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Quiz about Razzle Dazzle
Quiz about Razzle Dazzle

Razzle Dazzle Trivia Quiz


Razzle dazzle is defined as a showy activity designed to attract attention. In sports, deceptive plays designed to fool opponents are called razzle dazzle. Here are ten questions from American sports where razzle dazzle was used to trick opponents.

A multiple-choice quiz by Spaudrey. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
Spaudrey
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
373,987
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
2072
Last 3 plays: GlennaRuth (4/10), kyleisalive (5/10), BigTriviaDawg (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Football is the top sport that lends to razzle-dazzle being used, as the teams' offenses set up plays directly against the opponents' defense. This first play involved the Nebraska Cornhuskers and the Miami Hurricanes college football teams in the 1984 Orange Bowl. Nebraska's quarterback left the hike on the ground after which an offensive lineman picked the ball up, ran the opposite direction the play appeared to go and managed to score a touchdown. Nebraska had a name for the play...what did they call it? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. What is often looked upon as the greatest play in college football history occurred November 20, 1982. The play nowadays is simply called that..."The Play" and involved multiple moments of "razzle dazzle". After gaining the lead with four seconds left in the game, Stanford University kicked off, and their opponents managed five laterals to avoid being tackled and got into the end zone for the game winning score, also avoiding running into the marching band who had run onto the field thinking the game was over. What college scored this unlikely touchdown? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. A play on September 2, 2010 involving some "razzle dazzle" had Presbyterian College throw a backward screen pass to a receiver after which the receiver threw down field to another receiver for a touchdown. While an uncommon play, it isn't necessarily rare enough to warrant a quiz question. What happened in the play that made it unique? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In a playoff game in 1982 against the San Diego Chargers, the Miami Dolphins executed a play they called "87 Circle Curl Lateral" to end the first half. Quarterback Don Strock threw twenty yards to receiver Duriel Harris, who immediately chucked a lateral to a full-speed Tony Nathan who ran the last 25 yards for the touchdown. The origins of the term to describe this play are unknown, but it has garnered a standard name. What is this type of play now called? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In a football game between the NFL Oakland Raiders and the San Diego Chargers in 1978, Raiders quarterback Ken "The Snake" Stabler fumbled the ball on the last play of the game. Two different Raider players got their hands on the ball, both being sure to move the ball forward toward the goal line. In the end, Dave Casper recovered the ball in the end zone for the win. This play has been given a name, what is it called? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. This display of "razzle dazzle" is huge in terms of importance in National Football League history. A playoff game was decided between the Tennessee Titans and the Buffalo Bills near the end of the 4th quarter. Down one with :16 left, the Titans' Lorenzo Neal received the kickoff, handed off to Frank Wycheck who ran to the right side of the field, drawing all the defenders to that side. He then threw a lateral across the field to Kevin Dyson who ran 75 yards for the game winning score. What has this play come to be known as? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. In one of the most brazen displays of "razzle dazzle" in college football history, Boise State would bring two remarkable plays in the same game. The first was a fourth down play which would force overtime. In overtime, instead of kicking an extra point to continue the game, Boise State went for two in an all or nothing bid to end the game. They got the win by perfectly executing a play that has been named after a famous landmark in the USA. What was the play called? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. The term "razzle dazzle" doesn't get used much in basketball, as the level of scoring opportunities is considerably higher, so not much trickery is seen. That said, a player on a fast break may add some "razzle dazzle" to his shot to pump the fans up a little more. This consists of jumping high enough to forcefully send the ball through the hoop downward, better known as a 'slam dunk'. Three of these are synonyms for 'slam dunk', which of these is NOT? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Baseball doesn't lend itself to trickery and "razzle dazzle" much either. But there is one incident, while rare, that could qualify successfully for this theme. The play consists of a man on base being tagged out from a fake throw to the base he is standing on. All fielders have to be in on it, as they have to act like the ball was overthrown and is loose on the field. If the trick works, the runner will attempt to run to the next base, at which point the pitcher, still holding the ball, will easily throw the runner out. This play has garnered a name as well, named after a Midwestern city. The play is called the _____ Pickoff. Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Hockey doesn't lend itself to "razzle dazzle". But a University of Michigan hockey player pulled off a "razzle dazzle" goal that got his name forever associated with the method. From behind the goal and motionless, this player scooped the puck up with his stick and finessed the puck lacrosse-style into the upper corner of the net all while maintaining his position behind it. Sometimes called the "Michigan", it is more commonly called what? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Football is the top sport that lends to razzle-dazzle being used, as the teams' offenses set up plays directly against the opponents' defense. This first play involved the Nebraska Cornhuskers and the Miami Hurricanes college football teams in the 1984 Orange Bowl. Nebraska's quarterback left the hike on the ground after which an offensive lineman picked the ball up, ran the opposite direction the play appeared to go and managed to score a touchdown. Nebraska had a name for the play...what did they call it?

