 2002.
Source: Author dg_dave

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor gtho4 before going online.
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