Answer: Fumblerooski

The play as it was run in 1984 is now illegal, as it has now been ruled that an intentional fumble must be dropped behind the holder. Therefore a ball dropped immediately from the hike without turning may not be advanced except by the quarterback.
2. What is often looked upon as the greatest play in college football history occurred November 20, 1982. The play nowadays is simply called that..."The Play" and involved multiple moments of "razzle dazzle". After gaining the lead with four seconds left in the game, Stanford University kicked off, and their opponents managed five laterals to avoid being tackled and got into the end zone for the game winning score, also avoiding running into the marching band who had run onto the field thinking the game was over. What college scored this unlikely touchdown?

Answer: University of California

Kevin Moen caught the final blind lateral and dodged multiple band members the final 25 yards. John Elway, future NFL Hall of Famer, was the quarterback for Stanford. "The Play" has been scrutinized for years to decipher its legality, as some of the laterals were on the borderline of being forward passes, rendering the play illegal.

But Stanford had multiple penalties already called on them for too many players on the field, as well as the aforementioned band. The result had major consequences for Stanford, who were likely to play in the Hall of Fame Classic had they won. All in all, Stanford still holds a grudge regarding the result, going as far as to change the traveling plaque to read what the score was prior to the game winning touchdown. Cal simply changes it back when they win the plaque back.
3. A play on September 2, 2010 involving some "razzle dazzle" had Presbyterian College throw a backward screen pass to a receiver after which the receiver threw down field to another receiver for a touchdown. While an uncommon play, it isn't necessarily rare enough to warrant a quiz question. What happened in the play that made it unique?

Answer: The quarterback purposely bounced his screen pass.

Presbyterian was playing Wake Forest at the time. The quarterback threw a bounce pass to his receiver who was behind him on the field, meaning the ball was still live. But with three defenders within five yards of him, the receiver slowly walked back and put his hand up as to indicate the play was over due to the "incomplete pass". And all three Wake Forest players stopped! After a beat, the receiver threw the ball to a wide open end downfield and he scrambled in for the touchdown. Jim Grobe, Wake Forest coach, said it was "as well executed as anything I've ever seen." But he could afford the compliment; Wake Forest still won 53-13.
4. In a playoff game in 1982 against the San Diego Chargers, the Miami Dolphins executed a play they called "87 Circle Curl Lateral" to end the first half. Quarterback Don Strock threw twenty yards to receiver Duriel Harris, who immediately chucked a lateral to a full-speed Tony Nathan who ran the last 25 yards for the touchdown. The origins of the term to describe this play are unknown, but it has garnered a standard name. What is this type of play now called?

Answer: Hook and Ladder

It's aka "hook and lateral". Many disagree on how the play received the name it did. Some versions call for a receiver to run a "hook" pattern after which he throws a lateral; that creates a "hook and lateral", which when shortened becomes hook and ladder. Others deem it coming from the firefighter term for the hook ladder sequence that gets put together in pieces, therefore one piece (the pass) has to come before the next (the lateral). Regardless, the name has stuck, being used by many sportscasters and pundits.
Miami would end up losing the game in overtime.
5. In a football game between the NFL Oakland Raiders and the San Diego Chargers in 1978, Raiders quarterback Ken "The Snake" Stabler fumbled the ball on the last play of the game. Two different Raider players got their hands on the ball, both being sure to move the ball forward toward the goal line. In the end, Dave Casper recovered the ball in the end zone for the win. This play has been given a name, what is it called?

Answer: The Holy Roller

Stabler has since admitted the fumble was on purpose to avoid a game-ending sack. San Diego fans have a different name for the play..."The Immaculate Deception".

This "razzle dazzle" play led to rule changes at the end of the season. Now in the last two minutes of a half, or any time on fourth down, the person who fumbles the ball is the only one on offense who can pick it up to advance it. All others on his team who pick it up end the play and forward progress stops at the point of the fumble or behind if that is where it is recovered. Football has taken many cues from religion in naming their plays; included in football history; in addition to the Holy Roller, are Hail Mary plays and the Immaculate Reception.
6. This display of "razzle dazzle" is huge in terms of importance in National Football League history. A playoff game was decided between the Tennessee Titans and the Buffalo Bills near the end of the 4th quarter. Down one with :16 left, the Titans' Lorenzo Neal received the kickoff, handed off to Frank Wycheck who ran to the right side of the field, drawing all the defenders to that side. He then threw a lateral across the field to Kevin Dyson who ran 75 yards for the game winning score. What has this play come to be known as?

Answer: The Music City Miracle

In Titans' playbooks the play was called "Home Run Throwback". Dyson had rarely practiced the play prior to trying it in the game as the role was originally lined up for Derrick Mason to catch the lateral. But he had been injured in the game. What many people forget is this was NOT the last play, Tennessee had :03 left, so they had to kickoff one last time.

But Buffalo didn't have the same magic as Tennessee, and the game ended 22-16. Tennessee rode the momentum of this play all the way to the Super Bowl, but would end up one yard short of tying the game up, and lost to the St. Louis Rams.
7. In one of the most brazen displays of "razzle dazzle" in college football history, Boise State would bring two remarkable plays in the same game. The first was a fourth down play which would force overtime. In overtime, instead of kicking an extra point to continue the game, Boise State went for two in an all or nothing bid to end the game. They got the win by perfectly executing a play that has been named after a famous landmark in the USA. What was the play called?

Answer: The Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty play got its name from when a quarterback fades back as if to pass, at which point a running back grabs the ball from the quarterback's non-throwing hand and runs with it. In the Boise State version, quarterback Jared Zabransky had three receivers lined up right of him. He took the ball and faked a motion of throwing that direction, all the while cradling the ball against his body with his left hand (taking the pose of the Statue of Liberty). Running Back Ian Johnson grabbed the ball (not before hesitating to act as if he was watching the "pass"), and ran untouched with no blockers to the left corner of the end zone for the winning two-point conversion.

This capped an undefeated season for the Boise State Broncos and led to the criticism of the method of choosing a National Champion in Division I college football, as Boise State, who hadn't lost a game, was not ranked high enough to get to the championship game.
8. The term "razzle dazzle" doesn't get used much in basketball, as the level of scoring opportunities is considerably higher, so not much trickery is seen. That said, a player on a fast break may add some "razzle dazzle" to his shot to pump the fans up a little more. This consists of jumping high enough to forcefully send the ball through the hoop downward, better known as a 'slam dunk'. Three of these are synonyms for 'slam dunk', which of these is NOT?

Answer: Spike

Spike is more a term for the forceful hit on a volleyball. Spiking a basketball to score a basket could be done, but players generally gain some control of the ball while in the air before slam dunking the ball. This in basketball terms is called an 'Alley Oop'.
9. Baseball doesn't lend itself to trickery and "razzle dazzle" much either. But there is one incident, while rare, that could qualify successfully for this theme. The play consists of a man on base being tagged out from a fake throw to the base he is standing on. All fielders have to be in on it, as they have to act like the ball was overthrown and is loose on the field. If the trick works, the runner will attempt to run to the next base, at which point the pitcher, still holding the ball, will easily throw the runner out. This play has garnered a name as well, named after a Midwestern city. The play is called the _____ Pickoff.

Answer: Wichita

The play's name comes from the 1982 College World Series where the Miami Hurricanes and Wichita State were matched up. With a runner on first, the pitcher faked the throw, and the fielder dove to "catch" the ball. Then the members of the bullpen got up as if to get out of the way of the ball. Even Miami cheerleaders did the same. Runner Phil Stephenson dashed toward second, and was thrown out on the throw to shortstop.

The play was recreated in the movie "Little Big League", where Seattle Mariner speedster Ken Griffey Jr. was thrown out at second. In scouring for video of the original play, I don't find any. But video of it happening since are out there. Successful maneuvers of this play always go viral if filmed.
10. Hockey doesn't lend itself to "razzle dazzle". But a University of Michigan hockey player pulled off a "razzle dazzle" goal that got his name forever associated with the method. From behind the goal and motionless, this player scooped the puck up with his stick and finessed the puck lacrosse-style into the upper corner of the net all while maintaining his position behind it. Sometimes called the "Michigan", it is more commonly called what?

Answer: Legg Play

Mike Legg made this shot March 24, 1996. It made countless "plays of the year" countdowns and still is highlighted as one of the most creative goals ever. A select few players have successfully pulled this off in higher rank hockey leagues, but even rarer is how Legg pulled the shot off while standing stationary from behind the goal.
The other three names are legends from their football program (Tom Brady, Jim Harbaugh, Desmond Howard).
Source: Author Spaudrey

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor gtho4 before going online.
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